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openSUSE Leap 42.3

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SUSE
  • I just spent about 5 hours trying to install Linux mint, Then finally gave up and installed OpenSuse in about half an hour.
  • openSUSE Leap 42.3 Linux OS Release Features

    The Linux best project openSUSE Project releases its latest & most powerful Linux based operating system openSUSE Leap 42.3 brings the community version aligned with its core of SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12.

    The Linux users, administrators & developers use the newest chameleon distribution with the support of mutual packages of both Leap & SLE distributions. The leap 42.3 new release has SUSE adopters including server OS so as to deploy IT in physical, virtual & cloud environments.

    openSUSE Leap 42.3 is the Leap’s 3rd edition which has more than 10,000 packages and offers better stability for the Linux users with a new refresh hardware enables release.The release is powered by Linux 4.4 Long-Term-Support (LTS) kernel. Leap 42.3 supports KDE’s Long-Term-Support LTS release 5.8 as the default desktop selection. It also offers GNOME 3.20 as well as SUSE Linux Enterprise support.

A look at OpenSUSE based Gecko Linux

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Reviews
SUSE

I was sitting at home writing future articles for Ghacks and I decided on a spur of the moment whim that I wanted to try out a distribution I had never touched before.

I’ve tried countless systems over the years, from the typical Ubuntu and Debian based systems, to Arch based systems like Manjaro, even Gentoo based systems like Sabayon.

However, I was thinking about it and OpenSUSE used to be one of my favourite distributions to use but I’ve never actually sat down and tried a respin of an OpenSUSE based system; so I started digging around into what some popular ones were...And Gecko Linux caught my eye.

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Things To Do After Installing openSUSE, YaST Development Sprint 39

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SUSE

Hands-on: A walk through the openSUSE Leap 42.3 installer

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SUSE

I wrote about the latest openSUSE Leap release a few days ago. In that post, I included some details about upgrading an existing openSUSE Leap installation to the new release. Since then, I have performed a fresh installation on another of my systems (the Acer Aspire V), so in this post I am going to include screenshots and a brief description of the installation process.

First, let's repeat some of the basic information about this release. The release announcement on the openSUSE website gives a bit of information (and a lot of propaganda) about the new release.The release notes contain a lot more technical detail, so be sure to read them before starting.

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SUSE aims to tackle skills shortage in open source in ME

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OSS
SUSE

SUSE is teaming up with the training arm of technology distributor Ingram Micro to offer a set of 18 instructed-led SUSE training modules in the Middle East.

A Linux Foundation study last year found out that 87% of hiring managers say open skills are hard to come by.

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OpenSUSE 42.3

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SUSE
  • openSUSE 42.3 Released, Here’s What’s New

    After 8 months of continues development. The openSUSE team has just announced openSUSE 42.3. Which is considered to be the latest release of the stable openSUSE branch (called Leap).

  • openSUSE Leap 42.3 Linux-based operating system is here -- download it now

    Variety is both a gift and curse for Linux on the desktop. On the one hand, it is nice that there are so many operating systems based on the kernel from which to choose. On the other, it can sometimes feel like the community is very fragmented. Not only is there tribalism between users of distributions, but desktop environments too. For instance, there is Ubuntu vs. Fedora and KDE vs. GNOME -- much like Coke vs. Pepsi and Chevy vs. Ford. This is just human nature, I suppose.

openSUSE Leap 42.3 Gives Smooth Desktop and Server Upgrade

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SUSE

The openSUSE Project released openSUSE Leap 42.3 today bringing the community version more closely aligned with its shared core of SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12 Service Pack 3.

The mutual packages of both Leap and SLE distributions give seasoned Linux users, systems administrators, and developers even more reason to use the newest chameleon distribution.

Users are advised to take advantage of the seamless upgrade to Leap 42.3. Leap 42.2 reaches its end of maintenance in six months.

