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SUSE

Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 11.0: Package Management, with Duncan Mac-Vicar

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SUSE

opensuse.org: In this article we will be covering all of the changes in and around the package management stack in the upcoming openSUSE 11.0. There have been a plethora of both visual and behind-the-scenes changes. We’ll also be talking to Duncan Mac-Vicar, YaST team lead, ZYpp and KDE developer, to find out a little more later.

Why does the retail box matter? (openSUSE 11.0 ready for pre-order)

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zonker.opensuse: Retail box? What’s up with that, right? We’re all about the free downloads over here, right? Yes, but… there’s a method to the madness of offering a retail box as well.

Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 11.0: New Installer, with Stephan Kulow

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opensuse.org: I’m glad to announce the beginning of the Sneak Peaks at openSUSE 11.0 series! Over the next few weeks we will be taking a look at all of the exciting changes and improvements in openSUSE 11.0, with each article being followed by an interview with a developer in the field.

A Microsoft coupon bonanza for Novell? Not really

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Matt Asay: Ed Moltzen writes headlines an article with "Microsoft's Coupon Money Boosts Novell's Linux Numbers," which is true on its face, but not as interesting under the covers. Justin Steinman, Novell's head of Linux marketing, had told me a week ago

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 25

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opensuse.org: Issue #25 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: People of openSUSE: Matthias Fehring, Interview: KDevelop and the openSUSE Build Service, and blogs.zdnet.com: “OpenSUSE 11 RC1: The Mercedes-Benz to Ubuntu’s Volkswagen.”

One more thing with Novell: the EULA

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SUSE

beranger.org: OK, it's about a Beta/Prerelease. Still, it's open source and governed by GPL or by more permissive licenses. And what is openSUSE 11.0b3 EULA saying? (Was it written by Microsoft, or what?)

openSUSE 11: Ubuntu Killer?

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SUSE

junauza.com: I have been an avid openSUSE user in the past as it worked perfectly on my main workstation. However, I switched to Xubuntu as I'm more obsessed with speed and simplicity nowadays more than anything else.

OpenSUSE 11 RC1: The Mercedes-Benz to Ubuntu’s Volkswagen

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SUSE

blogs.zdnet.com: 2008 will be a very good vintage for community end-user Linux distributions. I must admit, however, to having a particularly strong interest in OpenSUSE, Novell’s entry into the community Linux distro fray.

Novell finalises OpenSuse 11

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SUSE

zdnet.co.uk: OpenSuse 11.0 Release Candidate 1 (RC1) appeared on Thursday, the same day Novell revealed strong growth in its Linux business, strengthening its position against Linux market leader Red Hat.

People of openSUSE: Matthias Fehring

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Interviews
SUSE

opensuse.org: ‘People of openSUSE’ caught up the man behind the great effort done on the German openSUSE wiki - Matthias Fehring. He is one of the system operatores of the de.opensuse.org wiki and long time openSUSE user.

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Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • Calamares 2.3 Installer Released
  • ANNOUNCE: libosinfo 0.3.1 released
    I am happy to announce a new release of libosinfo, version 0.3.1 is now available, signed with key DAF3 A6FD B26B 6291 2D0E 8E3F BE86 EBB4 1510 4FDF (4096R). All historical releases are available from the project download page.
  • There and Back Again: The MongoDB Cloud Story
    Before it was a database company, MongoDB was a cloud company. Founded in 2007 and originally known as 10gen, the company originally intended to build a Java cloud platform. After building a database it called MongoDB, the company realized that the infrastructure software it had built to support its product was more popular than the product itself, and the PaaS company pivoted to become a database company – eventually taking the obvious step of renaming itself to reflect its new purpose.
  • C++17: New Features Coming To 33-Year-Old Programming Language
    The C++17 standard is taking shape and adding new features to the vintage programming language. This major update aims to make C++ an easier language to work with and brings powerful technical specifications.
  • Clearing the Keystone Environment

GNU/Linux Leftovers

Red Hat Summit

  • Red Hat Summit Advocates the Power of Participation
    Red Hat hosted its annual Red Hat Summit customer event June 28-30 at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, with a theme of harnessing the power of participation. Once again, the DevNation developer event, which is the successor to JBoss World, was co-located with Red Hat Summit. For JBoss, 2016 is a particularly significant year as it marks 10 years since Red Hat acquired it. At DevNation, Red Hat announced the new JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) 7 release, providing new cloud-enhanced capabilities for Red Hat's flagship middleware platform. JBoss is now also working to help enable Java for the container era, with the launch of the MicroProfile Project, an effort to optimize enterprise Java for a microservices architecture. Java wasn't the only focus of DevNation this year either, as Microsoft took center stage too, announcing the availability of its .NET Core for Red Hat Enterprise Linux. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at some of the highlights of the Red Hat Summit and DevNation 2016 events.
  • How Red Hat is tailoring OpenStack to fit … everyone
    Even though there have been no major changes announced to the OpenStack platform of late, it was still one of the most talked about subjects at this year’s Red Hat Summit. Red Hat plays a significant role in the development of the platform and is very proud of its contribution to the community.
  • New technologies foster an open-source environment
    In 2007, when 3scale, Inc. was founded, some people thought it was crazy to be investing so much time and energy into API. But Steven Willmott, CEO of 3scale, Inc., said that even at that time his team knew that the future was API-driven, and they wanted to help that happen.