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SUSE

SUSE Policy on Btrfs and Kubic

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SUSE
  • SUSE pledges endless love for btrfs, says Red Hat's dumping irrelevant

    SUSE has decided to let the world it has no plans to step away from the btrfs filesystem and plans to make it even better.

    The company's public display of affection comes after Red Hat decided not to fully support the filesystem in its own Linux.

    Losing a place in one of the big three Linux distros isn't a good look for any package even if, as was the case with this decision, Red Hat was never a big contributor or fan of btrfs.

  • SUSE Remains Committed To The Btrfs File-System

    While Red Hat is backing away from Btrfs support in favor of their next-gen Stratis project and mature Linux file-systems like EXT4 and XFS, SUSE is reaffirming their support for Btrfs.

    SUSE was the first to significantly back Btrfs by making it the default file-system in SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12. While other major distributions haven't been following in that same direction and Red Hat recently deprecating their Btrfs support, SUSE has made it clear they will continue investing in Btrfs.

  • In riposte to Red Hat, SUSE affirms support for Btrfs

    Germany-based SUSE Linux has reacted to Red Hat's recent announcement that it would be deprecating the Btrfs filesystem by affirming that it would continue to be the default option for its enterprise Linux distribution.

  • Introducing Kubic: a community-driven container-as-a-service platform

    MicroOS is SUSE's modern and slightly different take on cluster computing for containers and microservices. This is what you ought to know about it.

Butter bei die Fische!

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SUSE

If Brazil, one of the world biggest producers of beef, would announce to stop producing fish: would you wonder, whether Peru, one of the world biggest producers of fish, would stop producing fish?

You probably wouldn’t.

If one of the rather small contributors to the btrfs filesystem announced to not support btrfs for production systems: should you wonder, whether SUSE, strongest contributor to btrfs today, would stop investing into btrfs?

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SUSE Now Offers Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications on the Google Cloud

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Linux
SUSE

SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications is now available as the operating system for SAP solutions on the Google Cloud Platform (GCP), allowing enterprise customers to become more agile and reduce operating costs by only paying for what they use

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openSUSE Leap 42.3

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Reviews
SUSE

openSUSE Leap is a conservative distribution that opts for stable packages over the latest and greatest. The latest release of Leap, version 42.3, ships with version 4.4 of the Linux kernel, but with many features backported from newer releases of the kernel. GNOME 3.20 and KDE Plasma 5.8 are the main desktops offered, but Xfce and LXDE can also be installed from the install media, with other options available post-install or via net-install. Firefox 52 ESR is the default browser in both GNOME and KDE and LibreOffice 5.3 serves as the default office suite.

As someone who appreciates a slower, more cautious update cadence, I was intrigued by openSUSE Leap 42.3's package selection. A slightly older desktop environment paired with an ESR Firefox and a recent release of LibreOffice is something I could find myself using as my main distribution, so I downloaded the 4.6GB ISO to give openSUSE Leap 42.3 a trail run. Below, I take a look at openSUSE's installation process, the KDE Plasma desktop, and more before sharing my final thoughts.

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openSUSE Leap 42.3

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SUSE
  • I just spent about 5 hours trying to install Linux mint, Then finally gave up and installed OpenSuse in about half an hour.
  • openSUSE Leap 42.3 Linux OS Release Features

    The Linux best project openSUSE Project releases its latest & most powerful Linux based operating system openSUSE Leap 42.3 brings the community version aligned with its core of SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12.

    The Linux users, administrators & developers use the newest chameleon distribution with the support of mutual packages of both Leap & SLE distributions. The leap 42.3 new release has SUSE adopters including server OS so as to deploy IT in physical, virtual & cloud environments.

    openSUSE Leap 42.3 is the Leap’s 3rd edition which has more than 10,000 packages and offers better stability for the Linux users with a new refresh hardware enables release.The release is powered by Linux 4.4 Long-Term-Support (LTS) kernel. Leap 42.3 supports KDE’s Long-Term-Support LTS release 5.8 as the default desktop selection. It also offers GNOME 3.20 as well as SUSE Linux Enterprise support.

