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ownCloud, Nextcloud, and OpenSUSE

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  • ownCloud Summit at openSUSE Conference Cancelled

    The openSUSE project announces the immediate cancellation of the ownCloud Summit that was scheduled to take place during the openSUSE Conference in two weeks.

    The summit was scheduled for June 22 – 23.

    Given the ownCloud community has forked, openSUSE sought an amicable solution so that both communities could take part in the openSUSE conference. As this was found to not be possible, the openSUSE Board made the decision to cancel the summit.

  • Nextcloud hackweek and open BBQ!

    Yesterday we kicked off a meeting in Stuttgart to discuss Nextcloud and get work done. A first result is the establishment of the new Server repository on Github (and more repositories!) and we'll share other things on the forums and in Github issues the coming days. The real important news however is that we decided to organize a BBQ!

  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 20

    The latest Scrum sprint of the YaST team was shorter than the average three weeks and also a little bit “under-powered” with more people on vacation or sick leave than usual. The bright side of shorter sprints is that you don’t have to wait three full weeks to get an update on the status. Here you have it!

SUSE Leftovers

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  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Getting Linux Kernel 4.6.1, LibreOffice 5.2, and GCC 6 Soon

    On June 6, 2016, openSUSE Project's Dominique Leuenberger wrote on the openSUSE Tumbleweed's mailing list a quick review of the major software updates that landed in the week that just passed for the rolling release distribution.

    Those of you who are currently using the openSUSE Tumbleweed OS on your personal computers, are aware of the fact that there were a total of four snapshots released last week, which brought many exciting new GNU/Linux technologies, such as the Linux 4.6 kernel, the KDE Applications 16.04.1 software suite for the KDE Plasma 5.6 desktop environment, and the Perl 5.24.0 packages.

  • openSUSE's Open Build Service 2.7 Adds Better Integration of External Resources

    openSUSE Project, through Henne Vogelsang, announced on June 6, 2016, the general availability of the version 2.7 of the project's Open Build Service (OBS) software distribution solution.

SUSE Leftovers

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  • Open Build Service version 2.7 released

    We are happy to announce the availability of the Open Build Service Version 2.7! Three large features around the topic of integrating external resources made it into this release. We worked on automatic tracking of moving repositories of development versions like Fedora Rawhide, distribution updates or rolling Linux releases like Arch. A change to the OBS git integration to enable developers to work on continuous builds. And last but not least an experimental KIWI import that can be used to easily migrate your images from SUSE studio.

  • ​SUSE Enterprise Storage 3 released for serious storage work

    When Red Hat bought Ceph's parent company Inktank, people were worried Red Hat would keep Ceph's object store and file system to itself. Then, Red Hat announced it would let others help decide on Ceph's future. Now, SUSE, a rival Linux power, is taking Red Hat up on this with its Ceph-supporting release of SUSE Enterprise Storage 3.

SUSE Leftovers

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  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/22
  • openSUSE.Asia 2016 announced from Indonesia

    We are happy to announce the third openSUSE.Asia Summit. The openSUSE.Asia Summit 2016 will take place at Sunan Kalijaga State Islamic University in Yogyakarta, Indonesia on October 1st and 2nd, 2016.

    The summit is a great way for both openSUSE contributors, and, users to meet each other and have fun. The openSUSE community will get together, share their experiences, and, learn free and open source technologies.

SUSE Leftovers

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  • Google Summer of Code Student Implementing Payment Feature

    Embedded below is the blog of Google Summer of Code student Rishabh Saxena. Rishabh is assisting with openSUSE’s Open Source Event Management during the Google Summer of Code.

  • Debugger in YaST

    Until now debugging the YaST installation was usually done by checking the y2log. If you needed more details you would add more log calls.

    This is inconvenient and takes too much time. For better debugging a real debugger would be nice…

  • May “installs” — Tumbleweed and 42.2 Alpha1

    It’s early June, and I still have not reported a couple of “installs” that I did in May. So better late than never.

    I used scare quotes around “install” because I did not actually install Tumbleweed in May, though I did do some install tests. There’s not a lot to report, so this will be a short post.

OpenSUSE Tumbleweed 's Latest

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  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Getting Linux Kernel 4.6 Soon, GCC 6 Migration in Progress

    Today, June 1, 2016, openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio informed the openSUSE community about the latest GNU/Linux technologies that are coming to the rolling openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system, as well as what has landed last week.

    First of all, users are being informed that the first Alpha release of the upcoming openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system is now available for download and testing. However, the development cycle for openSUSE Leap 42.2 has just started, and it looks like the final release lands in the first week of November 2016.

  • openSUSE News: New Kernel, KDE Applications to arrive in Tumbleweed

    openSUSE Leap 42.2 Alpha 1, which is now available for testing, made some news last week, but this week’s news focuses more on openSUSE’s rolling distribution.

    Developers have been focusing on moving Tumbleweed to GNU Compiler Collection 6, which is always challenging for a distribution.

    In the openSUSE Tumbleweed’s Review of the Weeks 2016/21 email sent out last week by Dominique Leuenberger, he listed the progression of moving GCC 6 to the default compiler, which can be viewed on the wiki.

GeckoLinux version 421.160527.0 based on openSUSE Leap with significant updates

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GeckoLinux is a Linux spin based on the openSUSE Leap distribution, with a focus on polish and out-of-the-box usability on the desktop. Its recent 421.160527.0 update is offered in eight (8) editions: Cinnamon, XFCE, Gnome, Plasma, Mate, Budgie, LXQt, and "BareBones", with significant improvements.