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Also: openSUSE Leap 42.3 Officially Released, Based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 SP3

openSUSE Leap 42.3 Officially Released

Red Hat, Fedora, and SUSE News

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Red Hat CFO Pursues Cloud Agenda

    In 2012, when CFO spoke with Red Hat finance chief Charlie Peters, the company essentially had a single significant product offering, the operating system Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Five years later, the company is neck deep in its transformation to a company with a burgeoning position in cloud-platform technologies. And the current CFO, Eric Shander, happens to have the kind of deep technology experience that could help accelerate that evolution.

  • Red Hat's Boltron snaps together a modular Linux server

    Red Hat’s ongoing experiments with making its Linux distributions more modular and flexible have yielded a new sub-distribution of Fedora.

    Dubbed Fedora Boltron Server, the new prototype server project uses the various modularity technologies that Red Hat has been building into Fedora. Its goal is a Linux distribution in which multiple versions of the same system components can live and work side-by-side, non-destructively.

  • FAD Latam - Final Report

    The FADs (Fedora Activity Day) were technical in many cases, but this time We can to realize an organizational FAD that allowed the ambassadors to achieve objectives and to contribute to the community in a better way.

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  • openSUSE Leap zaps games, drives servers, loves DevOps

    The openSUSE Project has released openSUSE Leap 42.3.

    With this release we can see that the community version is now more closely aligned with the ‘shared core’ of SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12 Service Pack 3.

openSUSE Leap 42.3: Get ready to upgrade

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SUSE

The openSUSE Leap distribution is about to make a new release, Leap 42.3.

While Leap is normally a 'point release' distribution, the development of Leap 42.3 has been conducted as if it were a 'rolling release', so since May I have had several of my systems running the 42.3 pre-release and following the development as it progressed.

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Servers: SUSE, Boltron, Virtual Machines, Containers, and 'Cloud' Computing

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Server
SUSE
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Real Time boosts app performance

    a Linux kernel that also offers applications and tools to manage and support a real-time environment. The kernel uses different scheduler queues and makes a distinction between normal processes and real-time processes. If there is a shortage of available resources, the Linux kernel will service the real-time resources first.

  • Boltron - Fedora Modular OS playground!

    Last summer at Flock Langdon White, Ralph Bean and couple folks around them announced work on new release tools and a project called Modularity. The goal was simple but aspirational - for couple years we've talked about rings proposal, splitting applications from the core of the OS, having alternatives available and easily installable for certain components and even though for all of these usecases you could always find a way how to achieve them they weren't really supported by the build infrastructure and software management tools. Once you would update your system or install something else it would usually break or do something unexpected. Modularity goal was to come up with a straightforward way how to deliver a bulk of content thru our build pipeline, offer multiple versions of components and different installation profiles. At the same time this new approach to delivering content would not break existing workflows and will be super easy for package maintainers.

  • Fedora Modular Server "Boltron" Preview Release Now Available

    Fedora developers have announced the first preview release of Boltron, their Modular Server effort. Fedora Modular Server is aiming to separate the lifecycle of applications from each other and the operating system itself. This is part of Fedora's broader modularity efforts while this Boltron preview today is about the server components.

  • Serverless Computing May Offer Better Economics Than Virtual Machines

    Serverless computing is becoming yet another way for cloud service providers to parse out access to enterprises looking to take advantage of virtualized services. Think containers, only slightly different.

    Serverless computing architectures are designed to reduce the amount of overhead associated with offering services in the cloud. This includes the ability for a cloud provider to dynamically manage server resources.

  • This Week in Scalability: System Backups in the Container Era

    As we gear up to release our next e-book on the Kubernetes open source container orchestration engine (check with us in about a month), we have been reviewing how well K8s has been making its way into the enterprise — the true determinant of whether the software becomes an essential component of “the new stack,” so to speak.

    Reviewing our notes from Kubecon 2017, held earlier this year in Berlin, we found some powerful testimonies from both Salesforce and Comcast. Salesforce is using it in a pilot program to power three cloud-native services, with plans to be running 20 services by the end of the year. When the company’s engineers were considering different orchestration options, they immediately appreciated the smarts behind the Kubernetes. After all, many had come from other jobs managing large at-scale workloads. “We were, frankly, blown away. The development velocity was incredible, even back then,” Salesforce Principal Architect Steve Sandke said of the developers behind Kubernetes. “These people clearly knew what they were doing.”

