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SUSE

Open Mind, OpenSuse

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SUSE

mylifeinlinux.blogspot: It is advertised as a system for beginners, experienced users and ultra-geeks and on the basis that nearly everyone can fit into one of those categories, this should be a pleasant experience.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 138 is out

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SUSE

We are pleased to announce our new openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 138!

OpenSUSE 11.3 – my first impressions

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SUSE

openattitude.com: Over the weekend I replaced my trusty installation of Linux Mint with the latest and greatest OpenSUSE. What follows are some first impressions — the best I can do right now as I’m still trying to figure everything out…

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 137

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SUSE

We are pleased to announce our new openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 137.

openSUSE 11.3

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desktoplinuxreviews.com: SUSE Linux was one of my very first distros; I used to buy it from CompUSA and other places back when I first got started with Linux. These days, of course, one can simply use openSUSE instead of buying it at a store. This week I decided to look at openSUSE 11.3, the latest and greatest version.

The Perfect Server - OpenSUSE 11.3 x86_64 [ISPConfig 2]

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SUSE
HowTos

This is a detailed description about how to set up an OpenSUSE 11.3 server (x86_64) that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Dovecot POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc. In the end you should have a system that works reliably, and if you like you can install the free webhosting control panel ISPConfig 2 (i.e., ISPConfig runs on it out of the box).

openSUSE Weekly News 136

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SUSE

We are pleased to announce our new openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 136!

openSUSE 11.3 [Review]

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SUSE

thinkdigit.com: openSUSE is one of those few Linux distributions that gives you a choice of desktop environment while you are installing it, and doesn’t treat KDE or Gnome as a primary option. Both environments have equal support. This might not mean much for newcomers to the Linux world; however this does show that openSUSE is all about choice.

Spotlight on Linux: openSUSE 11.3

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SUSE

linuxjournal.com: The distribution is always of the highest quality with a professional feel and polish. Novell employs full-time developers to work on openSUSE and community projects, because many of the innovations first seen in openSUSE will end up in Novell's commercial SUSE Enterprise edition.

Changing distributions: openSUSE?

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SUSE

blogs.gnome.org: Due to everything that has happened at Mandriva, I guess it is time to switch distributions. I have no idea when I made the switch to Mandriva, but I know for certain I’ve used it for the last 5 years. At the moment I’m considering Fedora and openSUSE.

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More in Tux Machines

France Proposes Software Security Liability For Manufacturers, Open Source As Support Ends

It sometimes seems as though barely a week can go by without yet another major software-related hardware vulnerability story. As manufacturers grapple with the demands of no longer building simple appliances but instead supplying them containing software that may expose itself to the world over the Internet, we see devices shipped with insecure firmware and little care for its support or updating after the sale. The French government have a proposal to address this problem that may be of interest to our community, to make manufacturers liable for the security of a product while it is on the market, and with the possibility of requiring its software to be made open-source at end-of-life. In the first instance it can only be a good thing for device security to be put at the top of a manufacturer’s agenda, and in the second the ready availability of source code would present reverse engineers with a bonanza. Read more

today's howtos

Security: Updates, Word and More

Mozilla Development and News

  • Removing Support for Unpacked Extensions
    With the release of Firefox 62 (currently scheduled for August 21, 2018) Mozilla will discontinue support for unpacked sideloaded extensions. You will no longer be able to load an extension via the Windows registry by creating an entry with an extension’s directory (i.e. unpacked) after Firefox 61. Starting with Firefox 62, extensions sideloaded via the Windows registry must be complete XPI files (i.e. packed).
  • Making a Clap-Sensing Web Thing
    The Project Things Gateway exists as a platform to bring all of your IoT devices together under a unified umbrella, using a standardized HTTP-based API. We recently announced the Things Gateway and we’ve started a series of hands-on project posts for people who want to set up a Gateway and start playing around with the Web of Things. Earlier this month we began with a high-level overview of how to build a Gateway add-on.
  • Trying Mozilla's Things Gateway
    I have an old Raspberry Pi 1 Model B with a RaZberry Z-Wave Daughterboard which I had soldered a larger external antenna on to last year. I used to run OpenHAB on it to control some z-wave devices before I moved last year and since then it's just been in a box. Let's fire it up! This original Raspberry Pi is a single core 700mhz CPU, so I'm planning on running it headless and doing everything remotely over SSH to save on GUI resources.
  • Lando Demo
    Lando is so close now that I can practically smell the tibanna. Israel put together a quick demo of Phabricator/BMO/Lando/hg running on his local system, which is only a few patches away from being a deployed reality.
  • Snips Uses Rust to Build an Embedded Voice Assistant
    The team at Paris-based Snips has created a voice assistant that can be embedded in a single device or used in a home network to control lights, thermostat, music, and more. You can build a home hub on a Raspberry Pi and ask it for a weather report, to play your favorite song, or to brew up a double espresso. Manufacturers like Keecker are adding Snips’ technology to products like multimedia home robots. And Snips works closely with leaders across the value chain, like NVIDIA, EBV, and Analog Devices, in order to voice-enable an increasingly wider range of device types, from speakers to home automation systems to cars.
  • Mozilla v FCC: Mozilla Re-files Suit Against FCC to Protect Net Neutrality
    This morning, the Federal Communications Commission officially published its order overturning net neutrality rules in the Federal Register. We had originally filed suit early while simultaneously urging the court that the correct date was after this publication. We did this in an abundance of caution because we’re not taking any chances with an issue of this importance. That is why today, immediately after the order was published, Mozilla re-filed our suit challenging the FCC net neutrality order. We won’t waste a minute in our fight to protect net neutrality because it’s our mission to ensure the internet is a global public resource, open and accessible to all. An internet that truly puts people first, where individuals can shape their own experience and are empowered, safe and independent.
  • The Death Of Net Neutrality Will Be Official In April (Cue The Lawsuits)
    Of course that's really just the beginning of an entirely new chapter in the fight to prevent broadband monopolies from abusing a lack of competition in the broadband space (remember: net neutrality violations are just a symptom of a lack of competition, a problem nobody wants to seriously address for fear of upsetting campaign contributors). The publication in the Federal Register opens the door to the myriad lawsuits that will be filed against the agency. Those lawsuits range from suits by Mozilla and consumer groups, to the 22 state attorneys general who say they're also suing the agency for ignoring the public interest. These lawsuits must be filed within the next 60 days. Expect the court battle to quickly begin heating up in March.