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SUSE

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Heroes meeting, day 2

    After a long, but exciting first day, we even managed to get some sleep before we started again and discussed the whole morning about our policies and other stuff that is now updated in the openSUSE wiki. After that, we went out for a nice lunch…

  • Installing Tumbleweed, November 2016

    The Tumbleweed system that I already have installed had desktops KDE, Gnome, XFCE and LXDE. But for recent intstalls (as with Leap 42.2), I have been going with KDE, Gnome, XFCE, LXQt, FVWM and MATE. So it seemed reasonable for the new Tumbleweed install to follow the same path. I also added Enlightenment for experimenting.

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/48

    After releasing daily snapshots without interruption for 17 days, Tumbleweed did slow down a bit during the last week. As already mentioned in my last review, 1124 had been canceled due to an issue with sddm installing strange branding configurations. And later on, we ‘broke’ our own staging setup and needed to bootstrap a few of them, making the throughput much lower than you were used to. So, we ended up with 3 snapshots since my last review: 1125, 1128 and 1129.

  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 28

    November is over, Santa Claus elves start to stress and the YaST team brings you one of the last reports of 2016. Let’s see what’s new in YaSTland.

openSUSE Tumbleweed Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.8.10, VirtualBox 5.1.10 Lands

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SUSE

Today, December 1, 2016, openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio gladly informed the community of the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system about the updated packages that landed in the repositories.

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SUSE buys HPE’s OpenStack and Cloud Foundry assets

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SUSE

SUSE, which probably is best known for its Linux distribution, has long been a quiet but persistent player in the OpenStack ecosystem. Over the last few months, though, the German company has also emerged as one of the stronger competitors in this world, especially now that we are seeing a good bit of consolidation around OpenStack.

Today, SUSE announced that it is acquiring OpenStack and Cloud Foundry (the Platform-as-a-Service to OpenStack’s Infrastructure-as-a-Service) assets and talent from the troubled HPE. This follows HPE’s decision to sell off (or “spin-merge” in HPE’s own language) its software business (including Autonomy, which HP bought for $11 billion, followed by a $9 billion write-off) to Micro Focus. And to bring this full circle: Micro Focus also owns SUSE, and SUSE is now picking up HPE’s OpenStack and Cloud Foundry assets.

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Also: SUSE acquires HPE OpenStack and Cloud Foundry assets

openSUSE 42.2 Leap

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SUSE

openSUSE is a community distribution which shares code and infrastructure with SUSE Linux Enterprise. The openSUSE distribution is available in two editions. The first is a stable, point release edition with a conservative base called Leap. The second edition is an experimental rolling release called Tumbleweed. The openSUSE project recently released a new update to the Leap edition, launching openSUSE 42.2 Leap in mid-November. Leap editions receive approximately three years of security updates and minor point releases are published about once per year. The new 42.2 release includes a long term support kernel (Linux 4.4) and KDE's Plasma 5.8 desktop which is also supposed to receive long term support from its upstream project.

openSUSE 42.2 is available primarily for 64-bit x86 computers. There are ARM ports available, but they need to be tracked down through the project's wiki and are not available through the main Download page. The new release is available in two builds, a 4.1GB DVD and a 95MB net-install disc. I opted to download the larger of the two ISO files for my trial.

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HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.11 Supports openSUSE Leap 42.2 and Fedora 25

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Linux
Red Hat
SUSE

Today, November 28, 2016, the developers behind the HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) software, an open source print, scan and fax driver solution for HP printers and scanners on Linux-based operating systems, announced the release of HPLIP 3.16.11.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets Linux Kernel 4.8.9, CMake 3.7, Firefox 50 & Mesa 13.0.1

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SUSE

Users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling distribution should be happy to hear that the repositories were flooded this week with hundreds of updated packages.

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SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • Tumbleweed Delivers Incredible Snapshot Streak, Newest Kernel

    News of Linux releases are getting most of the headlines during November while snapshots of openSUSE Tumbleweed have subtly been flying under the radar.

    Other than Nov. 3 and Nov. 6, openSUSE Tumbleweed had updated software snapshots released every day this month.

    The last update on news.opensuse.org included snapshot 20161108 and the 13 snapshots that have followed that have included hundreds of new packages.

  • Crowd-funding sought for first Linux tablet

    Missouri-based technology firm MJ Technology has begun a crowd-funding campaign on Indiegogo to raise US$100,000 to build the first tablets that run GNU/Linux.

    The eight developers/engineers, who make up the firm, aim to make a tablet that runs the 64-bit version of the community Linux distribution, openSUSE.

OpenSUSE Leap 42.1 vs. Leap 42.2 vs. Tumbleweed Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks
SUSE

For those curious how openSUSE Leap 42.2, which was released last week, compares performance-wise to Leap 42.1 and the rolling-release openSUSE Tumbleweed, here are some benchmarks today for your viewing pleasure. Also included with this openSUSE performance comparison was Intel's Clear Linux distribution as an independent metric of a distribution that's generally among the fastest thanks to the aggressive optimizations by default.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel Space/Linux

Red Hat News

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want. Read more Also: Google Summer of Code 2017

Graphics in Linux

  • 17 Fresh AMDGPU DC Patches Posted Today
    Seventeen more "DC" display code patches were published today for the AMDGPU DRM driver, but it's still not clear if it will be ready -- or accepted -- for Linux 4.12. AMD developers posted 17 new DC (formerly known as DAL) patches today to provide small fixes for Vega10/GFX9 hardware, various internal code changes, CP2520 DisplayPort compliance, and various small fixes.
  • libinput 1.7.0
  • Libinput 1.7 Released With Support For Lid Switches, Scroll Wheel Improvements
    Peter Hutterer has announced the new release of libinput 1.7.0 as the input handling library most commonly associated with Wayland systems but also with Ubuntu's Mir as well as the X.Org Server via the xf86-input-libinput driver.
  • Nouveau TGSI Shader Cache Enabled In Mesa 17.1 Git
    Building off the work laid by Timothy Arceri and others for enabling a TGSI (and hardware) shader cache in the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver as well as R600g TGSI shader cache due ot the common infrastructure work, the Nouveau driver is now leveraging it to enable the TGSI shader cache for Nouveau Gallium3D drivers.