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SUSE

SUSE and openSUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • SUSE serves up Linux kernel patching, live & hot

    If there’s one thing that Linux needs to aid its march onwards it is (arguably) more enterprise robustness.

    Actually, if there’s one thing that Linux needs for enterprise success it’s firms like Microsoft stating that it loves Linux, but we’ve already experienced that epiphany, so what else can we hope for?

  • Tumbleweed Snapshots Get YaST Changes for Firewalld

    There is no signs of slowing down openSUSE’s rolling release  Tumbleweed as six snapshots of new software were released this past week.

    Not all the snapshots were large; in fact, one offered just a handful of new packages, but the releases keep coming.

SUSE releases live patching for big iron, real-time OS update

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Security
SUSE

Germany-based Linux vendor SUSE Linux has launched live patching for its enterprise Linux distribution that runs on IBM Power Systems and also a service pack for its real-tine enterprise distribution that will enable systems running it to handle both real-time and non-real-time workloads on a single virtual machine.

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openSUSE's New Beta and Ruby on openSUSE

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Leap 15 Operating System Enters Beta, Based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 15
  • OpenSUSE Leap 15 Beta Snapshots Begin, Powered By Linux 4.14 + Plasma 5.12

    The first public beta snapshots have begun for openSUSE Leap 15, the distribution that will be mirroring SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 15 that is under development for release this summer.

  • Ruby on openSUSE

    Ruby is a wonderful programming language. Every year in December as a kind of Christmas present there is a new release. It's great to be on a language which is kept up to date but it comes with the challenge to manage multiple Ruby versions. There are a couple of solutions around such as RVM, rbenv, or chruby but they all have their drawbacks.

    What would a Linux distribution do? At openSUSE, we package all the versions in the Build Service. We also package many gems but this is an effort which is sort of futile given the huge and growing number of gems and their versions. But you do reliably get the Ruby interpreter and gem tool as openSUSE package. To not create conflicts all the executables are suffixed with the Ruby version. That allows for parallel installation of multiple Ruby versions. It also works for all the executables installed through gems. The drawback is that you don't get the executable names you would expect because of the additional suffix.

openSUSE Leap 15 Reaches Beta Phase Snapshots

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SUSE

Exactly like the rolling development model used to make openSUSE Leap 42.3, Leap 15.0 will use the same model until its final build. No concrete milestones will be used building up to the final release, which is expected in late Spring. As bugs are fixed and new packages introduced or excluded, snapshots of the latest beta phase builds will be released once they pass openQA testing; the first beta version build (Build 109.3) of openSUSE Leap 15 was recently released and there are currently two follow-on beta builds that would feature minor improvements if the beta builds pass openQA .

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Also: KDE Plasma 5.12, Btrfs Improvement, Linux Support for Wacom SmartPad Devices and More

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Can Now Try Out the KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS Desktop

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KDE
SUSE

Eight new snapshots have been released for OpenSuSE Tumbleweed since our last report, bringing users the beta version for the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS desktop environment, which is coming in early February, along with the first point release of the KDE Applications 17.12 software suite and KDE Frameworks 5.42.0.

"The largest snapshot of the week was no doubt snapshot 20180122. The snapshot provided KDE Applications 17.12.1, Frameworks 5.42.0 and the beta version for KDE’s next Long-Term-Support (LTS) release of Plasma 5.12. Tumbleweed users can try out the new items in the 5.12 LTS like the new KDE Store, which brings a wide selection of addons," Douglas DeMaio wrote in a weekly report.

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openSUSE Education Project Is Going Bye-Bye After Release of openSUSE Leap 15.0

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SUSE

A public announcement was made last week by OpenSuSE Project's Lars Vogdt to inform the community about the future of the openSUSE Education project, which tried to support schools in the past several years using the latest openSUSE Leap and SUSE Linux Enterprise technologies.

The latest release of the openSUSE-Edu Li-f-e (Linux for Education) operating system was based on openSUSE Leap 42.1, and the team appears to still spend a lot of time maintaining more than 460 packages in the openSUSE Education project, but did not manage to find new contributors to maintain its repositories or create a new release.

