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SUSE

Openwashing and SUSE

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SUSE

Mesa, Nano, Redis, Git Update in openSUSE Tumbleweed

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Another four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released this week.

A notable package updated this week is a new major version of (gucharmap)[https://wiki.gnome.org/Apps/Gucharmap]. Plus several python package updates, nano, mesa, git and Xfce packages also had new minor updates.

The most recent snapshot, 202000331 is trending well with a stable rating of 99 on the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer. The GNOME Character Map, gucharmap, updated to version 13.0.0, but no changelog was provided. An update for glib2 2.62.6 is expected to be the final release of the stable 2.62.x series; maintenance efforts will be shifted to the newer 2.64.x series. The updated glib2 package fixed SOCKS5 username/password authentication. The 2.34 binutils package added and removed a few patches. GTK3 3.24.16 fixed problems with clipboard handling and fixed a crash in the Wayland input method. The package for creating business diagrams, kdiagram 2.6.2 fixed printing issue. The Linux Kernel updated to 5.5.13. A handful of Advanced Linux Sound Architecture changes were made in the kernel update. The 5.6.x kernel is expected to be released in a Tumbleweed snapshot soon. The libstorage-ng 4.2.71 package simplified combining disks with different block sizes into RAID. The programming language vala 0.46.7 made verious improvements and bug fixes and properly set CodeNode.error when reporting an error. Several xfce4 packages were updated and xfce4-pulseaudio-plugin 0.4.3 fixed various memory leaks and warnings and xterm 353 was updated. The yast2-firewall 4.2.4 packaged was updated and forces a reset of the firewalld API instance after modifying the service state and yast2-storage-ng 4.2.104 extended and improved the Application Programming Interface to get udev names for a block device

The package to improve audio and video under Linux pipewire 0.3.1 switched the license to MIT and added fdupes BuildRequires and pass fdupes macro while removing duplicate files, which came in snapshot 20200326. The 1.1.9 spec-cleaner package drop travis and tox and now uses github actions. Several python arrived in this snapshot. Python-packaging 20.3 fixed a bug that caused a 32-bit OS that runs on a 64-bit ARM CPU (e.g. ARM-v8, aarch64), to report the wrong bitness and python-SQLAlchemy 1.3.15 fixed regression in 1.3.14. The Xfce file manager package, thunar 1.8.14 updated translations and reverted a bug that introduced a regression. The snapshot recorded a stable rating of 99.

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Also: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/14

Reasons to Give openSUSE a Try

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For some reason, all the light goes these days toward distributions like Ubuntu, Mint, Manjaro, Solus… And the other similar ones. But despite being an excellent Linux distribution in itself, openSUSE rarely receives attention in the Linux press and its userbase doesn’t sound to be comparable to other famous Linux distributions.

This perhaps could be because people don’t know about the features of openSUSE? Or they fear trying it because of some reason. In any case, we’ll introduce you to the distribution and its features, and why you should give it a try.

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SUSE/OpenSUSE: Open Build Service, Greenwashing and SUSE Manager

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  • Containers building with the Open Build Service

    If you are interested in containers building, maintenance and publishing then this video tutorial might be for you.

    It depicts the journey of a developer using the Open Build Service [1] to create and publish a container based solution using KIWI [2].

    I hope you can enjoy the video and I look forward to any feedback you may have.

  • 3 Ways Open Source is Helping to Tackle Climate Change

    Amid the current global pandemic and all of the research activity associated with it, our lives have changed dramatically. World economies have been greatly impacted, but I remain confident that things will recover in a few months. Open source software and supercomputers around the world have been helping in that research, as discussed in a recent blog post.

  • Start of SUSE Manager 4.1 Public Beta Program!

    We have a new Public Mailing List, so you can share your feedback with our Public Beta Community, our Engineering and our Product Managers.

SUSE/OpenSUSE: Tensorflow, KubeCF, Tumbleweed, zypper

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  • Artificial Intelligence: do it with SUSE!

    With Tensorflow 2.1 finally landing in Package Hub [1], SUSE offers a wide variety of tools and frameworks on their both free and commercial products.

    In the past week, we updated the v1 API of Tensorflow to its latest stable release being 1.15.2. This is much more than a nice to have: the latest revision addresses some outstanding CVEs and it is absolutely great to have that available in our stable repositories.