  • Federal Cloud Computing

    Open source software (OSS) and cloud computing are distinctly different concepts that have independently grown in use, both in the public and private sectors, but have each faced adoption challenges by federal agencies. Both OSS and cloud computing individually offer potential benefits for federal agencies to improve their efficiency, agility, and innovation, by enabling them to be more responsive to new or changing requirements in their missions and business operations. OSS improves the way the federal government develops and also distributes software and provides an opportunity to reduce costs through the reuse of existing source code, whereas cloud computing improves the utilization of resources and enables a faster service delivery.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Vulkan and Vega M

  • Vulkan Virgl Has Kicked Off For Supporting This Graphics/Compute API Within VMs
    Of the hundreds of projects for this year's Google Summer of Code, there are many interesting GSoC 2018 projects but one of those that I am most excited for is Vulkan-Virgl for getting this modern API supported with hardware acceleration by guest virtual machines. As implied by the name, this effort is based upon the Virgl project started by David Airlie and originally tasked with getting OpenGL acceleration to guest VMs using a fully open-source Linux driver stack. Virgl has been in good shape for a while now with OpenGL, while this summer the hope is to get the Vulkan API support going for opening up VMs to using this high-performance graphics and compute API.
  • AMDVLK Driver Lands Half-Float Additions, Many Other Improvements
    There's been another weekly-ish public code push to the AMDVLK open-source AMD Vulkan Linux driver stack and this time around it's heavy on feature work. There has been a fair amount of changes pertaining to half-float (FP16) support including support for the AMD_gpu_shader_half_float extension, prepping for VK_AMD_gpu_shader_half_float_fetch, FP16 interpolation intrinsics and register settings, and more.
  • Vega M Graphics On Intel Kabylake G CPUs Are Beginning To Work Under Linux
    We have been covering the Linux driver upbringing of "Vega M" for the Vega/Polaris graphics found in select newer Intel "Kabylake G" processors. The code is still in flight before it will work in all released versions of the Linux driver components, but for those willing to build the code or rely upon third party repositories, Vega M is now working on Linux. As I have covered in various past articles, the open-source driver support for Radeon Vega M is queued into DRM-Next for the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel cycle, Mesa 18.1 albeit with new hardware I always recommend using the latest Git (current Mesa 18.2), and there are also binary GPU microcode files needed too.

Plasma 5.13 – Amazing Tux, How Sweet Plasma

Plasma 5.13 is (going to be) a very nice release. It builds on the solid foundation that is the LTS edition, and adds cool, smart touches. The emphasis is on seamless integration of elements, which is what separates professionals from amateurs. It’s all around how the WHOLE desktop behaves, and not individual programs in isolation. And Plasma is making great strides, offering a polished version of an already mature and handsome product, with extra focus on fonts, media and browser connectivity and good performance. There are some rough patches. Apart from the obvious beta issues, those goes without saying, KDE Connect ought to be a true multi-phone product, the network stack really needs to be spotless, and that means full Microsoft Windows inter-operability, Spectacle should allow for configurable shadows and alpha channel, and I want to see if the decorative backend has been cleaned up, i.e. can you search and install new themes and icons without encountering useless errors and inconsistencies. But all in all, I’m quite impressed. The changes are big and noticeable, and above all, meaningful. You don’t just get features for the sake of it, you get things that improve the quality and consistency of the desktop, that maximize fun and productivity, and there’s deep thought in orchestrating it all together. It ain’t just a random bunch of options that happen to work. I like seeing patterns in things, and I’m happy when there’s functional harmony. This spring season of distro testing hasn’t been fun, and Plasma 5.13 is balm for my weary wrists, so hurting from all that angry typing. More than worth a spin, and highly recommended. Full steam on, Tuxers. Read more Also: This week in Usability & Productivity, part 20

Sad News! Development Stopped for Korora and BackSlash Linux

It seems more and more small distributions are facing a had time. Recently we saw the crisis at Void Linux. Now we have two more small Linux distributions calling it quit, albeit temporarily. Read more

Android Leftovers