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SUSE

Will SUSE Bring SBCs to Datacenters?

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SUSE

Is the Raspberry Pi destined to be coming to your datacenter? If not the Pi, then something like it -- maybe Arduino or a single board computer we haven't seen yet, perhaps developed by one of the OEMs? Unless I miss my guess, a Pi-like device is soon going to make up the guts in a new breed of server.

Back in November, SUSE announced that it has ported SLES, its flagship Linux operating system, to run on the Raspberry Pi 3, and has released it under the somewhat predictable name SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Raspberry Pi. According to the announcement, as well as an accompanying blog post by jayk, this is no big deal. It was done mainly just for the fun of it, with its only practical application being "that it would be really a cool way for our field team to demonstrate SLES at trade shows."

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GeckoLinux "Rolling" and "Static" editions updated

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Linux
News
SUSE

The Rolling spins of GeckoLinux have been updated to a newer openSUSE Tumbleweed base system, together with some configuration improvements. Additionally, the GeckoLinux Static spins have also been updated with similar improvements.

GeckoLinux offers live installable Rolling spins based on openSUSE Tumbleweed, and live installable Static spins based on openSUSE Leap 42.2. GeckoLinux currently offers customized spins for the Cinnamon, XFCE, Gnome, Plasma, Mate, and LXQt desktop environments.

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GeckoLinux Rolling Editions Now Based on the Latest openSUSE Tumbleweed Snapshot

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Linux
SUSE

After announcing last week the release of the GeckoLinux Static 422.161213 Editions based on openSUSE Leap 42.2, the developers of the openSUSE-based distribution launched today new respins of the GeckoLinux Rolling Editions.

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SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 for Raspberry Pi: An intriguing option for data centers

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SUSE

SUSE announced recently that it managed to take its enterprise-grade platform, SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES), and marry it with the Raspberry Pi. Fancy that—a platform created to support massive workloads and mission-critical services running on a $35 computer.

You can download a 60-day evaluation of SUSE Enterprise Server 12 SP2 for Pi (login required). Be sure to check out the quick start guide. If you have trouble with subscription codes for SUSE Enterprise Server 12 SP2 for Pi, check out this forum thread.

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GeckoLinux "Rolling" editions updated to newer openSUSE Tumbleweed base, new Calamares installer

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Linux
News
SUSE

The "Rolling" spins of GeckoLinux, based on openSUSE Tumbleweed, have been updated to a newer Tumbleweed base system. Additionally, the old yast2-live-installer has been replaced in favor of the Calamares installer.

GeckoLinux offers live installable "Rolling" spins based on openSUSE Tumbleweed, and live installable "Static" spins based on openSUSE Leap 42.2. It currently offers customized spins for the Cinnamon, XFCE, Gnome, Plasma, Mate, and LXQt desktop environments.

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GeckoLinux Static Editions Get Calamares Installer, Based on openSUSE Leap 42.2

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SUSE

The developers of the openSUSE-based GeckoLinux computer operating system have announced the release of a new set of respined live ISO images of their GNU/Linux distribution, which is now rebased on openSUSE Leap 42.2.

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OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 - Forrest Gimp

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SUSE

I do have to admit I've been waiting for openSUSE to release 42.2. Even though the much anticipated Leap version did not stun me, I still have a secret love for openSUSE, deep deep down, as it was my first proper distro, and it has always shown that level of professionalism you don't get elsewhere. Lately, it's been flaking, but still.

Anyhow, let's try to rekindle the emotion. OpenSUSE 42.2, also named Leap, is here, and currently, it comes as a mighty DVD-size ISO. Live editions ought to follow soon, but for me, it was time to bleed the network bandwidth. Testbed? The notorious if recently somewhat redeemed Lenovo G50 machine.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Updates

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/50

    Even though the year is not yet completely over, this will be the last review for this year: starting from today on, I will be on annual leave until January 9th 2017, when I will resume all activities. Tumbleweed of course will not stop rolling at this time: it is YOU that makes it rolling after all. Nevertheless, you should not be surprised if the pace goes a bit down as many people will be busy with other things during this period.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets GStreamer 1.10.2 and FFmpeg 3.2.2, Prepares for GTK+ 4

    On December 15, 2016, openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio had the great pleasure to report on the latest goodies brought by a total of seven snapshots to users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed distribution.

    Since our last report, it looks like another busy week hit the development team behind openSUSE Tumbleweed, a Linux-based operating system that follows a rolling release model, which means that users are always getting the latest software versions without the need to download a new ISO image and reinstall/upgrade their systems.

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • New Tumbleweed snapshot 20161213 released!
  • GNOME, Notmuch update in Tumbleweed

    To state that not much has been happening in openSUSE Tumbleweed is an understatement as there were seven snapshot this week.

    Life, however, is full of surprises and irony and this article just might end with a little.

    The beginning of the week started with snapshot 20161208 that had a change that affects Python users. The update of python3-setuptools to version 30.2.0 dropped support for Python 3.2, which was released in February of 2011. The snapshot also provided an update to Kernel firmware 20161130 with patches affecting Intel Bluetooth.

  • openSUSE:Leap:42.3 started

openSUSE Leap 42.3 Open for Development, Based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 SP3

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SUSE

Today, December 13, 2016, openSUSE Linux developer Ludwig Nussel was proud to announce that the next major release of the openSUSE Leap operating system has entered development.

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Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Delayed Until February 2, Will Bring Linux 4.8, Newer Mesa

If you've been waiting to upgrade your Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system to the 16.04.2 point release, which should have hit the streets a couple of days ago, you'll have to wait until February 2. We hate to give you guys bad news, but Canonical's engineers are still working hard these days to port all the goodies from the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) repositories to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which is a long-term supported version, until 2019. These include the Linux 4.8 kernel packages and an updated graphics stack based on a newer X.Org Server version and Mesa 3D Graphics Library. Read more

Calamares Release and Adoption

  • Calamares 3.0 Universal Linux Installer Released, Drops Support for KPMcore 2
    Calamares, the open-source distribution-independent system installer, which is used by many GNU/Linux distributions, including the popular KaOS, Netrunner, Chakra GNU/Linux, and recently KDE Neon, was updated today to version 3.0. Calamares 3.0 is a major milestone, ending the support for the 2.4 series, which recently received its last maintenance update, versioned 2.4.6, bringing numerous improvements, countless bug fixes, and some long-anticipated features, including a brand-new PythonQt-based module interface.
  • Due to Popular Request, KDE Neon Is Adopting the Calamares Graphical Installer
    KDE Neon maintainer Jonathan Riddell is announcing today the immediate availability of the popular Calamares distribution-independent Linux installer framework on the Developer Unstable Edition of KDE Neon. It would appear that many KDE Neon users have voted for Calamares to become the default graphical installer system used for installing the Linux-based operating system on their personal computers. Indeed, Calamares is a popular installer framework that's being successfully used by many distros, including Chakra, Netrunner, and KaOS.

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