  • With KubeCF, Cloud Foundry comes to Kubernetes

    Some people think you need to decide between Cloud Foundry, a prominent open-source Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) cloud, and Kubernetes, the wildly popular container orchestration program. That's never been true. They perform different jobs, and you've long been able to use them together. Now, though, the Cloud Foundry Foundation with SUSE, the Linux and cloud company, are putting KubeCF forward as an incubating project.

    [...]

    In this release, the code's been refactored to work on Kubernetes directly. It's also been open sourced under the same Apache 2 license as is Cloud Foundry itself. This work has been ongoing by SAP, IBM, and SUSE in the "Containerizing Cloud Foundry" initiative. Earlier results were the creation of Eirini for scheduling user apps on Kubernetes, and Quarks to deploy and manage BOSH, a virtual machine (VM) manager on Kubernetes.

    The one thing missing, said Chip Childers, CTO of Cloud Foundry Foundation, was a distribution of CFAR (the Cloud Foundry application runtime) for Kubernetes. "With KubeCF, we were able to fill the gap by building a repository that brings all of the components of CFAR together into a distribution. We are thrilled to have them join as an incubation project and to continue a productive relationship in the future."

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/11 & 12

    Dear Tumbleweed users and hackers,

    Last week I missed, for personal reasons, to write up the report. So, slacking in one week means I have to catch up the other week. Of course, you are all eager to hear/read what is happening in Tumbleweed. In the period since covered, we have released 7 Snapshots (0305, 0306, 0307, 0309, 0311, 0312 and 0314).

  • Ansible zypper update all packages on OpenSUSE/SUSE

    I got a cluster of servers powered by OpenSUSE / SUSE Enterprise Linux. How can I update all of them using the zypper module of Ansible? How can I use Ansible for system updates and reboot the server when kernel upgrades took place on SUSE/OpenSUSE?

SUSE/OpenSUSE: COVID-19, openSUSE.Asia Summit and SUSE Hackweek

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  • SUSE’s Business Continuity in Light of COVID-19

    The trust of our customers and partners is the lifeblood of SUSE. This is what has driven our innovation and success over the last 28 years. In the current environment, it is a priority for us to not only maintain, but also grow, this trust and to extend our support.

    Over the course of the last month, I’ve heard from many customers and partners who have found their businesses unexpectedly disrupted by the COVID-19 situation. I’d like to take this opportunity to share a personal assurance with all our customers and partners: SUSE remains fully committed to you and your business.

    During this time and as always, we are determined to ensuring your mission-critical business is running wherever you may be located. We have established a Business Continuity Committee to ensure you continue to receive outstanding open source innovation, support and services from us.

  • openSUSE.Asia Summit 2020 Announcement

    India was accepted to host the openSUSE.Asia Summit 2020. openSUSE.Asia summit is going to be held for the first time in India, Faridabad.Faridabad is a district of Haryana situated in the National Capital Region bordering the Indian capital New Delhi.

    The supporters of openSUSE in India, and of Free/Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) at large are excited to organize the most awaited openSUSE.Asia Summit event. In this activity, experts, contributors, end users, and technology enthusiasts will gather to share experiences about the development of openSUSE and other things related to FLOSS and have a lot of fun. The venue for the openSUSE.Asia Summit was chosen after being proposed by the Indian community during openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 in Bali, Indonesia. Finally, the Asian committee decided Faridabad as the host of openSUSE.Asia Summit 2020 from September 25 to September 27, 2020, at Manav Rachna International Institute of Research & Studies, Faridabad.

  • Artificial Intelligence Piano – My Hackweek Project

    With this article, I would like to introduce you to my SUSE Hackweek 19 project. If you worked on similar projects or topics, or if you would like to exchange experiences, please feel free to reach out to me.

OpenSUSE and SUSE: YaST, Tumbleweed and SUSECON

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  • Highlights of YaST Development Sprint 94

    After some time of silent work (our previous blog post was published a month ago), the YaST Team is back with some news about the latest development sprint and some Hack Week experiments.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/10

    Tumbleweed – full steam ahead! There have been 6 snapshots in the last week, some with quite some changes. The snapshots were 0227, 0228, 0229, 0301, 0303 and 0304.

