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SUSE

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • The Unheard Of Company Behind The Failed Ubuntu Tablet Now Aims For OpenSUSE Tablet

    Back in 2014~2015 was talk of an Ubuntu Tablet inspired by the failed Ubuntu Edge smartphone campaign and the company would just send along prototype pictures and specifications along with some pricing goals. That tablet never materialized but now that same group of folks is trying a crowdfunding campaign for an openSUSE tablet.

    Coming as a surprise to us today is that MJ Technology, the basically unheard of company trying for the earlier Ubuntu Tablet, is now pushing out an openSUSE Tablet. “MJ Technology, a leader in affordable cutting edge tech, is pleased to introduce the MJ Technology Warrior series tablets powered by openSUSE,” MJ Tech's CEO told OpenSUSE.org. Affordable cutting edge tech? Their only other apparent product has been a "MJ7HDTV" Android HDTV Tuner Tablet.

  • MJ Technology Tablet has openSUSE, Dual Boot

    It’s official; the Warrior Tablet made by MJ Technology and powered by openSUSE is ready for the world; now it just needs funding through an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign.

    Avid Linux users can reap the benefits of four 10.1” Linux tablets offered by MJ Techology. The specifications of the four tablets vary in power and cost, but all come with the power of Linux and openSUSE at the core.

    “MJ Technology, a leader in affordable cutting edge tech, is pleased to introduce the MJ Technology Warrior series tablets powered by openSUSE,” said Mark Jun, CEO for MJ Technology.

  • openSUSE Mentors Blog about Google Summer of Code Experience

    Mentors for this year’s Google Summer of Code blog about their experience being a mentor, the Mentor Summit at Google and the collaborative effort start an openSUSE mentoring page, 101.opensuse.org. View the blow here or read it below.

Red Hat and SUSE

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Red Hat
SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Received KDE Applications 16.08.3, VirtualBox 5.1.8

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SUSE

Dominique Leuenberger from the openSUSE Project reports at the end of last week on the latest updated packages that arrived in the stable repositories for the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling Linux operating system.

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OpenSUSE 42.2 Merges Best Features of Enterprise, Community Models

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Reviews
SUSE

In the world of Linux distributions, users are often faced with the option of choosing an enterprise-grade distribution or a community distribution. With the openSUSE Leap approach, SUSE is attempting to merge the best of both the enterprise and community models into a new type of Linux distribution. In the pure community-first model the upstream open-source code is packaged in a distribution, which can then be further hardened to eventually produce an enterprise-grade Linux product. The open-source openSUSE Leap 42.2 Linux distribution became generally available on Nov. 16 and takes a different approach. Code from the SUSE Linux Enterprise Service Pack 2 release, which debuted on Nov. 8, is now in the freely available openSUSE Leap 42.2 update. As part of its enterprise community stability focus, openSUSE Leap benefits from the Linux 4.4 Long Term Support Kernel (LTS). SUSE expects to support openSUSE Leap releases for 36 months. The new release also includes the latest in open-source application packages with LibreOffice and Firefox as well as developer and graphics tools. This slide show eWEEK takes a look at some of the features in the new openSUSE 42.2 Linux operating system release.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed News

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/46

    Now this is a week I call fully rolling. There was a full 7 snapshots since the last review – which is about the maximum we can do in a week with one snapshot per day (or we have to change the versioning to not be only ‘date’ based). So, this review is about the snapshots {20161110..20161116}.

  • When Trying Out Tumbleweed, It's Easy To See Why OpenSUSE Leap Disabled Nouveau

    I've been running some fresh benchmarks of the recently released openSUSE Leap 42.2 compared to the rolling-release openSUSE Tumbleweed and friends. Those benchmarks will be posted shortly, but after using the Nouveau experience on Tumbleweed I found the need to comment.

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Leap 42.2 Linux Now Officially Available for PowerPC64le Architectures

    Just one day after the official release of the openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system, Michel Normand from the openSUSE Project was proud to announce on November 17, 2016, the availability of the PowerPC port.

    Yes, you're reading that right, while many other popular GNU/Linux distributions are in discussions to deprecate support for the PowerPC (PPC) hardware architecture, including Debian Project and Canonical for their upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" and Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) releases, it looks like openSUSE still support it.

  • Organize an openSUSE Leap 42.2 Release Party

    Having a party to celebrate an achievement is always great and the openSUSE community knows how to party; just look at all the fun we have at openSUSE conferences and summits.

    With the release of openSUSE Leap 42.2, a release party is in order. Selecting a good date and having some goodies to pass out to the party requires some planning. The checklist below can help with planning the release party, but the most important thing if you plan on having a party is to email ddemaio (at) suse.de well before the party to get some open-source goodies to give away. Please include “Leap 42.2” Party in the subject line and include a mailing address.

  • Preparing for openSUSE 42.2

openSUSE 13.2 Linux Operating System to Reach End of Life on January 16, 2017

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SUSE

On November 17, 2016, it appears that Marcus Meissner from the openSUSE Project sent an advanced discontinuation notice for users of the openSUSE 13.2 Linux operating system.

