Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

SUSE

Enterprise Linux Showdown: SUSE Linux

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

SUSE combines tried and tested tools and build methodologies that make this Linux offering a favorite in corporate environments. At the same time, and thanks to openSUSE and the online services built around it, SUSE Linux can also be daring and exciting. Although it has had low points over its long history, the Linux community is lucky that SUSE Linux is still with us and still going strong.

Read more

SUSE releases SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2

Filed under
SUSE

While I was off fighting viruses, SUSE released an update to its SUSE Linux Enterprise 12, a popular business Linux operating environment. The focus of this service pack appears to be accelerating network performance, enhancing support for SAP applications and HANA, improving support for IBM Power architecture systems and other important improvements.

Read more

  • openSUSE Leap 42.2 Officially Released, Includes GNOME 3.20 & KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS

    The openSUSE Project had the pleasure of informing Softpedia today, November 16, 2016, about the general availability of the openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system for personal computers.

    Designed to offer users only well-established Open Source and GNU/Linux technologies, and built using the source code from the recently released SUSE Enterprise Linux (SLE) 12 Service Pack 2 (SP2) operating system, the second major update to the openSUSE Leap 42 open-source and free distribution is here after being in development for the past six months. There are numerous new features and updated components in openSUSE Leap 42.2, some of which Tumbleweed users are already enjoying.

  • Optimal Release for Linux Professionals Arrives with openSUSE Leap 42.2

    Members of the openSUSE Project are pleased to announce the release of the next minor version of Leap; openSUSE Leap 42.2! Leap is made to give stability-minded users and conservative technology adopters peace of mind. openSUSE Leap 42.2 is powered by the Linux 4.4 Long-Term-Support (LTS) kernel and is a secure, stable and reliable server operating system for deploying IT services in physical, virtual or cloud environments.

    A selective process of including well-established packages in openSUSE Leap 42.2 gives new meaning to the term Linux Optimization; openSUSE Leap is simply the safe choice that offers Linux professionals a user-friendly desktop and a feature-rich server environment.

  • OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 Arrives

    Hitting the web this morning is the official release of openSUSE Leap 42.2.

    OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 makes use of the older Linux 4.4 kernel due to its LTS status, makes use of the KDE Plasma 5.8 desktop by default, and a wide variety of other package updates. OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 continues to be derived from SUSE Linux Enterprise.

SUSE advances its open-source storage system

Filed under
SUSE

Besides announcing its next version of Ceph-powered SUSE Enterprise Storage, SUSE has bought openATTIC, the open-source Ceph and storage management framework.

Read more

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE

SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2 arrives

Filed under
SUSE

SUSE has long been a business Linux for business. With the arrival of SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLES) 12 Service Pack 2 , the first major update since last year, SUSE is staying the corporate Linux course.

Read more

Tyson Foods Honored as SUSE Customer of the Year

Filed under
SUSE

Every year, SUSE honors 4 companies worldwide, one in each region of the globe: Latin America, APAC, EMEA and North America. Recipient companies are recognized for “defining the future:” using SUSE open source solutions for IT transformation, increased business agility and continuity. 2016 award recipients are :

Read more

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • SUSE plans container as a service platform

    Germany-based SUSE Linux has announced a container as a service platform that it hopes to release as a public beta in April next year, before the first customer version comes out in July the same year.

    Three of the developers involved — Federica Teodori, project manager for container and orchestration, Andreas Jaeger, senior product manager, and Simona Arsene, product manager — spoke to iTWire about the technology on the sidelines of SUSECon 2016, the company's annual conference that is being held in Washington DC this week.

    Jaeger said the idea was to have a software-defined infrastructure where containers handled the workloads. The advantage was that containers, which include an application and its dependencies, could be moved around and could run from more than one location.

  • SUSE Deal Includes Ceph Storage Project
  • SUSE Growing Linux Biz Revenue at 18 percent in 2016

    According to Brauckmann, the fastest-growing route to market for SUSE now is the public cloud.

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Lands Mesa 13.0
  • openSUSE News: Mesa 13 Arrives in Tumbleweed with New Kernel

    This week has been a bit hectic with dramatic change affecting people around the world, but openSUSE Tumbleweed users who are use to change can find some clarity in the chaos with five snapshots that were released this week.

    These snapshots brought not only a new major version of Mesa but a new kernel and Plasma 5.8.3.

    The newest snapshot 20161108 updated yast2 to version 3.2.3 and added a patch to fix a crash from upstream for Wayland. Lightweight web browser epiphany, which updated to version 3.22.2 in the snapshot, added fixes for adblocker and improved the password form for autofill handling.