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openSUSE and openSUSE-Education

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SUSE
  • OpenSUSE Rolling Out Retpoline Support, Xen Spectre/Meltdown Mitigation

    SUSE's Richard Brown has issued a status update around openSUSE's ongoing mitigation of the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities.

    The big piece of news is openSUSE is rolling out Spectre V2 mitigation soon using Retpoliens rather than their current microcode approach where they ended up pulling that anyhow in light of the Intel CPU microcode troubles recently reported of reboots, etc.

  • The future of openSUSE-Education

    The openSUSE-Education project tries to support schools using openSUSE. We create and describe additional software-repositories for educational projects and we created Add-on medias and finally a live DVD from the regular openSUSE distribution.

    As you can see in our timeline, we achieved quite a lot in the past years, had fun and meet a couple of very nice people out there in our spare time. But the main team members moved on to new projects, with the hope that we would one day find some time to work more on openSUSE-Education again. This does not seem to happen – at least not for the foreseeable future.

openSUSE Leap 42.2 Linux Operating System Reached End of Life, Upgrade Now

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SUSE

The openSUSE Leap 42.2 Linux-based operating system has reached end of life on January 26, 2018, and it is no longer supported by the openSUSE Project with software and security updates.

A minor release of openSUSE Leap 42 operating system series, openSUSE Leap 42.2 was released on November 16, 2016, and was based on the SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2 operating system. The release was powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel and KDE Plasma 5.8 desktop environment, besides numerous other new GNU/Linux and Open Source technologies.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Server
SUSE
  • Mirantis CEO Adrian Ionel Comes Back, Champions Open Source for Multi-Cloud

    Mirantis brought back its original CEO and Co-founder Adrian Ionel (pictured), to move the company beyond private cloud and help its customers adopt multi-cloud strategies. Alex Freeland, who is also a co-founder, will step down as CEO but remain a board member.

    Ionel served as CEO from the company’s launch in 2011 until 2015, when he left to start up Dorsal, an open source software support firm. During his initial tenure at Mirantis he led the company’s investment in OpenStack, growing its customer base to more than 200 enterprises.

  • Highlights of YaST Development Sprint 49

    Time goes by and the YaST wheel keeps rolling. So let’s take a look to what have moved since our previous development report.

  • Storage-NG Now Active In openSUSE Tumbleweed

    SUSE's libstorage-ng back-end for YaST's new low-level storage library is now active within the rolling-release openSUSE Tumbleweed distribution.

    Libstorage has traditionally been responsible for SUSE/openSUSE's disk/partition/LVM management and other storage device management. After more than two years of work, libstorage-ng has replaced libstorage within Tumbleweed.

openSUSE Leap 42.2 Linux Distribution Reaches End of Life on January 26, 2018

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SUSE

Announced two years ago on November 16, OpenSuSE Leap 42.2 is a minor release of openSUSE Leap 42 operating system series, which brought the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel and KDE Plasma 5.8 desktop environment, as well as many other improvements and up-to-date components. openSUSE Leap 42.2 was based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2, but it will reach end of life this week on January 26.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Virtual Reality in Mixed Reality, Taskcluster Development

  • Building Bold New Worlds With Virtual Reality
    From rich text to video to podcasts, the Internet era offers an array of new ways for creators to build worlds. Here at Mozilla, we are particularly excited about virtual reality. Imagine moving beyond watching or listening to a story; imagine also feeling that story. Imagine being inside it with your entire mind and body. Now imagine sharing and entering that experience with something as simple as a web URL. That’s the potential before us.
  • This Week in Mixed Reality: Issue 3
    This week we’re heads down focusing on adding features in the three broad areas of Browsers, Social and the Content Ecosystem.
  • New to me: the Taskcluster team
    At this time last year, I had just moved on from Release Engineering to start managing the Sheriffs and the Developer Workflow teams. Shortly after the release of Firefox Quantum, I also inherited the Taskcluster team. The next few months were *ridiculously* busy as I tried to juggle the management responsibilities of three largely disparate groups.
  • Taskcluster migration update: we're finished!
    Over the past few weeks we've hit a few major milestones in our project to migrate all of Firefox's CI and release automation to taskcluster. Firefox 60 and higher are now 100% on taskcluster!

