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SUSE

openSUSE Leap 42.2 Linux Operating System Gets a Second Beta with KDE Plasma 5.8

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SUSE

Today, September 22, 2016, the openSUSE Project proudly announced the release and immediate availability for download of the second Beta development milestone towards the openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system.

openSUSE Leap 42.2 Beta 2 comes with several interesting improvements and up-to-date software components, including the KDE Applications 16.08.0, KDE Frameworks 5.26.0, GStreamer 1.8.3, GTK+ 2.24.31, GTK+ 3.20.9, json-glib 1.2.2, Wireshark 2.2.0, and Xen 4.7.0_12.

Other than that, the openSUSE KDE team did a fantastic job of integrating the recently announced Beta release of the KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS desktop environment into openSUSE Leap 42.2 Beta 2 so you can get an early taste and see if there are any show stoppers that need to be addressed before the final version lands in mid-November.

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Also: New Leap Beta Adds Plasma 5.8 Beta

SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Now Includes GCC 6.2, GNU Binutils 2.26.1 & GDB 7.11.1

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SUSE

SUSE's Andreas Jaeger reports on the availability of an updated toolchain for the SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 operating system, bringing the latest tools designed for application development.

The updated toolchain included in SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 comes with some of the latest and most advanced development utilities, such as GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) 6.2, GDB (GNU Debugger) 7.11.1, and GNU Binutils 2.26.1, thus enabling app developers to use the newest technologies when creating their amazing projects.

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Latest openSUSE Tumbleweed Snapshots Bring Wine 1.9.18, Glibc 2.24 & Mesa 12.0.2

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The first snapshots for the month of September have been released for the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system, and Douglas DeMaio is here again to report on the freshly added software versions.

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SUSE at Daimler and OpenSUSE Tumbleweed

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SUSE
  • Daimler AG Migrates its Mission Critical Servers to Suse Linux

    SUSE technologies are helping Daimler AG, the German automotive behemoth, to migrate a large proportion of its mission-critical servers from proprietary UNIX operating systems to 'the open and flexible Linux platform'.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/36

    Another week with 4 snapshots has passed, sadly some issues managed to sneak in but, as you are used to by Tumbleweed already, we managed to resolve the issues on the mailing list in no time and made sure that upcoming snapshots get the fixes asap. The snapshots published were 0901, 0905, 0907 and 0908.

Trying out openSUSE Tumbleweed

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Reviews
SUSE

While distribution-hopping is common among newcomers to Linux, longtime users tend to settle into a distribution they like and stay put thereafter. In the end, Linux distributions are more alike than different, and one's time is better spent getting real work done rather than looking for a shinier version of the operating system. Your editor, however, somehow never got that memo; that's what comes from ignoring Twitter, perhaps. So there is a new distribution on the main desktop machine; this time around it's openSUSE Tumbleweed.

Most rational users simply want a desktop system that works, is secure, and, hopefully, isn't too badly out of date. Tumbleweed is not intended for those users; instead, it is good for people who like to be on the leading edge with current versions of everything and who are not afraid of occasional breakage. It's for users who like an occasional surprise from their operating system. That sounds like just the sort of distribution your editor actively seeks out.

More to the point, Tumbleweed is a rolling distribution; rather than make regular releases that are months or years apart, the Tumbleweed developers update packages individually as new releases come out upstream. Unlike development distributions like Rawhide, Tumbleweed does not contain pre-release software. By waiting to ship a release until it has been declared stable upstream, Tumbleweed should be able to avoid the worst unpleasant surprises while keeping up with what the development community is doing.

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HP Enterprise Names SUSE (Not Red Hat) Preferred Linux Partner

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SUSE

Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) is playing favorites in the Linux market, selecting SUSE rather than Red Hat and Canonical Ubuntu as the company’s preferred Linux distribution partner. The move, in theory, could potentially trigger a ripple effect across corporate data centers worldwide — especially for customers that are deploying OpenStack private clouds.

