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SUSE

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • Google Summer of Code Student Implementing Payment Feature

    Embedded below is the blog of Google Summer of Code student Rishabh Saxena. Rishabh is assisting with openSUSE’s Open Source Event Management during the Google Summer of Code.

  • Debugger in YaST

    Until now debugging the YaST installation was usually done by checking the y2log. If you needed more details you would add more log calls.

    This is inconvenient and takes too much time. For better debugging a real debugger would be nice…

  • May “installs” — Tumbleweed and 42.2 Alpha1

    It’s early June, and I still have not reported a couple of “installs” that I did in May. So better late than never.

    I used scare quotes around “install” because I did not actually install Tumbleweed in May, though I did do some install tests. There’s not a lot to report, so this will be a short post.

OpenSUSE Tumbleweed 's Latest

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Getting Linux Kernel 4.6 Soon, GCC 6 Migration in Progress

    Today, June 1, 2016, openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio informed the openSUSE community about the latest GNU/Linux technologies that are coming to the rolling openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system, as well as what has landed last week.

    First of all, users are being informed that the first Alpha release of the upcoming openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system is now available for download and testing. However, the development cycle for openSUSE Leap 42.2 has just started, and it looks like the final release lands in the first week of November 2016.

  • openSUSE News: New Kernel, KDE Applications to arrive in Tumbleweed

    openSUSE Leap 42.2 Alpha 1, which is now available for testing, made some news last week, but this week’s news focuses more on openSUSE’s rolling distribution.

    Developers have been focusing on moving Tumbleweed to GNU Compiler Collection 6, which is always challenging for a distribution.

    In the openSUSE Tumbleweed’s Review of the Weeks 2016/21 email sent out last week by Dominique Leuenberger, he listed the progression of moving GCC 6 to the default compiler, which can be viewed on the wiki.

GeckoLinux version 421.160527.0 based on openSUSE Leap with significant updates

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SUSE

GeckoLinux is a Linux spin based on the openSUSE Leap distribution, with a focus on polish and out-of-the-box usability on the desktop. Its recent 421.160527.0 update is offered in eight (8) editions: Cinnamon, XFCE, Gnome, Plasma, Mate, Budgie, LXQt, and "BareBones", with significant improvements.

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OpenSUSE 42.2 Alpha

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SUSE

openSUSE Leap 42.2 Enters Development, First Alpha Build Brings New Goodies

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SUSE

openSUSE developer Ludwig Nussel has proudly announced today, May 24, 2016, that a first Alpha build of the upcoming openSUSE Leap 42.2 computer operating system is now ready for public testing.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Needs Your Help to Make GCC 6 the Default Compiler

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SUSE

We reported at the beginning of the month that the openSUSE Tumbleweed developers are preparing a massive package rebuild to make the GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) 6 the default compiler for the rolling operating system.

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SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • Developers Conference 2016, day 3 with openSUSE bug hunting

    I had my «openSUSE bug hunting» presentation scheduled at 09h30 this morning. I’m usually very lazy on Sundays but the enthusiasm of the Developers Conference is just an amazing feeling. Though we live on a small island, we get to meet some people maybe just once a year during this fun event. I picked up Shelly on the way and we reached Voilà Hotel at 09h05. Right at the hotel entrance Yash was waiting, he might have seen us coming. We went upstairs chatting and met JoKi. My presentation was scheduled at the Accelerator and I thought I’d just go and test the gear. Aargh! The TV had only HDMI cable and my ThinkPad had VGA & a Mini DisplayPort. That said, I needed an adapter. Joffrey who came around greeting everyone had a HDMI to VGA cable, which he lent me. At that same time JoKi also came with a Mini DisplayPort to HDMI convertor. Great! Then I had an adapter plus a backup.

  • YodaQA’s abilities are enlarged by traffic domain

    Everybody driving a car needs the navigation to get to the destination fast and avoid traffic jam. One of the biggest problems is how to enter fast the destination and how to find where are the congestions, what is the traffic situation. YodaQA Traffic is a project attempting to answer the traffic related questions quickly and efficiently. Drivers may ask questions in natural language like: “What is the traffic situation in the Evropská street?” or “What is the fastest route from Opletalova street to Kafkova street?” You can try out the prototype (demo available only for limited time) – try to ask for example “traffic situation in the Wilsonova street” .

  • openSUSE helps jump-start new summit

    Last week, members of The GNOME Project announced a new conference in the United States northwest to enhance the GNU/Linux application ecosystem.

    The Libre Application Summit, which will take place in Portland, Oregon, from Sept. 19 – 23, aims to empower application developers both big and small as well as enhance app developers collaboratation with major Linux distributions.

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed Getting Qt 5.6, Linux Kernel 4.6, and KDE Plasma 5.6.4 Soon

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SUSE

Today, May 18, openSUSE developer Douglas DeMaio has informed the community about the new features that are about to land in the software repositories of openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling GNU/Linux operating system.