OSS Leftovers

  • After the First US Transaction, Propy Announces an Open Source Developer Program
    California-based blockchain startup Propy, is bringing the commercial use of blockchain technology to the US. After facilitating the first US Blockchain-based real estate deed in Vermont, Propy announced a new open source Developer Program. The idea behind Propy: it allows anyone to buy or sell real estate, anywhere, online. Propy provides an efficient crypto and fiat payment and an immutable record on the blockchain, ensuring that title deeds and property rights will be there forever.
  • Titus, the Netflix container management platform, is now open source
    Titus powers critical aspects of the Netflix business, from video streaming, recommendations and machine learning, big data, content encoding, studio technology, internal engineering tools, and other Netflix workloads. Titus offers a convenient model for managing compute resources, allows developers to maintain just their application artifacts, and provides a consistent developer experience from a developer’s laptop to production by leveraging Netflix container-focused engineering tools.
  • Netflix's Container Management System Is Now Open Source
    On Thursday Netflix announced it's made its home grown container management system, Titus, open source.
  • Lumina Networks on delivering open source SDN
    What kinds of companies should consider open source SDN, and what are the associated challenges in using such open source deployments? Lumina Networks has unrivalled expertise in working with customers and partners to deliver implementations, and explains its processes and outlines the benefits of using open source SDN.
  • Luxoft launches PELUX 1.0 open source platform for automotive
    Luxoft’s automotive division has launched PELUX 1.0, an open source platform available to developers. This has been developed from its PELUX software suite as used by carmakers and tier 1 suppliers to build converged infotainment, autonomous driving, communication, HMI and car body control systems.
  • Dev Preview: MongoDB Enterprise Running on OpenShift
    In order to compete and get products to market rapidly, enterprises today leverage cloud-ready and cloud-enabled technologies. Platforms as a Service (or PaaS) provide out-of-the-box capabilities which enable application developers to focus on their business logic and users instead of infrastructure and interoperability. This key ability separates successful projects from those which drown themselves in tangential work which never stops. In this blog post, we’ll cover MongoDB’s general PaaS and cloud enablement strategy as well as touch upon some new features of Red Hat’s OpenShift which enable you to run production-ready MongoDB clusters. We’re also excited to announce the developer preview of MongoDB Enterprise Server running on OpenShift. This preview allows you to test out how your applications will interact with MongoDB running on OpenShift.
  • Is Open Source The AI Nirvana for Intel? [Ed: openwashing a malicious company using buzzwords and urban myths]
  • Writing Chuck – Joke As A Service
    Recently I really got interested to learn Go, and to be honest I found it to be a beautiful language. I personally feel that it has that performance boost factor from a static language background and easy prototype and get things done philosophy from dynamic language background. The real inspiration to learn Go was these amazing number of tools written and the ease with which these tools perform although they seem to be quite heavy. One of the good examples is Docker. So I thought I would write some utility for fun, I have been using fortune, this is a Linux utility which gives random quotes from a database. I thought let me write something similar but let me do something with jokes, keeping this mind I was actually searching for what can I do and I landed up on jokes about Chuck Norris or as we say it facts about him. I landed up on chucknorris.io they have an API which can return different jokes about Chuck, and there it was my opportunity to put something up and I chose Go for it.

today's howtos

Security: Updates, IBM, Elytron and Container Vulnerability Scanning

  • Security updates for Friday
  • IBM Security launches open-source AI
    IBM Security unveiled an open-source toolkit at RSA 2018 that will allow the cyber community to test their AI-based security defenses against a strong and complex opponent in order to help build resilience and dependability into their systems.
  • Elytron: A New Security Framework in WildFly/JBoss EAP
    Elytron is a new security framework that ships with WildFly version 10 and Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) 7.1. This project is a complete replacement of PicketBox and JAAS. Elytron is a single security framework that will be usable for securing management access to the server and for securing applications deployed in WildFly. You can still use the legacy security framework, which is PicketBox, but it is a deprecated module; hence, there is no guarantee that PicketBox will be included in future releases of WildFly. In this article, we will explore the components of Elytron and how to configure them in Wildfly.
  • PodCTL #32 – Container Vulnerability Scanning