Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

SUSE

Top 6 Reasons Why You Should Use OpenSUSE

Filed under
SUSE

Some of the most popular Linux distributions lay in three categories: Ubuntu/Debian-based distros, Fedora, and Arch Linux. Today, I will give you an insight into one distribution you might not have used before and why you should try it out – The openSUSE Linux distribution.

I have used so many Linux distributions either for development, as a server, or just for fun and experience. Of all these distributions, I always find OpenSUSE being a unique distro. From the default Desktop background, applications all the way to executing commands with the zypper package manager – openSUSE feels so shiny and sacred. In this post, we will look at the Top 6 Reasons Why You Should Use OpenSUSE.

Read more

Also: The Unified Path Ahead For Building SUSE Linux Enterprise + openSUSE Leap

GNOME, VLC, Zypper update in Tumbleweed

Filed under
SUSE

Five openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released this week.

The snapshots updated the GNOME desktop, GStreamer, VLC and a couple text editors.

An update of bash 5.1.4 arrived in the latest snapshot 20210120. A few patches were added to the bash version, which is the latest release candidate. The 2.83 version of dnsmasq took care of five Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures; one of the fixes handles multiple identical near simultaneous DNS queries better and another CVE replaced the slightly lesser SHA-1 hash with the SHA-256 hash function, which verifies the DNS answers received are for the questions originally asked. GStreamer 1.18.3 fixed a memory leak and added support for the Apple M1, which made news yesterday as being able to run Linux. Several other GStreamer plugins were updated. Video player VLC updated for version 3.0.12 and added new Reliable Internet Stream Transport access output module compliant with a simple profile. About a dozen more packages were updated in the snapshot including ncurses , openldap2 2.4.57, and perl-Mojolicious 8.71.

Read more

SUSE/OpenSUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE

  • OAK compatibility with all openSUSE

    While fcused on the openSUSE Innovator initiative as an openSUSE member and official Intel oneAPI innovator, I tested the OAK AI Kit device on openSUSE Leap 15.1, 15.2 and Tumbleweed. With all the work, we made available in the SDB an article on how to install this device on the openSUSE platform. More information can be found at https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:Install_OAK_AI_Kit.

    The OpenCV AI Kit, that is, OAK, is a tiny, low-end hardware computing module based on the integrated Intel Movidius Myriad-X AI chip. In comparison to other GPU, CPU, FPGA or TPU-based AI acceleration solutions, Movidius is a VPU architecture with 4.0 TOPS computing capacity. And it is 80 times faster for CV and AI tasks than the well-known OpenMV project, which has only 0.05 TOPS based on the ARM Cortex M7 microcontroller.

  • SUSE’s acquisition of Rancher ushers in an innovative new brand

    In 2020 SUSE and Rancher joined forces with one shared vision: being known as the leading open source innovator in the world. Entrusted with the challenge of fusing two strong brands, the brand refresh needed to capture the heart and soul of both companies while aligning them to one strong, shared identity.

  • Content Management with SUSE Manager 4.1

    The concept of Content Lifecycle Management is not new and applies to any piece of digital content, following it from beginning, to middle, to end of creation. With SUSE® Manager, this idea is applied to software intended for rollout to production systems. Content Lifecycle Management allows you to customize and test packages before updating production systems. This is especially useful if you need to apply updates during a limited maintenance window.

    From within SUSE® Manager, you can select software channels as sources, adjust them as required for your environment, and thoroughly test them before installing onto your production systems. From beginning (original development), to middle (testing), to end (deployment).

Xfce 4.16 Desktop Lands in openSUSE Tumbleweed, Download Now

Filed under
SUSE

If you’ve been waiting for Xfce 4.16 to land in openSUSE Tumbleweed, I have some good news today as the wait is over and you can install the desktop environment right now from distribution’s software repositories and upgrade from Xfce 4.14.

Xfce 4.16 brings many goodies for fans of the lightweight desktop environment, including fractional scaling, dark mode for the Panel, CSD (Client-side decorations) support for all the Settings dialogs, a revamped About Xfce dialog with info about CPU, GPU and RAM, as well as a refreshed look with new icons and color palette.

Read more

openSUSE Tumbleweed ARM Adds Support for Raspberry Pi 400 and Raspberry Pi 4 CM

Filed under
SUSE

While this new openSUSE Tumbleweed ARM snapshot may look like an ordinary one, the biggest change is the fat that it now supports Raspberry Pi Foundation’s recently unveiled Raspberry Pi 400 personal computer kit, which is in fact a 4GB Raspberry Pi 4 board disguised as a keyboard.

In addition, openSUSE Tumbleweed ARM now also supports the latest Raspberry Pi 4 Compute Module (CM), which is a Raspberry Pi 4 board in a compact form factor designed specifically for deeply embedded applications.

Read more

OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Updates

Filed under
SUSE
  • Tumbleweed Rolls Into The New Year - openSUSE News

    The holidays might be over and the new year is here, but users of openSUSE Tumbleweed didn’t see any difference in the amount of snapshots released over the holiday season.

    Tumbleweed snapshots have been rolling out daily before toasting to new beginnings last week.