  • Reimagining SUSECON 2020

    The health and wellbeing of our customers, partners, colleagues, and communities are of the utmost importance to SUSE. In light of the growing concern around COVID-19, and as a precautionary measure, we have decided to transform SUSECON 2020 into SUSECON Digital 2020, a virtual event.

Plasma, VIM, Wireshark update in Tumbleweed

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A total of five openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released this week that provided updates for YaST, KDE’s Long Term Support version of Plasma and the open source printing system CUPS.

The latest snapshot, 20200301, updated a few libraries like libstorage-ng, which updated to version 4.2.65; the low-level storage library’s newer version added support for btrfs RAID1C, added being and end functions to ProbeCallbacks, and updated translations. The update of libyui to 3.9.3 removed obsolete RPM group tags. A check to make sure the network is working before starting the initialization scripts was made with the autoyast2 4.2.28 update. Support was added for IBM’s S390 secure boot with the yast2-firstboot package update. The update of yast2 4.2.67 made a change to show capable modules in the control center for Windows Subsystem for Linux and a jump from yast2-network 4.2.47 to 4.2.58 added a class to represent NTP servers. The snapshot is currently trending at a stable rating of 98, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

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SUSE/OpenSUSE: Machine Learning, OBS, and Building SUSE Linux Enterprise

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  • Machine Learning with openSUSE

    In the past few weeks, many engineers have been working hard to create a foundation in Tumbleweed, the openSUSE rolling-release version, for a variety of Machine Learning frameworks and tools.
    They span from Tensorflow 1.13.2 to ONNX 1.6, Caffe, Theano and RStudio (both desktop and server editions). Many of these tools, libraries and frameworks existed in the development project for quite some time but it was time to promote them to the level they deserved to ensure they were made first-class citizen in the openSUSE Factory.
    Some of these frameworks have also been made available in other forms than just RPMs, for an even greater and easier consumption.

  • Who Said OBS Was Not Responsive?

    If you believe so, we’re hopefully going to change your opinion next time you surf OBS within our beta program. In the last two weeks, we kept working in improving responsiveness following a mobile-first approach. Lots of issues were fixed and a bunch of changes were made.

  • How SUSE builds its Enterprise Linux distribution – PART 4

    This is the fourth blog of a series in which we will provide some insight into SUSE Linux Enterprise product development. You will get a first-hand overview of SUSE, the SLE products, what the engineering team do to tackle the challenges coming from the increasing pace of open source projects, and the new requirements from our customers....

SUSE/OpenSUSE: Linux Professional Institute (LPI), SLE 15 SP2, SUSE CaaS Platform and Sarah Julia Kriesch Steps Down

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  • SUSE Academic Program teams up with Linux Professional Institute to promote Open Source and Linux education

    As of December 12, 2019, SUSE and Linux Professional Institute (LPI) signed a MoU to increase the use of Open Source Software and provide quality learning and certification tools to the academic sector worldwide. When we first came together months ago, the goal was clear and simple, let’s utilize both of our communities to promote open source education. To highlight a few main points, the scope of the collaboration includes:

  • SLE 15 SP2 Public Beta – Snapshot Updates (5,6,7)

    As you might know from our SLE 15 SP2 Public Beta announcement, we are now releasing fewer Public Beta ISOs but we are releasing weekly updates, called Snapshot, in our Beta Online Channels!

  • Monitoring, Alerting, and Visualization for SUSE CaaS Platform

    In order to manage systems and deliver applications optimally, securely, and continuously, it’s important to know what’s going on. Are resources failing or overtaxed? Are applications serving their users well?

    And while piles of statistics in reams of reports can provide the data you need, the key information in the data can be obscured by sheer volume. It’s more valuable when it’s easy to see, and when you can be alerted when limits are reached or neared or when something fails.

    The gold standard for monitoring, alerting, and visualization in the cloud-native world, and for modern open source technologies in general, is the pairing of Prometheus (for monitoring and alerting) and Grafana (for visualization). That is why we’re pleased to announce that, as of the beginning of this year, they have been available in our registry as supported components of SUSE CaaS Platform.

  • openSUSE community welcomes new board member

    The results of the openSUSE Board election were published on 1 February 2020. The community welcomed Sarah Julia Kriesch and Simon Lees as they started their new term.

    However, ten days later, Sarah stepped down, leaving a vacant seat on the board. Under such circumstance and the board election rules, the sitting board may appoint someone until the next board election.

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