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OpenSUSE 42.2 Alpha

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openSUSE Leap 42.2 Enters Development, First Alpha Build Brings New Goodies

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openSUSE developer Ludwig Nussel has proudly announced today, May 24, 2016, that a first Alpha build of the upcoming openSUSE Leap 42.2 computer operating system is now ready for public testing.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Needs Your Help to Make GCC 6 the Default Compiler

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We reported at the beginning of the month that the openSUSE Tumbleweed developers are preparing a massive package rebuild to make the GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) 6 the default compiler for the rolling operating system.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Puppet Rolls Out New Docker Image Builds
    Folks who are focused on container technology and virtual machines as they are implemented today might want to give a hat tip to some of the early technologies and platforms that arrived in the same arena. Among those, Puppet, which was built on the legacy of the venerable Cfengine system, was an early platform that helped automate lots of virtual machine implementations. We covered it in depth all the way back in 2008. Earlier this year, Puppet Labs rebranded as simply Puppet, and also named its first president and COO, Sanjay Mirchandani, who came to the company from VMware, where he was a senior vice-president. Now, at PuppetConf, the company has announced the availability of Puppet Docker Image Build, which "automates the container build process to help organizations as they define, build and deploy containers into production environments." This new set of capabilities adds to existing Puppet functionality for installing and managing container infrastructure, including Docker, Kubernetes and Mesos, among others.
  • Five Cool Alternative Open Source Linux Shells
    We are going to look at some of the available Linux shells out there that users have access to free of charge since they are open source, they come in a number of different licenses and this mainly depends on the software creator but in essence one doesn’t have to pay to use the system; so that a major plus in whichever way we look at it. We find that there are different kinds of users when it comes to Linux, the ones who tread carefully preferring to stick to tried and tested software, the other kinds are the ones who dive into the deep end of cutting edge software; head first.
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/42
    This was week 42 – The openSUSE LEAP week of the Year. It can’t be a co-incidence that the Release Candidate 1 was announced in Week 42, on the 2nd day (42.2 – European counting, we start our week on Monday, not on Sunday). But also in Tumbleweed things are not standing still: of course many of the things are well in line with what Leap received (like for example Plasma updates), but Tumbleweed rolls at a different pace ahead of the game.

Red Hat News

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • The Open Source Way
    "Open source", in the world of IT, is program code that is meant for collaboration and open contribution. Intended to be modified and shared, because by design and spirit, it is meant for the public at large. It’s been said that “"open source" intimates a broader set of values—what we call "the open source way." Open source projects, products, or initiatives embrace and celebrate principles of open exchange, collaborative participation, rapid prototyping, transparency, meritocracy, and community-oriented development.” So it is a natural conclusion that in this age of open and transparent government, that the government IT manager or technician would be one of the first to want to embrace this new role of collaborative team member within a larger community.
  • Another rift in the open source BPM market: @FlowableBPM forks from @Alfresco Activiti
    In early 2013, Camunda – at the time, a value-added Activiti consulting partner as well as a significant contributor to the open source project – created a fork from Activiti to form what is now the Camunda open source BPM platform as well as their commercial version based on the open source core.
  • Pydio, an Open Source File Sharing and Sync Solution, Out in New Version
    If you've followed us here at OStatic, you've probably seen our coverage of open source file sharing, cloud and synchronization tools. For example, we've covered ownCloud and Nextcloud extensively. Not so many people know about Pydio, though, which is out in a new version Pydio7. It's an open source file sharing & sync solution that now has a host of new features and performance upgrades. It's worth downloading and trying. Through a new partnership with Collabora Productivity (the LibreOffice Cloud provider), Pydio7 now combines file sharing, document editing and online collaboration. Users can now not only access documents online, but also co-author new content and work collaboratively.
  • Chrome 55 Beta: Input handling improvements and async/await functions
    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, Mac, and Windows.
  • Chrome 55 Beta Brings Async/Await To JavaScript
    Google is ending this week by rolling out the Chrome/Chromium 55 web-browser beta. Chrome 55 Beta brings support for the async and await keywords to JavaScript for Promise-based JavaScript coding. Great to see them finally improving the asynchronous JS support.
  • Open-Source Innovations Driving Demand for Hadoop
    AtScale, provider of BI (Business Intelligence) on Hadoop, has released its study titled "The Business Intelligence Benchmark for SQL-on-Hadoop engines," which is a performance test of BI workloads on Hadoop. The report also studies the strengths and weaknesses of Hive, Presto, Impala and Spark SQL, which are the most popular analytical engines for Hadoop.
  • Microsoft CEO Offers SQL Server for Linux Update [Ed: bad idea to use it [1, 2]]
  • New SafariSeat wheelchairs made from bicycle parts help East Africans roam rough terrain
  • SafariSeat, an Open Source Wheelchair for Rural Offroading
    If you’re disabled in a poorly developed part of the world, even a great modern wheelchair may be next to useless. What’s needed is a more off-road design that’s made to be easy to manufacture and repair than something built for a city with sidewalks. SafariSeat is a newly designed open-source wheelchair that hopes to make a big impact for disabled people the world over. It uses push bars for power and has large front wheels and small rear ones to easily roll over large objects. In a novel move, the designers included a moving seat that shifts bit every time you push the bars to help prevent pressure sores on the butt.
  • Five 3D printing projects for Halloween
    With Halloween fast approaching I figured it was time to add some 3D printed decorations to the office. Below are some of my pictures for fun Halloween-themed prints. I tried to pick some models that demonstrate varied printing techniques.