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SUSE

openSUSE Developers Discuss the Removal of Custom Artwork for KDE Plasma 5

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SUSE

openSUSE developer Luca Beltrame started a new discussion on the openSUSE mailing list where he explains some facts regarding the future of custom themes for the KDE Plasma desktop environment used in the openSUSE Linux distribution.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets Wine 1.8 RC2, VirtualBox 5.0.10, and GDM 3.18.2

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SUSE

Dominique Leuenberger informs users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling-release operating system about the release of two news snapshots, which include several updated applications and a few other under-the-hood improvements.

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Tumbleweed changes fonts, Leap gets several updates

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SUSE

Tumbleweed had one snapshot so far this week that brought more appeal to users of openSUSE.

Snapshot 20151123 changed fonts for openSUSE. The terminal font changed to Adobe Code Pro and Roboto was also added as the default font.

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What happened with Suse Linux Enterprise Server?

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OS
Linux
SUSE

It had been years since I installed Suse Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) for development and testing purposes. I recently loaded SLES 12 to port RapidDisk as a precompiled RPM for the distribution and what a disaster that was. What happened to this distribution? Read more here.

openSUSE Leap 42.1 + Cinnamon, XFCE, or Budgie = GeckoLinux

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Linux
News
SUSE

GeckoLinux is based on openSUSE Leap 42.1, and it exists to make the openSUSE distribution more refined and approachable. It has recently released live installable DVD editions featuring the Cinnamon, XFCE, and Budgie desktop environments. These include many refinements and features not available in the standard openSUSE Leap installation images.

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openSUSE Leap bring SUSE Linux Enterprise out in the open

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SUSE

SUSE has been doing things very, very right for a very long time. It never ceases to amaze me that this brilliant company hasn't found more traction in the US. Hopefully openSUSE LEAP will be that which will help them leap in the spotlight here in the States.

Do you SUSE? Will you LEAP?

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Leaping in a new direction with openSUSE 42.1

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Reviews
SUSE

Of the three distributions, I think Fedora is closest to the cutting edge, with openSUSE and Ubuntu both fairly close behind. However, Fedora and Ubuntu have relatively short support cycles with Fedora releases usually supported for about 14 months, Ubuntu 15.10 for just nine months and openSUSE 42.1 will receive three years of support.

The best distribution for the job will depend on the person and, of course, the role the distribution is to play. I think Fedora is aimed mostly at more technical users and people who like to tinker. Ubuntu is aimed squarely at Linux newcomers who generally want to just use their computer and openSUSE appears to be aiming at a sort of middle ground: people who have a little Linux experience and want options, but also want reliability and longer support cycles.

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GeckoLinux - based on openSUSE Leap 42.1 with more features and refinements

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Linux
News
SUSE

GeckoLinux is a Linux spin based on the openSUSE distribution, with a focus on polish and out-of-the-box usability on the desktop. Unlike its parent distribution, GeckoLinux is available as a live DVD that can be tested before installing. It has a number of unique features compared to its parent distribution. Read more...

openSUSE 13.1 Reaches End of Life on January 5, 2016, Update to openSUSE Leap 42.1

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SUSE

Marcus Meissner of openSUSE informs users that the openSUSE 13.1 GNU/Linux operating system will reach the end of its life in approximately two months from the moment of writing this article, on January 5, 2016.

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SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
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Development News

OSS Leftovers

  • The most in demand skills you need for an open source job
    With coding and software development in serious need of talent, it’s essentially a graduate’s market, but you still need the right combination of skills and attributes to beat the competition. When it comes to open source and DevOps, a deeper understanding is essential.
  • Why the Open Source Cloud Is Important
    To this end, foundations such as the Cloud Foundry Foundation, Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) and Open Container Initiative (OCI) at The Linux Foundation are actively bringing in new open source projects and engaging member companies to create industry standards for new cloud-native technologies. The goal is to help improve interoperability and create a stable base for container operations on which companies can safely build commercial dependencies.
  • AI Platforms Welcome Devs With Open Arms
    Two leaders in the field of artificial intelligence have announced that they're open-sourcing their AI platforms. After investing in building rich simulated environments to serve as laboratories for AI research, Google's DeepMind Lab on Saturday said it would open the platform for the broader research community's use. DeepMind has been using its AI lab for some time, and it has "only barely scratched the surface of what is possible" in it, noted team members Charlie Beattie, Joel Leibo, Stig Petersen and Shane Legg in an online post.
  • The Linux Foundation Seeks Technical and Business Speakers for Open Networking Summit 2017
  • Pencils down: Why open source is the future of standardized testing
    Administering standardized tests online is trickier than it sounds. Underneath the facade of simple multiple choice forms, any workable platform needs a complex web of features to ensure that databases don’t buckle under the pressure of tens of thousands of test takers at once. On top of that, it also needs to ensure that responses are scored correctly and that it’s impossible for students to cheat.
  • LLVM 4.0 Planned For Release At End Of February, Will Move To New Versioning Scheme
    Hans Wennborg has laid out plans to release the LLVM 4.0 (and Clang 4.0, along with other LLVM sub-projects) toward the end of February. The proposal by continuing LLVM release manager Hans Wennborg puts the 4.0 branching followed by RC1 at 12 January, RC2 at 1 February, and the official release around 21 February.

Red Hat and Fedora

Games for GNU/Linux