A look at OpenSUSE based Gecko Linux

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Reviews
SUSE

I was sitting at home writing future articles for Ghacks and I decided on a spur of the moment whim that I wanted to try out a distribution I had never touched before.

I’ve tried countless systems over the years, from the typical Ubuntu and Debian based systems, to Arch based systems like Manjaro, even Gentoo based systems like Sabayon.

However, I was thinking about it and OpenSUSE used to be one of my favourite distributions to use but I’ve never actually sat down and tried a respin of an OpenSUSE based system; so I started digging around into what some popular ones were...And Gecko Linux caught my eye.

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Things To Do After Installing openSUSE, YaST Development Sprint 39

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Hands-on: A walk through the openSUSE Leap 42.3 installer

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SUSE

I wrote about the latest openSUSE Leap release a few days ago. In that post, I included some details about upgrading an existing openSUSE Leap installation to the new release. Since then, I have performed a fresh installation on another of my systems (the Acer Aspire V), so in this post I am going to include screenshots and a brief description of the installation process.

First, let's repeat some of the basic information about this release. The release announcement on the openSUSE website gives a bit of information (and a lot of propaganda) about the new release.The release notes contain a lot more technical detail, so be sure to read them before starting.

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SUSE aims to tackle skills shortage in open source in ME

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OSS
SUSE

SUSE is teaming up with the training arm of technology distributor Ingram Micro to offer a set of 18 instructed-led SUSE training modules in the Middle East.

A Linux Foundation study last year found out that 87% of hiring managers say open skills are hard to come by.

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OpenSUSE 42.3

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SUSE
  • openSUSE 42.3 Released, Here’s What’s New

    After 8 months of continues development. The openSUSE team has just announced openSUSE 42.3. Which is considered to be the latest release of the stable openSUSE branch (called Leap).

  • openSUSE Leap 42.3 Linux-based operating system is here -- download it now

    Variety is both a gift and curse for Linux on the desktop. On the one hand, it is nice that there are so many operating systems based on the kernel from which to choose. On the other, it can sometimes feel like the community is very fragmented. Not only is there tribalism between users of distributions, but desktop environments too. For instance, there is Ubuntu vs. Fedora and KDE vs. GNOME -- much like Coke vs. Pepsi and Chevy vs. Ford. This is just human nature, I suppose.

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Packet radio lives on through open source software

Packet radio is an amateur radio technology from the early 1980s that sends data between computers. Linux has natively supported the packet radio protocol, more formally known as AX.25, since 1993. Despite its age, amateur radio operators continue to use and develop packet radio today. A Linux packet station can be used for mail, chat, and TCP/IP. It also has some unique capabilities, such as tracking the positions of nearby stations or sending short messages via the International Space Station (ISS). Read more

Linux 4.14-rc2

I'm back to my usual Sunday release schedule, and rc2 is out there in all the normal places. This was a fairly usual rc2, with a very quiet beginning of the week, and then most changes came in on Friday afternoon and Saturday (with the last few ones showing up Sunday morning). Normally I tend to dislike how that pushes most of my work into the weekend, but this time I took advantage of it, spending the quiet part of last week diving instead. Anyway, the only unusual thing worth noting here is that the security subsystem pull request that came in during the merge window got rejected due to problems, and so rc2 ends up with most of that security pull having been merged in independent pieces instead. Read more Also: Linux 4.14-rc2 Kernel Released

Manjaro Linux Phasing out i686 (32bit) Support

In a not very surprising move by the Manjaro Linux developers, a blog post was made by Philip, the Lead Developer of the popular distribution based off Arch Linux, On Sept. 23 that reveals that 32-bit support will be phased out. In his announcement, Philip says, “Due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community, we have decided to phase out the support of this architecture. The decision means that v17.0.3 ISO will be the last that allows to install 32 bit Manjaro Linux. September and October will be our deprecation period, during which i686 will be still receiving upgraded packages. Starting from November 2017, packaging will no longer require that from maintainers, effectively making i686 unsupported.” Read more