Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

SUSE

OpenMandriva Beta Postponed, YaST Gone Ruby

Filed under
MDV
SUSE

ostatic.com: Since last week's server issues over at the OpenMandriva camp, the beta has been delayed a bit as well as overshadowing what would have been an anniversary announcement. In the meantime, over at the openSUSE project, YaST Developer Lukas Ocilka blogged today that the migration of YaST to Ruby is complete.

62 Top500 supercomputers run SUSE

Filed under
SUSE

novell.com: The recently released November Top500 list once again demonstrates that Linux dominates HPC – nearly 90 percent of the Top500 systems run on Linux. Sixty-two of the supercomputers are proven to run some version (including such variants as UNICOS/lc and CNL) of SUSE Linux Enterprise from Novell.

Also: SUSE's George Shi Explains Linux Enterprise 11 SP3 Role in Mission-Critical Computing

openSUSE 13.1 Milestone 3 Arrives

Filed under
SUSE

ostatic.com: The latest milestone on the road to 13.1 was released today with less dramatic changes, as milestones are, according to Andres Silva. This release features GNOME 3.10 and KDE 4.11 betas, GCC was upgraded to 4.8, and the kernel is now 3.10.0.

Announcing the openSUSE Summit 2013

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: While everyone is certainly looking forward to the upcoming openSUSE Conference in Thessaloniki, Greece (only a few days away) it is not too early to cast our view just a bit into the future and also get excited about our second openSUSE Summit.

MS and Linux at Loggerheads is History: Peter Lees, Suse

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Interviews
SUSE

computerworld.in: A decade ago, businesses debated deploying Linux or not. The discussion has now moved to which Linux to use.

Jos Poortvliet on openSUSE Merchandising

Filed under
SUSE

lizards.opensuse.org: This week, we have team member Jos Poortvliet talk about what he’s been working on in the merchandising area.

What's new in SUSE Linux Enterprise 11 SP3

Filed under
SUSE

h-online.com: Service Pack 3 includes numerous enhancements for virtualisation and, by adding Secure Boot support and new drivers, beefs up support for newer hardware. There are also numerous enhancements relating to server storage and networking.

SUSE to support SUSE Studio customized Linux distros

Filed under
SUSE

zdnet.com: SUSE Studio lets anyone quickly create their own customized Linux distribution and now SUSE is willing to give these distros commercial support.

Analysis of openSUSE Factory Developers and Users

Filed under
SUSE

tux.gseis.ucla.edu: The Factory distribution is the current state of the development for the next openSUSE release. The development releases of the openSUSE distribution like Milestones or Release Candidates are snapshots from this distribution. There is constant work going on in Factory. Every time a developer submits a fix, update, new feature or package it is rebuilt. So the Factory repository can be in any state and is a moving target. In this paper we analyze the evolution of sentiment of the developers and users over a 27 month period.

openSUSE is Configuration Torture

Filed under
SUSE

asimplediscipleslife.blogspot: I was having a lot of crashes with Linux Mint 14 on my laptop, so I considered trying a distro I didn't try yet. So I went for openSUSE. I regret it.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Edubuntu Vs UberStudent: Return To College With The Best Linux Distro

Importantly, there are a handful of programs that are on Edubuntu that UberStudent doesn’t have, such as KAlgebra, Kazium, KGeography, and Marble. Instead, UberStudent has a smaller collection of applications but it does include some useful items when it comes to writing papers that Edubuntu does not have. So ultimately, Edubuntu includes more programs that are information-heavy, while UberStudent includes more tools that can aid students in their studies but doesn’t directly give them any sort of information. Read more

Zotac Nvidia Jetson TK1 review

The Jetson TK1, Nvidia’s first development board to be marketed at the general public, has taken a circuitous route to our shores. Unveiled at the company’s Graphics Technology Conference earlier this year, the board launched in the US at a headline-grabbing price of $192 but its international release was hampered by export regulations. Zotac, already an Nvidia partner for its graphics hardware, volunteered to sort things out and has partnered with Maplin to bring the board to the UK. In doing so, however, the price has become a little muddled. $192 – a clever dollar per GPU core – has become £199.99. Compared to Maplin’s other single-board computer, the sub-£30 Raspberry Pi, it’s a high-end item that could find itself priced out of the reach of the company’s usual customers. Read more

New Human Interface Guidelines for GNOME and GTK+

I’ve recently been hard at work on a new and updated version of the GNOME Human Interface Guidelines, and am pleased to announce that this will be ready for the upcoming 3.14 release. Over recent years, application design has evolved a huge amount. The web and native applications have become increasingly similar, and new design patterns have become the norm. During that period, those of us in the GNOME Design Team have worked with developers to expand the range of GTK+’s capabilities, and the result is a much more modern toolkit. Read more