    Providing a fresh point of view for the new year, snapshot 20210106 brought an update to the 3D graphics package Mesa with version 20.3.2. The update brings in several new features upgrading from the 20.2.4 version with new Radeon Vulkan drivers and web rendering with EGL_KHR_swap_buffers_with_damage on X11. Two Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures exploits were fixed in an update of nodejs14 with version 14.15.4; CVE-2020-8265, which could corrupt memory leading to a Denial of Service exploit, and CVE-2020-8287, which had an HTTP Request Smuggling weakness, were both fixed. Xen had a patch update and removed some code. Other packages to update in the snapshot were busybox 1.32.1, libstorage-ng 4.3.78 and a few others.

    Snapshot 20210105 updated a single package with the update of terminus-bitmap-fonts 4.49.1. The newer version added Open Type Bitmap support and altered ascii to be more useful with a back quote.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2021/01 – Dominique a.k.a. DimStar (Dim*)

    Dear Tumbleweed users and hackers,

    A new year is already upon us, the first week of it is already. We humans might have to get used to writing ‘2021’ instead of ‘2020’, for Tumbleweed, this seems not to matter at all. The week has kicked off strong with 6 snapshots (0101, 0102, 0103, 0104, 0105, and 0106). The number of incoming submissions is also increasing again, showing that contributors are returning from their well-deserved holiday.

openSUSE Community Publishes End of Year Survey Results

Filed under
SUSE

The openSUSE community has published the End of the Year Community Survey results.

The results provided some significant information about the project’s tools, its distributions, the demographics of the users as well as how the community is contributing to the project.

The highest percentage of users were between the ages of 35 and 49, according to the results. More than half the respondents were from Europe; the Americas made up roughly a quarter of the respondents and Asia 10 percent. Both Oceania and Africa respondents had similar percentages below 2 percent.

Read more

OpenSUSE and KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
SUSE
  • OpenSUSE Leap 15.2 essential post-install tweaks

    There you go. Hopefully, this guide will make your openSUSE experience more pleasant, more accessible. As I've outlined in my review, the updates part is the big issue, and if you can or are willing to get past it, then this tweaking article has value. Otherwise, none of this really makes sense.

    Well, provided you did reach this bit, then we talked about additional repositories, package conflicts, multimedia, fonts, some theming and polish, extra applications, Plasma integration, and a few other elements. If you have any asks as to what else might be required in this distro, don't be a stranger, and I'll see what I can do. That said, I won't be using Leap 15.2, because it just isn't stable and robust enough for me. Sad face. All right, that would be all for now.

  • Providing KDE software updates from git for fun and profit in openSUSE | dennogumi.org

    Yes, today I’m going to talk about the OBS, that is the Open Build Service, not to be confused with another highly successful open source project.

    As you know, since ages, the openSUSE KDE team provides a series of repositories which track the latest state of the git repositories in KDE, be them either Frameworks, Plasma, or the applications part of the Release Service. This also allows to create Live CDs which can be useful for testing out the software.

    But the question that I’ve seen every now and then is… how it is actually done? Is everything provided by the OBS, or does someone need to add some glue on top of that?

  • Refreshed look | dennogumi.org

    More recently, I’ve been reading about Hugo, a rather fast static site generator which also happens to be packaged for openSUSE. In particular I found the approach to theming better than Jekyll, because you can just override parts of a theme should you require it, instead of forking a whole theme and hope for the best.

    Thus, I used the Ananke theme with some extra additions (documented in the git repository). Importing things was pretty painless. The CSS wasn’t, and I’m sure there are still loads of broken things, but at least I’m moving forward. Please leave a comment if you find anything broken, thanks!

    Hopefully I can blog a little more than just making an update and disappearing again (not that I’ve disappeared: I’ve been fairly active doing packaging work in openSUSE). But again, to quote the words of Merlin, “it is a secret only known to the ancient gods and me.”

  • November/December in KDE PIM

    Following Kévin it’s my turn to show you what happened around Kontact in the previous two months. More than 30 people contributed about 1200 changes in that time, we had a new major release in early December and there’s a virtual New Year meetup on Saturday!

openSUSE Tumbleweed on the Banana Pi BPI-M2 ZERO

Filed under
SUSE

I recently got myself a Banana Pi M2 Zero board while ordering other stuff at an electronics distributor. The M2 zero is the same form factor and feature set as the Raspberry Pi Zero W (the GPIO pin headers are said to be compatible, it has WiFi and Bluetooth built in and an USB OTG port). The CPU is an Allwinner H2+, a quad-core ARM processor running a 1GHz clock speed, RAM size is 512MB. Processing power is probably comparable to a Raspberry Pi 2 board.

I bought the M2 Zero to use it with an RTLSDR stick to receive the signal of my outside RF temperature sensor. This worked with the Raspberry Pi Zero W, but was a bit too much for the slower CPU which has other more important things to do anyway (playing internet radio Wink, so the M2 Zero was a cheap, more powerful alternative. The box will be running headless and thus I do not care about support for graphics and multimedia anyway.

In the end, I switched the RF receiver to a RaspyRFM board whih is using less energy and simpler to use than an RTLSDR stick just to receive some sensors and now the M2 Zero board is free for tinkering...

Read more

Also: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/53

openSUSE community elects Axel, Gertjan and Neal to serve on the Board

Filed under
SUSE

The complete election results are:

Axel Braun — 142 votes
Gertjan Lettink — 134 votes
Neal Gompa — 131 votes
Maurizio Galli — 103 votes
Nathan Wolf — 59 votes

Five votes were recorded for the "none of the above" option. Out of 518 eligible voters, 229 voters have cast their vote in this election, which represents a turnout of 44%. It's a low turnout compared to last year's board election which was 56%.

Read more

Syndicate content