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SUSE Linux Enterprise Live Patching Promises 100% Uptime for Businesses

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SUSE

Today, May 17, 2016, SUSE, a pioneer in open source software and the maker of the SUSE Linux operating system, has had the great pleasure of announcing the availability of SUSE Linux Enterprise Live Patching.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE and GNOME

  • A Simple, Straightforward Clipboard Manager for GNOME
    Clipboard Manager extension for Gnome Shell is a no-frills clipboard manager for GNOME. It adds an indicator menu to the top panel and caches your clipboard history. There’s nothing extra; no regex searching, or cross-device, multi-sync or pan-dimensional magic. Just a simple, easy to access clipboard history. I’ve never been a particularly big clipboard fan. I typically only need to access whatever I copy as I copy it.
  • First GNOME 3.26 Development Release Out, Some Apps Ported to Meson Build System
    GNOME Project's Michael Catanzaro just informed us via an email announcement that the first unstable release of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment is out now for public testing and early adopters. Yes, we're talking about GNOME 3.25.1, the first development in the release cycle of GNOME 3.26, which is currently scheduled to launch later this year, on September 13. Being the first unstable release and all that, GNOME 3.25.1 doesn't ship with many changes, and you can check out the CORE NEWS and APPS NEWS for details.
  • Features To Look Forward To In Next Month's KDE Plasma 5.10
    We are just one month away from seeing the next KDE Plasma 5 desktop release.
  • User Question: With Some Free Software Phone Projects Ending, What Does Plasma Mobile's Future Look Like?
    Rosy. While it is true that Plasma Mobile used to be built on the Ubuntu Phone codebase, that was superseded some time ago. The recent events at Ubuntu and other mobile communities have not modified the pace of the development (which is pretty fast) or the end goal, which is to build frameworks that will allow convergence for all kinds of front-ends and apps on all kinds of devices.

Google in Devices

  • Glow LEDs with Google Home
    For the part one, the custom commands were possible thanks to Google Actions Apis. I used API.AI for my purpose since they had good documentation. I wont go into detail explaining the form fields in Api.ai, they have done a good job with documentation and explaining part, I will just share my configurations screenshot for your quick reference and understanding. In Api.ai the conversations are broken into intents. I used one intent (Default Welcome Intent) and a followup intent (Default Welcome Intent – custom) for my application.
  • Google Assistant SDK preview brings voice agent to the Raspberry Pi
    Google has released a Python-based Google Assistant SDK that’s designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3. Google’s developer preview aims to bring Google Assistant voice agent applications to Linux developers. The Google Assistant SDK is initially designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3 using Python and Raspbian Linux, but it works with most Linux distributions. The SDK lets developers add voice control, natural language understanding, and Google AI services to a variety of devices.
  • Huawei, Google create a high-powered single board computer for Android
    The Raspberry Pi is very popular with DIY enthusiasts because of the seemingly endless possibilities of how you can design devices with it. Huawei and Google have created their own single board computer (SBC), but this will probably benefit Android developers more than DIY enthusiasts. The HiKey 960 is a very robust SBC aimed at creating an Android PC or a testing tool for Android apps.
  • Huawei’s $239 HiKey 960 wants to be a high-end alternative to Raspberry Pi
    12.5 million sales in five years – Linaro and Huawei have unveiled a high-end (read: expensive) rival.

Mobile, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • Is The Open Source Software Movement A Technological Religion?
  • Experts weigh in on open source platforms, market
    In this Advisory Board, our experts discuss the pros and cons of open source virtualization and which platforms are giving proprietary vendors a run for their money.
  • Light a fire under Cassandra with Apache Ignite
    Apache Cassandra is a popular database for several reasons. The open source, distributed, NoSQL database has no single point of failure, so it’s well suited for high-availability applications. It supports multi-datacenter replication, allowing organizations to achieve greater resiliency by, for example, storing data across multiple Amazon Web Services availability zones. It also offers massive and linear scalability, so any number of nodes can easily be added to any Cassandra cluster in any datacenter. For these reasons, companies such as Netflix, eBay, Expedia, and several others have been using Cassandra for key parts of their businesses for many years.
  • Proprietary Election Systems: Summarily Disqualified
    Hello Open Source Software Community & U.S. Voters, I and the California Association of Voting Officials, represent a group of renowned computer scientists that have pioneered open source election systems, including, "one4all," New Hampshire’s Open Source Accessible Voting System (see attached). Today government organizations like NASA, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Air Force rely on open source software for mission critical operations. I and CAVO believe voting and elections are indeed mission-critical to protect democracy and fulfill the promise of the United States of America as a representative republic. Since 2004, the open source community has advocated for transparent and secure—publicly owned—election systems to replace the insecure, proprietary systems most often deployed within communities. Open source options for elections systems can reduce the costs to taxpayers by as much as 50% compared to traditional proprietary options, which also eliminates vendor lock-in, or the inability of an elections office to migrate away from a solution as costs rise or quality decreases.
  • Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – YES, Linux! [Ed: Marketing and PR from IDG's "Microsoft Subnet"; This headline is a lie from Microsoft; something running on DrawBridge (proprietary Wine-like Windows layer) is not GNU/Linux]