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SUSE

openSUSE 12.2 Review: an Immaculate Conception

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SUSE

opensuseadventures.blogspot: When I first updated my computer to 12.2 I wasn't all that impressed, but that was apparently due to having used the live upgrade via 'zypper dup.' Earlier today (December 20th) I got fed up with some of the anomalies and accumulated mess of my system, and decided to reinstall.

openSUSE 12.3 preview

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SUSE

linuxbsdos.com: openSUSE 12.3 Milestone 2 was released two days ago, a month after Milestone 1 was released. The final edition, openSUSE 12.3, is not expected until around the ides of March 2013, so a milestone release offers a good opportunity to see what goodies will be on the final version.

SUSE Linux Says Btrfs is Ready to Roll

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SUSE

linux.com: The advanced Butter/Better/B-tree Filesystem, Btrfs, is still labeled as experimental. Most distros include Btrfs, and Btrfs has been included in mainline Linux kernels since the 2.6.29 kernel. To use it just install the user-space tools. So what's the story, is it ready for prime time or not?

OpenSUSE's Jos Poortvliet: Collaborate or Become Obsolete

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Interviews
SUSE

linuxinsider.com: Last month, Jos Poortvliet's job as openSUSE community manager brought his career full-circle. Poortvliet now has a decade of evangelism for the free software movement as well as a unique perspective on the open source community.

Half Of The World's Largest Supercomputer Clusters Run SUSE

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Interviews
SUSE

muktware.com: Andreas Jaeger was recently appointed as product manager of SUSE so we talked to him about his new role, the relationship between SUSE and the openSUSE community and SUSE's emergence after being sold and much more.

Looking Over OpenSUSE 12.2

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SUSE

beginlinux.com: Better late than never, openSUSE 12.2 arrived in September 2012, having first been scheduled for July. It comes in both Gnome and KDE flavors with pretty much all the software you could want (the full DVD version weighs in at 4.7GB, with lighter weight CD-sized options for each of KDE and Gnome).

Trying openSUSE

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SUSE
  • Trying OpenSuse
  • Secure Boot on openSUSE, a battleplan
  • New theme for KDE openSUSE 12.3 is now in!
  • while doing some MATE packages…

Long-Term Review: openSUSE 12.2 KDE

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SUSE

dasublogbyprashanth.blogspot: I did this long-term review on my normal UROP desktop computer with the 64-bit edition of the OS.

openSUSE 12.3 Milestone 1 KDE 4.9.2

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SUSE

vazhavandan.blogspot: After taking a peek at openSUSE 12.3 Milestone 1 GNOME 3.6 earlier i was curious as to how KDE 4.9 is coming along in openSUSE 12.3 Milestone 1.

openSUSE 12.3 Milestone 1 GNOME 3.6

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SUSE

vazhavandan.blogspot: The Green Team has released openSUSE 12.3 Milestone 1 and it does include GNOME 3.6 as expected. openSUSE 12.3 is code named Dartmouth.

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Phoronix on NVIDIA

  • Compute Shader Support Patches For NVIDIA Fermi On Nouveau
    Samuel Pitoiset has published a set of twelve patches for implementing compute shaders support within the Nouveau NVC0 Gallium3D driver for the GeForce 400/500 "Fermi" graphics processors.
  • NVIDIA Posts Latest PRIME Sync Patches On Road To Better Support
    Alex Goins of NVIDIA has spent the past several months working on PRIME synchronization support to fix tearing when using this NVIDIA-popular multi-GPU method. The latest patches were published this week.
  • The Best Graphics Card Brands For NVIDIA/AMD GPUs As A Linux Consumer?
    One of the most frequent topics I'm emailed about is any brand recommendations among NVIDIA and AMD AIB partners for graphics cards. For Linux users, is there a particular brand preference for graphics cards? The short story is, no, there isn't one particular brand when selecting either a GeForce or Radeon graphics card that a Linux gamer/enthusiast should go with over another AIB partner. Over the past 12 years of running Phoronix, there has been no single AIB partner that superbly stands out compared to the rest when it comes to graphics card AIB partner brands like ASUS, Zotac, HIS, MSI, etc. They all work under Linux, rarely the AIB differences extend beyond the heatsink/cooler and any default clock speed differences, and I haven't seen one that's over-the-top crazy about Linux. I also haven't seen any major partner consistently put the Tux logo or other Linux markings on their product packaging, let alone incorporate any Linux drivers onto their CD/DVD driver media.