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SUSE

What’s new in SUSE LINUX 12?

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SUSE

It’s been more than five years since SUSE delivered its last full release, and a lot has happened to the company during that time. In our testing we find that SUSE Linux 12 has been worth the wait. SUSE 12 is a broad set of Linux distributions ranging from desktop through enterprise level. We tested several instances and found them quite ready for enterprise use. All in all, SUSE 12 is a worthy competitor to Red Hat and Ubuntu in the enterprise Linux market.

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Wipro, SUSE Work Together on OpenStack Cloud Tools, Services

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SUSE

Wipro Ltd. has announced that it has jointly developed with SUSE an OpenStack cloud solution based on Wipro's own open source cloud tools and SUSE Cloud, SUSE’s enterprise OpenStack cloud platform which is integrated with a cloud management layer, stitching private and public cloud layers together. Here are more details.

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MariaDB Enterprise adds Suse Linux and IBM Power8 support

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OSS
SUSE

MARIADB LAUNCHED the latest release of MariaDB Enterprise on Tuesday with support for tailored software configuration notifications and IBM Power8 hardware systems as well as Suse Linux distributions.

"MariaDB Enterprise's new Notification Service means that crawling through lengthy change logs and wondering if the latest security vulnerability will affect database performance are in the past," the firm said.

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openSUSE 12.3 Is Approaching End of Life Fast

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SUSE

openSUSE 12.3 is now very close to reach End of Life and the support cycle will be terminated in a few weeks time, meaning no more updates will be provided for the aging operating system.

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With Btrfs the default on openSUSE, when will other distros follow suit

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SUSE

One change that was implemented in openSUSE 13.2 makes Btrfs the default file system for the root (main) partition. That makes openSUSE the first desktop distribution to use Btrfs as a default file system for any partition.

That should be encouraging news for the Btrfs development team, because the core of Btrfs has been marked as “no longer unstable” for sometime. In some circles, that means production-ready. In fact a few companies have been using Btrfs in their products, including Facebook, which was testing it in production in April (2014)

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SUSE invests in software-defined storage

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OSS
SUSE

SUSE, the enterprise Linux company, is working on its own storage solution using open-source Ceph: SUSE Storage.

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OpenSUSE 13.2 KDE Edition : Video Overview and Screenshot Tours

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KDE
SUSE

According to OpenSUSE 13. official announcement, KDE 4.14, dedicated to the memory of Volker Lanz, provides a familiar look, feel and functionality with the rock-solid stability of the latest version of the long-term support Plasma Workspace (4.11.12) and the applications from latest Software Compilation (4.14.2). The KDE Telepathy stack offers features as off-the-record (OTR) encryption for instant messaging, multi-protocol support and a set of applets for the Plasma Workspace. KDE applications requiring multimedia are now based on the 1.0 version of the GStreamer multimedia framework, allowing a noticeable reduction in dependencies.

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OpenSUSE 13.2 review - Back in the game!

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Reviews
SUSE

Finally. After three and a half years of sucking, openSUSE is a top performance once again. This is an excellent all-around distribution, and it comes with some neat solutions both over and underneath the hood. You can't deny its amazing looks, and with the 13.2 release, performance, functionality and stability are back.

Now, openSUSE 13.2 has its problems. The screenshot thingie, subvolume handling, missing Samba printing option, plus that one inexplicable crash, which is probably the most serious item. And because of it, the final grade shall be lower. But all combined, the woes pale against the quality and general goodness radiating from this edition. Really, if you ignore the initial setup, and the one time freeze, there's very little not to like about openSUSE 13.2. I'm pleased. And feeling somewhat fanboyish. But this is good.

Anyhow, if you're looking for a non-Ubuntu family release that can offer you a great blend and balance between looks, modernity, functionality, stability, and performance, then you have several worthy candidates to consider. CentOS is one of them, and now openSUSE has returned, mighty and strong, and sanity has been restored into the distro world, where for many years, there's been an almost total dominance by Mint and Ubuntu, with everyone else lagging behind. OpenSUSE 13.2 is definitely worth testing and exploring. Final grade, something like 9/10, and this is with a whole 0.5 point taken off. So it's good. Do it.

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A brilliant mind: SUSE's kernel guru speaks

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Interviews
SUSE

The man who in every sense sits at the nerve centre of SUSE Linux has no airs about him. At 38, Vojtěch Pavlík is disarmingly frank and often seems a bit embarrassed to talk about his achievements, which are many and varied.

He is every bit a nerd, but can be candid, though precise. As director of SUSE Labs, it would be no exaggeration to call him the company's kernel guru. Both recent innovations that have come from SUSE - patching a live kernel, technology called kGraft, and creating a means for booting openSUSE on machines locked down with secure boot, have been his babies.

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Lock-in a danger to open source, says SUSE official

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OSS
SUSE

If there is one aspect in the open source world that can prove detrimental, it is companies that indulge in lock-in to the extent possible, according to Gerald Pfeifer, senior director of product management at SUSE.

Speaking to iTWire on the sidelines of SUSECon 2014, the third annual conference of the Germany-based SUSE Linux, which is being held in Orlando, Florida this week, Pfeifer (lictured above) did not mention any companies by name, though he did make a passing reference to Oracle.

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Chromixium Adds Polish to Chrome

Chromixium is a new Linux distro that goes one big step further than the few existing distros catering to the Chrome OS. It one-ups Google's semi-proprietary Chrome OS locked into the popular Chromebook hardware. Read more

Leftovers: KDE Software

  • Interview with David Revoy
    I bought a tablet to start to paint digitally during this period. I didn’t know many things about software, so my first years of digital painting were made with Photoshop Elements (bundled with the tablet). With digital painting, I could experiment with many themes I could never have sold on canvas. Then I met online publishers interested in my digital art and started to work more and more as a digital painter with an official Photoshop licence, Corel Painter, etcetera. In 2003 I ended my career as a traditional painter when a client decided to buy my whole stock of canvas.
  • There and back again, an algorithm tale
    Implementing Qt data models is anything but fun. For that reason, I don’t blame anyone for writing a beginResetModel / endResetModel combo any time a more complex change has happened.
  • Google Summer of Code 2015 – Week One : The Joy Of The First Paycheck!
    What I have done till now is collect constellation artwork used in Stellarium, and complied a list of 3 stars for each constellation which would be used to position the constellation image in the sky map. I started coding and have written the ConstellationArt class declaration. Earlier I had included a Q_PROPERTY to make constellations fade in and out, but I was told that this would be difficult to achieve since KStars doesn’t use OpenGL. In any case, I think getting the constellations to display correctly in the sky is more important than making them fade. That could always be done at a later point of time.
  • Suggesting new ways: Kamoso 3.0 Technology Preview
    The world changes, and with it, we change too. For this new version of Kamoso we wanted to iterate what we’re presenting.

Carl Sagan's solar-powered spacecraft is in trouble

  • Carl Sagan's solar-powered spacecraft is in trouble
  • Software Glitch Pauses LightSail Test Mission
    But inside the spacecraft's Linux-based flight software, a problem was brewing. Every 15 seconds, LightSail transmits a telemetry beacon packet. The software controlling the main system board writes corresponding information to a file called beacon.csv. If you’re not familiar with CSV files, you can think of them as simplified spreadsheets—in fact, most can be opened with Microsoft Excel.

Ubuntu Touch OTA-4 Update to Let Users Import SIM Contacts

A fresh OTA update is being prepared for Ubuntu Touch, and it should land soon. Developers have released some of the most important improvements that will be implemented in the upcoming release. Read more