  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 27

    This week, during SUSECon 2016, SUSE announced an exciting upcoming new product. SUSE CASP – a Kubernetes based Container As a Service Platform.

    That has, of course, some implications for the installer, like the need of some products (like CASP) to specify a fixed configuration for some subsystems. For example, an established selection of packages. The user should not be allowed to change those fixed configurations during installation.

    We have implemented a possibility to mark some modules in the installation proposal as read-only. These read-only modules then cannot be started from the installer and therefore their configuration is kept at the default initial state.

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get Latest Linux Kernel, Mesa, and KDE Plasma Updates

Filed under
SUSE

Today, November 10, 2016, openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio reports on the latest updates brought by a total of four snapshots for the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling release Linux-based operating system.

Read more

Red Hat 'spy' makes appearance at SUSECon

Filed under
Red Hat
SUSE

The attendees at SUSECon 2016, the annual conference of the Germany-based SUSE Linux being held in Washington DC this week, fall into the usual well-known categories: employee, media, analyst, speaker etc.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Remembering Linux Installfests

Ah, yes. I remember the good old days when you had to be a real man or woman to install Linux, and the first time you tried you ended up saying something like “Help!” or maybe “Mommmmyyyyy!” Really, kids, that’s how it was. Stacks of floppies that took about 7,000 hours to download over your 16 baud connection. Times sure have changed, haven’t they? I remember Caldera advertising that their distribution autodetected 1,500 different monitors. I wrote an article titled “Monitor Number 1501,” because it didn’t detect my monitor. And sound. Getting sound going in Linux took mighty feats of systemic administsationish strength. Mere mortals could not do it. And that’s why we had installfests: so mighty Linux he-men and she-women could come down from the top of Slackware Mountain or the Red Hat Volcano and share their godlike wisdom with us. We gladly packed up our computers and took them to the installfest location (often at a college, since many Linux-skilled people were collegians) and walked away with Linuxized computers. Praise be! Read more

What New Is Going To Be In Ubuntu 17.04 'Zesty Zapus'

Right on the heels of Ubuntu 16.10 'Yakkety Yak' is Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus. Ubuntu 17.04 is currently scheduled for release on April 13, 2017 but know that this is only an estimate. One thing to know is that all things being equal, it is going to be released in April 2017. Ubuntu Zesty Zapus will be supported for only 9 months until January 2018 as it is not a LTS (long term support) release. Read
more

Security News

  • News in brief: DirtyCOW patched for Android; naked lack of security; South Korea hacked
  • Millions exposed to malvertising that hid attack code in banner pixels
    Researchers from antivirus provider Eset said "Stegano," as they've dubbed the campaign, dates back to 2014. Beginning in early October, its unusually stealthy operators scored a major coup by getting the ads displayed on a variety of unnamed reputable news sites, each with millions of daily visitors. Borrowing from the word steganography—the practice of concealing secret messages inside a larger document that dates back to at least 440 BC—Stegano hides parts of its malicious code in parameters controlling the transparency of pixels used to display banner ads. While the attack code alters the tone or color of the images, the changes are almost invisible to the untrained eye.
  • Backdoor accounts found in 80 Sony IP security camera models
    Many network security cameras made by Sony could be taken over by hackers and infected with botnet malware if their firmware is not updated to the latest version. Researchers from SEC Consult have found two backdoor accounts that exist in 80 models of professional Sony security cameras, mainly used by companies and government agencies given their high price. One set of hard-coded credentials is in the Web interface and allows a remote attacker to send requests that would enable the Telnet service on the camera, the SEC Consult researchers said in an advisory Tuesday.
  • I'm giving up on PGP
    After years of wrestling GnuPG with varying levels of enthusiasm, I came to the conclusion that it's just not worth it, and I'm giving up. At least on the concept of long term PGP keys. This is not about the gpg tool itself, or about tools at all. Many already wrote about that. It's about the long term PGP key model—be it secured by Web of Trust, fingerprints or Trust on First Use—and how it failed me.

OpenSUSE Ends Support For Binary AMD Graphics Driver

Bruno Friedmann has announced the end to AMD proprietary driver fglrx support in openSUSE while also announcing they don't plan to support the hybrid proprietary AMDGPU-PRO stack either. Friedmann wrote, "Say goodbye fglrx!, repeat after me, goodbye fglrx... [In regards to the newer AMDGPU-PRO stack] I will certainly not help proprietary crap, if I don’t have a solid base to work with, and a bit of help from their side. I wish good luck to those who want to try those drivers, I’ve got a look inside, and got a blame face." Read more