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SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed Still Has KDE3 Packages, Developer Wants to Keep Them

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SUSE

In a recent report for the Tumbleweed rolling-release version of the openSUSE Linux operating system, Dominique Leuenberger informed users and developers alike that the KDE3 packages will soon be removed from the repositories.

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AMD Catalyst 15.5 Linux Video Driver Supports SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 12

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
SUSE

AMD finally updated their graphics driver for Linux platforms to version 15.5, a release that introduces support for the SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop (SLED) 12 operating system.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Now Uses Linux Kernel 4.0.4

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SUSE

The openSUSE Tumbleweed distro has received another set of updates this week, and the distribution is now using Linux kernel 4.0.4, which is the most advanced version available right now.

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Indonesia uses Linux, openSUSE for pilot project

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SUSE

An estimated 45,000 students from a province in Indonesia have enhanced their education and computer-usage knowledge through a pilot program using Linux and openSUSE that is expected to become a nationwide educational program.

From 2009 to 2014, the project called “Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Utilization for Educational Quality Enhancement in Yogyakarta Province” used openSUSE and created material with Linux to enhance educational quality and equality in Yogyakarta Province schools.

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​SUSE OpenStack Cloud: Any platform, anytime

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SUSE

SUSE, the well-known Linux company, may not have the OpenStack cloud reputation of rivals Canonical, Red Hat, and Mirantis, but it offers one thing that no one else does: It's public-cloud agnostic.

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Also: OpenStack Begins Vendor Certification Program

openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets Linux Kernel 4.0.3 and GNOME 3.16.2

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SUSE

A new set of improvements has landed in openSUSE Tumbleweed, the rolling release branch of the famous openSUSE Linux distribution.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed with KDE Plasma 5.3 Becomes Reality, Team Prepares for GCC 5.0

Filed under
KDE
SUSE

The openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling release version of the famous operating system has moved to KDE Plasma 5.3, and it looks like it's a smooth transition, although any help from the community is always welcomed.

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Also: openSUSE Tumbleweed Now Defaults To KDE Plasma 5.3

openSUSE Tumbleweed Now Uses KDE Plasma 5.3 as Default Desktop

Filed under
KDE
SUSE

openSUSE has just announced today, May 16, the immediate availability of the KDE Plasma 5.3 as the default desktop environment in Tumbleweed, along with the KDE Applications 15.04.1 software suite.

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Ubuntu GNOME vs openSUSE and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME
SUSE
Ubuntu

I recently tried out the latest version of Ubuntu with the GNOME desktop. Whilst my experience was largely positive how well did it compare to openSUSE and Fedora?

This comparison looks at the functionality of all three distributions from the average user's point of view.

The guide looks at how easy each distribution is to install, their look and feel, how easy it was to install multimedia codecs, the applications that are pre-installed, package management, performance and issues.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets Linux Kernel 4.0.1 and GNOME 3.16.1

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SUSE

Dominique Leuenberger from the openSUSE Tumbleweed development team announced today, May 8, what was implemented this week on the Tumbleweed version of the openSUSE Linux operating system.

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More in Tux Machines

Desktops, Rolling vs Stable, and New Internet Security

There is a lot of Linux news to report today as a lot of interesting things have been happening last few days. Over the weekend Jeff Hoogland, Bodhi Linux founder, briefed folks on the many graphical desktops for Linux including his own. Yesterday, Matt Hartley compared and contrasted long term versus rolling released Linux distributions and Jack Wallen said desktop Linux isn't really important anymore. Today, Jack Germain said Mandriva offshoot Rosa is a "real powerhouse" and the LF announced collaboration with the White House on new Internet security measures. Read more

Slackware Live 0.5.1, 1.0 on Its Way

Eric "AlienBob" Hameleers announced Slackware Live Edition 0.5.1 Saturday based on the latest Slackware 14.2 Beta. Hameleers said his livestak is "mostly complete at this point" but still lacks sufficient documentation. That's the goal for stable 1.0. For folks looking for a distro "well equipped to keep systemd out of our distro for a while" but still boots UEFI machines, perhaps Slack Live is the answer. It comes in Slackware default, Xfce, Plasma, and MATE versions, so why not book 'er up? Read more

Turning Open Source into a Multicore Standard

Open source OpenAMP is a framework that defines consistent features for life cycle management, interprocess communication and resource sharing among processors on a single SoC -- augmenting mainline Linux's existing LCM and IPC capabilities for working with other Linux environments. Thus, OpenAMP enables a Linux "master" to bring up a "remote" processor running its own bare-metal or RTOS environment, which in turn establishes communications channels with the master. Read more

SourceForge Loses DevShare

  • SourceForge Loses DevShare
  • SourceForge Acquisition and Future Plans
    Our first order of business was to terminate the “DevShare” program. As of last week, the DevShare program was completely eliminated. The DevShare program delivered installer bundles as part of the download for participating projects. We want to restore our reputation as a trusted home for open source software, and this was a clear first step towards that. We’re more interested in doing the right thing than making extra short-term profit. As we move forward, we will be focusing on the needs of our developers and visitors by building out site features and establishing community trust. Eliminating the DevShare program was just the first step of many more to come. Plans for the near future include full https support for both SourceForge and Slashdot, and a lot more changes we think developers and end-users will embrace.