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Enterprise Linux Showdown: SUSE Linux

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Linux
SUSE

SUSE combines tried and tested tools and build methodologies that make this Linux offering a favorite in corporate environments. At the same time, and thanks to openSUSE and the online services built around it, SUSE Linux can also be daring and exciting. Although it has had low points over its long history, the Linux community is lucky that SUSE Linux is still with us and still going strong.

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SUSE releases SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2

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SUSE

While I was off fighting viruses, SUSE released an update to its SUSE Linux Enterprise 12, a popular business Linux operating environment. The focus of this service pack appears to be accelerating network performance, enhancing support for SAP applications and HANA, improving support for IBM Power architecture systems and other important improvements.

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  • openSUSE Leap 42.2 Officially Released, Includes GNOME 3.20 & KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS

    The openSUSE Project had the pleasure of informing Softpedia today, November 16, 2016, about the general availability of the openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system for personal computers.

    Designed to offer users only well-established Open Source and GNU/Linux technologies, and built using the source code from the recently released SUSE Enterprise Linux (SLE) 12 Service Pack 2 (SP2) operating system, the second major update to the openSUSE Leap 42 open-source and free distribution is here after being in development for the past six months. There are numerous new features and updated components in openSUSE Leap 42.2, some of which Tumbleweed users are already enjoying.

  • Optimal Release for Linux Professionals Arrives with openSUSE Leap 42.2

    Members of the openSUSE Project are pleased to announce the release of the next minor version of Leap; openSUSE Leap 42.2! Leap is made to give stability-minded users and conservative technology adopters peace of mind. openSUSE Leap 42.2 is powered by the Linux 4.4 Long-Term-Support (LTS) kernel and is a secure, stable and reliable server operating system for deploying IT services in physical, virtual or cloud environments.

    A selective process of including well-established packages in openSUSE Leap 42.2 gives new meaning to the term Linux Optimization; openSUSE Leap is simply the safe choice that offers Linux professionals a user-friendly desktop and a feature-rich server environment.

  • OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 Arrives

    Hitting the web this morning is the official release of openSUSE Leap 42.2.

    OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 makes use of the older Linux 4.4 kernel due to its LTS status, makes use of the KDE Plasma 5.8 desktop by default, and a wide variety of other package updates. OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 continues to be derived from SUSE Linux Enterprise.

SUSE advances its open-source storage system

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SUSE

Besides announcing its next version of Ceph-powered SUSE Enterprise Storage, SUSE has bought openATTIC, the open-source Ceph and storage management framework.

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Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Security Tips for Installing Linux on Your SysAdmin Workstation
    Once you’ve chosen a Linux distro that meets all the security guidelines set out in our last article, you’ll need to install the distro on your workstation.
  • Fedora 26 crypto policy Test Day today (2017-03-30)!
  • Open-source developers targeted in sophisticated malware attack
    For the past few months, developers who publish their code on GitHub have been targeted in an attack campaign that uses a little-known but potent cyberespionage malware. The attacks started in January and consisted of malicious emails specifically crafted to attract the attention of developers, such as requests for help with development projects and offers of payment for custom programming jobs. The emails had .gz attachments that contained Word documents with malicious macro code attached. If allowed to execute, the macro code executed a PowerShell script that reached out to a remote server and downloaded a malware program known as Dimnie.
  • A scramble at Cisco exposes uncomfortable truths about U.S. cyber defense
    When WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange disclosed earlier this month that his anti-secrecy group had obtained CIA tools for hacking into technology products made by U.S. companies, security engineers at Cisco Systems (CSCO.O) swung into action. The Wikileaks documents described how the Central Intelligence Agency had learned more than a year ago how to exploit flaws in Cisco's widely used Internet switches, which direct electronic traffic, to enable eavesdropping. Senior Cisco managers immediately reassigned staff from other projects to figure out how the CIA hacking tricks worked, so they could help customers patch their systems and prevent criminal hackers or spies from using the same methods, three employees told Reuters on condition of anonymity.
  • NTPsec: a Secure, Hardened NTP Implementation
    Network time synchronization—aligning your computer's clock to the same Universal Coordinated Time (UTC) that everyone else is using—is both necessary and a hard problem. Many internet protocols rely on being able to exchange UTC timestamps accurate to small tolerances, but the clock crystal in your computer drifts (its frequency varies by temperature), so it needs occasional adjustments. That's where life gets complicated. Sure, you can get another computer to tell you what time it thinks it is, but if you don't know how long that packet took to get to you, the report isn't very useful. On top of that, its clock might be broken—or lying. To get anywhere, you need to exchange packets with several computers that allow you to compare your notion of UTC with theirs, estimate network delays, apply statistical cluster analysis to the resulting inputs to get a plausible approximation of real UTC, and then adjust your local clock to it. Generally speaking, you can get sustained accuracy to on the close order of 10 milliseconds this way, although asymmetrical routing delays can make it much worse if you're in a bad neighborhood of the internet.
  • Zelda Coatings
    I assume that every permutation of scams will eventually be tried; it is interesting that the initial ones preyed on people's avarice and dishonesty: "I will transfer millions to your bank account, then you share with me" - with subsequent scams appealing to another demographic: "I want to donate a large sum to your religious charity" - to perhaps capture a more virtuous but still credulous lot. Where will it end ?

Tizen and Android

Linux and Linux Foundation

Mesa and Intel Graphics