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SUSE

OpenSUSE Leap 42.1 - Leap? More of a plunge.

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Reviews
SUSE

On paper, openSUSE Leap 42.1, with SLE stability and three years of support, kernel 4.1 and Plasma 5.4, tons of good software, and community repos sounds like a blazing good deal, a dream come true, the Linux Nirvana. In reality, it is nothing of the sort.

Package management works, but you don't get all the software you need plus conflicts, codecs are broken, network connectivity is half-broken, smartphone support is average, resource utilization is high. The distro works, but it gives you no love. It is far from being the beautiful, exciting, amazing product that I expected, the kind that reigned supreme in the SUSE 10 and 11 days. Ah, how I miss them.

Overall, despite being stable, i.e. non-crashy, openSUSE 42.1 is hardly usable as a day-to-day distro. If you value your software, media and gadgets, then this operating system will frustrate you. Xubuntu Vivid or Mint Rafaela are much better choices. Faster, leaner, just as beautiful, and they actually give you everything you need, without any bugs or problems. This autumn season turns out to be one of the worst I've ever had, and it makes me wanna blowtorch a few keyboards. Almost anything and everything I tested so far sucks to a high or very high degree. Present company included. OpenSUSE 42.1, one small step for SUSE, one giant leap for failure. 4/10.

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  • openSUSE Leap 42.1 DVD, 32-bit Linux distributions and the Toshiba NB520

    OpenSUSE has been my go-to distribution for my dated Toshiba NB520. My sturdy 3 year old Toshiba netbook doesn't support Gnome 3 or Ubuntu Unity due to hardware limitations, but the last three releases of openSUSE KDE handled every piece of hardware on the NB520 without issues. OpenSUSE Leap 42.1's DVD has only an x86-64 release as of this writing, though 32-bit users can always install Tumbleweed, openSUSE's well-reviewed rolling release. Tumbleweed has installation media for 32-bit machines and if you're still running a previous 32-bit release of openSUSE, you can always run the upgrade procedure to Tumbleweed.

  • Notes on installing openSUSE Leap 42.1

    If you selected the options to Add Online Repositories Before Installation and Include Add-on Products from Separate Media during the installation process using the openSUSE Leap 42.1 DVD, the setup process might stall midway.

American Megatrends (AMI) Joins SUSE Linux’s 64-bit ARM Partner Program

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SUSE

American Megatrends Inc. (AMI), a hardware and software company that specializes in BIOS and UEFI firmware, PC hardware, data storage products, remote and server management tools, as well as unique solutions powered by Linux and Android, was proud to announce that it has joined SUSE's 64-bit ARM Partner Program.

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OpenSUSE LEAP: A Great Free Linux Server Distribution

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Reviews
SUSE

So what exactly is LEAP? What’s it for? The easiest way to approach something like OpenSUSE LEAP is to think of it like a beefed-up, more stable Fedora-type thing. The main goal of this Linux distribution is to create an enterprise grade distribution designed for workstations and servers free of charge.

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Also: I accidentally openSUSE

openSUSE Developers Discuss the Removal of Custom Artwork for KDE Plasma 5

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SUSE

openSUSE developer Luca Beltrame started a new discussion on the openSUSE mailing list where he explains some facts regarding the future of custom themes for the KDE Plasma desktop environment used in the openSUSE Linux distribution.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets Wine 1.8 RC2, VirtualBox 5.0.10, and GDM 3.18.2

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SUSE

Dominique Leuenberger informs users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling-release operating system about the release of two news snapshots, which include several updated applications and a few other under-the-hood improvements.

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Tumbleweed changes fonts, Leap gets several updates

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SUSE

Tumbleweed had one snapshot so far this week that brought more appeal to users of openSUSE.

Snapshot 20151123 changed fonts for openSUSE. The terminal font changed to Adobe Code Pro and Roboto was also added as the default font.

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What happened with Suse Linux Enterprise Server?

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OS
Linux
SUSE

It had been years since I installed Suse Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) for development and testing purposes. I recently loaded SLES 12 to port RapidDisk as a precompiled RPM for the distribution and what a disaster that was. What happened to this distribution? Read more here.

openSUSE Leap 42.1 + Cinnamon, XFCE, or Budgie = GeckoLinux

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Linux
News
SUSE

GeckoLinux is based on openSUSE Leap 42.1, and it exists to make the openSUSE distribution more refined and approachable. It has recently released live installable DVD editions featuring the Cinnamon, XFCE, and Budgie desktop environments. These include many refinements and features not available in the standard openSUSE Leap installation images.

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openSUSE Leap bring SUSE Linux Enterprise out in the open

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SUSE

SUSE has been doing things very, very right for a very long time. It never ceases to amaze me that this brilliant company hasn't found more traction in the US. Hopefully openSUSE LEAP will be that which will help them leap in the spotlight here in the States.

Do you SUSE? Will you LEAP?

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Leaping in a new direction with openSUSE 42.1

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Reviews
SUSE

Of the three distributions, I think Fedora is closest to the cutting edge, with openSUSE and Ubuntu both fairly close behind. However, Fedora and Ubuntu have relatively short support cycles with Fedora releases usually supported for about 14 months, Ubuntu 15.10 for just nine months and openSUSE 42.1 will receive three years of support.

The best distribution for the job will depend on the person and, of course, the role the distribution is to play. I think Fedora is aimed mostly at more technical users and people who like to tinker. Ubuntu is aimed squarely at Linux newcomers who generally want to just use their computer and openSUSE appears to be aiming at a sort of middle ground: people who have a little Linux experience and want options, but also want reliability and longer support cycles.

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