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SUSE

SUSE: Markus Rex and YaST

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SUSE

The great leap backward [otherwise behind paywall]

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SUSE

Sayre's law states: "In any dispute the intensity of feeling is inversely proportional to the value of the issues at stake". In that context, it is perhaps easy to understand why the discussion around the version number for the next major openSUSE Leap release has gone on for hundreds of sometimes vitriolic messages. While this change is controversial, the openSUSE board hopes that it will lead to more rational versioning in the long term — but the world has a way of interfering with such plans.

OpenSUSE Leap is an interesting hybrid distribution; its core packages come from the slow-and-stable SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) release, but those packages are replaced or supplemented by much newer software where desired. The current (and only) openSUSE Leap release was originally based on SLE 12 and openSUSE 13.1. The project had an immediate problem in that it needed to come up with a version number for this new distribution; in the end, it did what any of us would have done and chose 42. The current release is openSUSE Leap 42.2.

[...]

That said, this decision has set up another existential crisis for the future: what happens when the SLE 42 release comes out and openSUSE Leap is faced with reusing a version number — a deed seen as being even more foul than going backward? Brown shrugged off this problem, saying that, at the current release rate, SLE 42 isn't due for over 100 years. There should, he implied, be time for plenty of other flame wars before that one needs to heat up.

Brown's math is neglecting an important fact, though: SLE just skipped over two numbers, and might well be expected to do the same thing again in the next century. After all, 16 is a power of two, and all those zeroes might make some potential customers nervous. It's also the atomic number of sulfur; best to just skip it. Italians see 17 as an exceptionally ill-starred number. 18 is voting age in much of the world, and nobody has had luck with voting recently, so that one should be avoided too. 19 is suspiciously prime, but might yet prove acceptable pending further research. And so on; SLE 42 may come far sooner than anybody expects.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get Linux Kernel 4.10.10, Updated Fonts, and More

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SUSE

openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio reports today, April 27, 2017, on the updates and improvements that landed in the software repositories during this week, brought by a total of four snapshots.

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openSUSE Leap's New Versioning Scheme Finally Syncs with SUSE Linux Enterprise

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SUSE

openSUSE Board Chairman Richard Brown informed the community about a major version number change for upcoming releases of the openSUSE Leap operating system.

As some of you might know already, openSUSE Leap 42.2 is the current stable release of the GNU/Linux distribution based on the sources of the commercial SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) operating system designed for enterprises, and the next scheduled release is openSUSE Leap 42.3, which is currently in development.

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Open-spec networking Mini-ITX has 1, 2.5, and 10 GbE ports

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Linux
SUSE

SolidRun’s “Marvell MacchiatoBIN” is a $349, Mini-ITX networking SBC that runs Linux 4.4 on Marvell’s quad -A72 Armada 8040, and supports ODP, OFP, and NFV.

SolidRun, which is known for its NXP i.MX6 based HummingBoard SBCs and Marvell Armada 38x based ClearFog Pro and scaled down ClearFog Base networking boards, has spun a $349 (and up) Marvell MacchiatoBIN SBC that showcases Marvell’s high-end Armada 8040 SoC. The 170 x 170mm “community” Mini-ITX board ships with schematics and layout files, and offers an open source, mainline Linux 4.4x BSP.

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openSUSE Leap's backward version jump

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SUSE

Hi all,

On behalf of the openSUSE Board and Leap Release Management I am
pleased to announce the next version of openSUSE Leap after 42.3 will
be:

openSUSE Leap 15

As with Leap 42.x, minor releases are expected annually for at least 3
years, so you can expect a Leap 15.1 to follow, then 15.2 and onwards.

Obviously this is quite a dramatic change from the current version
number of 42.x, so I will explain what justifies this change in some
detail below.

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openSUSE Leap 15 Will Succeed 42.3

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SUSE

What comes after openSUSE Leap 42.3 for SUSE's community non-rolling distribution? Version 15.

Richard Brown announced on the behalf of the openSUSE Board and Leap Release Manager that the next version after openSUSE Leap 42.3 will be openSUSE Leap 15. Yes, that's after pre-42 was openSUSE 13.2.

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Also: Mailinglist Archive: opensuse-project (15 mails)

Open Build Service Version 2.8 Released

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SUSE

The Build Service Team is happy to announce to release of Open Build Service 2.8! We’ve been hard at work to bring you many new features to the UI, the API and the backend. The UI has undergone several handy improvements including the filtering of the projects list based on a configurable regular expresion and the ability to download a project’s gpg key and ssl certificate (also available via the API). The API has been fine-tuned to allow more control over users including locking or deleting them from projects as well as declaring users to be sub-accounts of other users. The backend now includes new features such as mulibuild - the ability to build multiple jobs from a single source package without needing to create local links. Worker tracking and management has also been enhanced along with the new obsservicedispatch service which handles sources in an asynchronous queue. Published packages can now be removed using the osc unpublish command.

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Newest GNOME, KDE, Kernel Arrive in Tumbleweed

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SUSE

Eighteen openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots brought several new packages to users last month, which included both GNOME 3.24 and KDE Plasma 5.9.4.

GNOME 3.24 received most of the hype in snapshot 20170322, but that release also included Mozilla Firefox’s newest 52.0.1 version, which added support for WebAssembly, an emerging standard that brings near-native performance to Web-based games, apps, and software libraries without the use of plugins.

Closing out the month, snapshot 20170331 brought git 2.12.2 that provided a Command Line Interface output fix and python 3.6.1, which provided some bug fixes and updates to documentation. Ruby 2.2 switched to git-branch based patching and patched an exploitable heap overflow vulnerability for CVE-2016-2339.

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Also: openSUSE Goodies Pack

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

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Reviews
SUSE

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu.

I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want.

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Also: Google Summer of Code 2017

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Linux Mint 18.3 Cinnamon boots fast (even on a slow rotational disk), very stable (I haven’t seen any application crash in the past 3 days that I’ve been using it) and the level of responsiveness it has shown is top-notch, probably matched only by another Linux Mint! As far as the end user-experience is concerned, I’d say it’s the best ‘Linux’ distro for beginners, it certainly knows how to please the end-user… welcome to the HecticGeek‘s review of Linux Mint 18.3 Cinnamon edition. Few years ago Linux Mint changed their release strategy. They now rely on the core of Ubuntu LTS releases as the foundation for their operating system. As far as I can see, this is working great for them. Because Ubuntu LTS (Long Term Support) provides security & maintenance updates up to 5 years & it is already based on a solid foundation set by Ubuntu. This in tern gives Linux Mint developers enough space to ‘breath’ a little and fully concentrate on what they do best: development of their awesome desktop shell & other native Linux Mint user-applications. Read more