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Mageia and OpenSUSE Updates

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MDV
SUSE
  • Dandifying Mageia – Adding the DNF stack to Mageia

    There’s a lot of good things coming to Mageia 6: KDE Plasma 5 desktop, updates to other desktop environments, many new games, and a fresh coat of paint with a new visual style. However, there’s quite a lot of under-the-hood improvements in Mageia, too!

    Among the many less-than-visible improvements across the board is a brand new dependency resolver: DNF. DNF (Dandified Yum) is a next generation dependency resolver and high-level package management tool with an interesting history. DNF traces its ancestry to two projects: Fedora’s Yum (Yellowdog Updater, Modified) and openSUSE’s SAT Solver (libsolv). DNF was forked from Yum several years ago in order to rewrite it to use the SAT Solver library from openSUSE (which is used in their own tool, Zypper). Another goal of the fork was to massively restructure the codebase so that a sane API would be available for both extending DNF (via plugins and hooks) and building applications on top of it (such as graphical frontends and system lifecycle automation frameworks).

  • Mageia To Offer DNF, But Will Keep Using URPMI By Default

    The RPM-based Mageia Linux distribution has decided to offer Fedora's DNF forked version of Yum in their next major release.

    While Mageia 6 will be offering dnf, it's not going to be the default but will just be present on the system for those wanting to use it. The urpmi command and Mageia's existing software management tools will remain the defaults for the "foreseeable future."

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Now Based on Linux Kernel 4.7.2, VirtualBox 5.1.4 Lands Too

    The openSUSE Project, through Douglas DeMaio, is glad to inform the openSUSE Tumbleweed community about the new package updates and improvements incorporated in the snapshots released during the week that passed.

    Now that some of you are probably attempting to install the first Beta ISOs of the upcoming openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system, which promises to offer a strong, secure, and very stable GNU/Linux distributions to pragmatic and conservative users, those who use the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling release are enjoying the latest software releases and technologies.

  • Akonadi/KMail issues on Tumbleweed?

OpenSUSE Releases Leap Beta

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SUSE
  • openSUSE 42.2 Pushed Back as Beta is Released
  • Throw a Beta Pizza Party
  • openSUSE Releases Leap Beta, Modifies Road Map

    Software testers and Linux enthusiasts can now get the Beta release of openSUSE Leap 42.2, which was released today.

    “Leap is for pragmatic and conservative technology adopters,” said Ludwig Nussel, the release manager for openSUSE Leap. “Testing the beta helps make Leap even more mature, so we encourage as many people as possible to test it.”

    openSUSE Leap focuses on well-established packages, like systemd 228 and Qt 5.6. The release day for the official version is scheduled for Nov. 16, which is one week after SUSECon.

OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 Beta

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A new OpenSUSE Linux is coming to town, and it's all about stability

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SUSE

Linux users come in many shapes and sizes, but those in the business world typically steer clear of the bleeding edge. That's why the OpenSUSE project recently switched to a two-pronged development approach, with one version focused on constant updates and another on enterprise-grade stability. On Wednesday, the latter took a big step forward.

The first beta version of OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 is now available, giving enterprises and other stability-minded users the chance to check it out and get a taste of what's coming in the final release, which is due Nov. 16. This is the first key update to the Leap software since OpenSUSE adopted its dual-path approach late last year with OpenSUSE 42.1.

“Leap is for pragmatic and conservative technology adopters,” Ludwig Nussel, the release manager for OpenSUSE Leap, said in the software's official announcement. “Testing the beta helps make Leap even more mature, so we encourage as many people as possible to test it.”

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Dutch govt should consider sharing all its software
    The Dutch government is to create a vision document on how all software developed for and by public administrations can be made available as open source. On Tuesday, the Lower House of the Dutch Parliament agreed that sharing software developed for or by the government has significant benefits, including information security, efficiency and openness.
  • Communicating To The World: Why Open-Source Could Help Your Small Business
    Just as groundbreaking advancements in technology in the ‘90s and 2000s have fundamentally changed the way film, music and television are produced and distributed today, more recent tech innovations have also provided entrepreneurs with the tools they need to compete in the global marketplace. Here is a look at some of the open-source solutions that you can use in order to realize your entrepreneurial ambitions. [...] The rise of high quality open-source web utilities has made it possible for anyone with even a rudimentary understanding of web design to make a quality site. In fact, open-source content management systems like WordPress are so easy to use and comprehensive, companies like Best Buy and Xerox use them to maintain their web presences. Additionally, open-source business management and accounting program Solegis, customer relationship management app ConcourseSuite and e-commerce solution Zen Cart all exist to empower entrepreneurs with limited resources.
  • What lies ahead for open source technology in 2017?
    2016 has been a polarising year. A year when the unexpected and largely unpredicted has occurred, shocking people worldwide. We have lurched into a post-truth era, where emotion transcends logic, and maintaining the status quo is no longer a given. Change is inevitable and there are vast swathes of global society who are disappointed and apprehensive about what lies ahead. In times of uncertainty, an increased focus on collaboration and community is appealing and desirable. The internet has long been a polarising force, a connecting platform that allows individuals to find kindred spirits they might not have been able to find before, regardless of their allegiances and views.
  • Financial tech-ops chief: open source is a recruitment talent imperative
    Developers don’t want to take what companies tell them at face value: they want to look under the bonnet, and assess the quality and design of the code for themselves. If you want to win credibility among the developer community and encourage the right people to your brand, you need to share your work and demonstrate best practice, not just talk about it. The benefits to an open source approach don’t end with the positive impression it can help foster among developers.
  • Speaking in Tech: Did an open source guru just ask us to join Amazon?
  • Family Farming and Open Source Wireless Networking
    Open source methods are being covered more often on television and radio these days, as witnessed by this recent story posted Monday on YouTube by CNBC that mentions Drupal-based Farm OS and covers the story of Dorn Cox, an organic grain grower at Tuckaway Farm in Lee NH; the Director of Green Start, an organization working towards food and fuel security; and co-founder of Farm Hack, an open source community for resilient agriculture.
  • WordPress 4.7 Provides Improved Customization
    WordPress 4.7 was released on December 6, providing the tens of millions of internet users that rely on it, with a long list of new features. As always with every new major WordPress milestone, there is a new theme. For WordPress 4.7 the new theme is Twenty Seventeen, which provides users with video headers and features images.
  • Open Compliance in the Enterprise: Why Have an Open Source Compliance Program?
    Traditionally, platforms and software stacks were implemented using proprietary software, and consisted of various software building blocks that originated as a result of internal development or via third-party software providers with negotiated licensing terms. The business environment was predictable and companies mitigated potential risks through license and contract negotiations with the software vendors. It was very easy to know who was the provider for every software component.
  • Why You Should Have a Personal CI Server
    As a developer, I rely on a CI server to take care of the day-to-day routine of building, testing and deploying software...so much so that I often find myself committing code after every new class or group of methods as a “fire and forget” signal to the CI server to go ahead and run my tests, check my code for style violations, and push a new version to the dev server. When I have finished my train of thought, I can jump into the CI server and either be greeted with a green tick or have a handy (and more importantly authoritative) list of issues to be addressed. However, for all the convenience that a central CI server brings, there are times when this environment lets me down. Maybe my jobs are at the end of the queue, I can’t deploy to the dev servers during a certain time frame, or the configuration of the build just doesn’t quite do what I want it to do but I don’t have the authority to change it.

Leftovers: Software

  • grep-2.27 released
    There have been 40 commits by 4 people in the 9 weeks since 2.26. Note that there were many additional important changes via gnulib.
  • GCC 6.3 Should Be Here By Christmas
    For those looking toward the next maintenance release of GCC 6, the GNU Compiler Collection 6.3 is aiming to be out by Christmas.
  • Yum! GNOME Recipes is a New Cooking App for Linux
    Do you like to cook? No, me neither. And that’s largely because I don’t know how to cook. Could a desktop cooking app help? GNOME’s Matthias Clasen is hoping so, and has started work on a brand-new desktop recipe app that you — and anyone you know — can help contribute to.
  • Heron Animation, Free Stop Motion Software for Linux
    Looking for free stop motion animation software? If so, you’ll definitely want to check out Heron Animation. A free program, Heron Animation lets you take a series of pictures from a connected webcam and assemble each shot into a real moving animation. The tool, which is written in web technologies, pitches itself as ‘perfect for beginners and more experienced animators alike’. That sort of balance is notoriously hard to achieve.
  • EasyTAG 2.4.3 Audio Tag Editor Supports MP4 Files with the .aac File Extension
    EasyTAG, an open-source, simple, free, and cross-platform application for viewing and editing tags in audio files, supporting MP3, MP4, FLAC, Ogg, MusePack, Monkey's Audio, and WavPack files, was updated to version 2.4.3. It's been more than nine months since EasyTAG 2.4.2 was released, and we're now finally able to update the software on our GNU/Linux or Windows operating systems. Version 2.4.3 is out as of December 5, 2016, bringing support for MP4 files that use the .aac file extension, as well as Adwaita-style artist and album icons.
  • FSF Blogs: Seventeen new GNU releases in November
  • IceCat 45.5.1 release
    GNUzilla is the GNU version of the Mozilla suite, and GNU IceCat is the GNU version of the Firefox browser. Its main advantage is an ethical one: it is entirely free software. While the Firefox source code from the Mozilla project is free software, they distribute and recommend non-free software as plug-ins and addons. Also their trademark license restricts distribution in several ways incompatible with freedom 0.
  • Permabit Hits New Milestone in 2016 by Delivering the First Complete Data Reduction for Linux
  • FOSS DOS for 21st Century Hardware
    The founder and coordinator of the FreeDOS Project writes about FreeDOS 1.2, which is scheduled for a Christmas Day release. There is good news for classic gamers and nostalgia buffs: this one’s got games.
  • A Look At Async/Await JavaScript For Firefox 52
    While Chrome 55 has JavaScript async/await support, the Firefox support isn't coming until the Firefox 52.0 stable release in March while currently it's available in the latest Firefox Developer Edition and early alpha builds. Mozilla developer Dan Callahan wrote a post today on hacks.mozilla.org for the async/await support in Firefox and can be used if you are running the latest Firefox Developer Edition. Check it out if you're interested in JavaScript async await support for more asynchronous programming for the web.
  • Chrome bug triggered errors on websites using Symantec SSL certificates
  • Announcing openSUSE’s GPG Key Server – keyserver.opensuse.org
    Does it happen to you, too, that there are moments where you ask yourself why others want something from you that is there already since a while? Exactly this happened with https://keyserver.opensuse.org/: the original machine was set up a long time ago to make it easier for people attending the openSUSE GPG key-signing parties, but it looks like nobody officially announced this “new service” for our users… …and so here we are: the openSUSE Heroes team is pleased to announce that keyserver.opensuse.org is up and running as public GPG keyserver. We are of course also part of the official keyserver pool, which means that some people might already noticed us, as they got redirected to our server with their requests. (And for those who are interested to setup their own SKS keyserver: we have also written a nice monitoring plugin that helps you keeping an eye on the pool status of your machine and the ones of your peers.)

Office Suites

  • Microsoft Office, Google Docs beware: This open-source startup is after your users
    "That was one of the reasons why we chose an open-source model. We want be open, want people to trust us, want to overcome that barrier they have in mind, those strong beliefs that there's nothing but Microsoft Office, that nothing better could be created. We won't change our mind about open source." Bannov says he ultimately sees OnlyOffice becoming a firm that provides consulting, technical support and remote managed services to companies using its open-source products.
  • Collabora Online 2.0 Puts LibreOffice In the Cloud, Adds Collaborative Editing
    Today, December 7, 2016, Collabora Productivity, through Michael Meeks, is proud to inform Softpedia about the general availability of the long anticipated Collabora Online 2.0 office suite based on the LibreOffice, Nextcloud, and ownCloud technologies. After being in development for the past six months, Collabora Online 2.0 is finally here as the powerful cloud-based office suite that promises to protect users' privacy and freedom of expression while editing various documents formats online. Collabora Online is mainly targeted at the enterprise world, hosting and cloud businesses.

Leftovers: Ubuntu