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SUSE

SUSE Manager 4.2 and SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP3

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SUSE

  • Introducing SUSE Manager 4.2

    SUSE Manager 4.2, the latest release from SUSE, further delivers a best-in-class open source infrastructure and systems management solution that enhances automation, simplifies management, and extends client support.

    Catering for all of your software infrastructure management needs SUSE Manager 4.2 is a open source infrastructure and systems management solution for your Hybrid Cloud IT – from edge to datacenter to cloud.

  • SUSE Manager for Retail 4.2 what’s new? | SUSE Communities

    Manage, Secure, Automate and Comply with the newest version of the SUSE Infrastructure Management Solution for the Retail industry

    From Mainframe and HPC Clusters to bare metal servers and VMs down to point of service terminals, kiosks, self-service and reverse-vending system Linux deployments, SUSE Manager for Retail is designed to help you reduce costs, optimize operations, and ensure compliance across your retail IT infrastructure while reducing complexity and regaining control.

  • Introducing SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP3

    When it comes to running all your workloads, one size Linux OS does not fit all. That’s why we offer the industry-leading adaptable Linux operating system. No matter what your workload requirements (performance, reliability, operating environment), we have an OS solution purpose-built for your needs.

SUSE/OpenSUSE: IBM LinuxONE, openSUSE 15.3 Overview and More

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openSUSE Leap 15.3 – A stable base with modern applications

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SUSE

Its interesting to watch Youtube reviews for openSUSE Leap 15.3. One of the main critics is that it doesn’t offer the latest KDE and GNOME desktop versions. “The software is quite old.” Yes, that is not very interesting for a reviewer. Because as a reviewer, you like to point out what is new. And what is exiting. And the goal of openSUSE Leap 15.3 is to not be exciting. The goal is to be stable.

openSUSE Leap and SUSE Linux Enterprise have moved closer together over the last few years. I remember all the effort that has been put into making sure that the codebase for the base packages of openSUSE Leap and SUSE Linux Enterprise were similar. In may 2015 (yes, that is a while ago) Richard Brown announced that the latest SUSE Enterprise Sources where now available in the Open Build Service and he presented the vision for a new stable release version, which would be named openSUSE Leap. But after that, there was still a lot of work. It took a couple of releases (42.1, 42.2, 42.3 and then 15) before the base packages of Leap and SLE were completely aligned. From openSUSE Leap 15 and onwards, SUSE officially supported organizations who wanted to migrate from Leap 15 to SLE 15. And this new release takes that integration even further. From openSUSE Leap 15.3 and onwards, the binary packages of the base of Leap 15.3 and SLE 15 Service Pack 3 will be identical. The packages on top of that base will be ‘community backports’. And these packages will work on both Leap 15.3 and on SLE 15 Service Pack 3.

So you will get a rock solid distribution, because it needs to be enterprise grade. Enterprises don’t have the time, nor the willingness to mess with software. They want to get work done. The software should just work. And that is exactly what you should expect from openSUSE Leap 15.3. This might be a bit boring for a reviewer or for a Linux enthusiast. Because a typical Linux enthusiast wants to try out the latest and greatest software. They want to play around with the new KDE Plasma 5.22 (released on the 8th June 2021). Or they want to play with the new GNOME 40 desktop (released on the 24th March 2021). They can, if they install the latest openSUSE Tumbleweed.

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Plasma, Mesa, curl Update in Tumbleweed

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Three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released this week with the possibility of another snapshot being released over the weekend if it passes openQA testing.

The latest snapshot, 20210609, brought an update for KDE users; Plasma 5.22.0 was released just days ago and improves stability and usability across the board, according to the release announcement. Developers put in a lot of work on the aesthetics of the release. The big new feature in the release is called Adaptive Transparency, which provides a pleasant translucent panel and panel widgets that become entirely opaque if there are any maximized windows; this is done to avoid any visual distractions when users need to focus. The new version also opens up on a speed dial page in System Settings that gives users direct access to the most commonly used settings, as well as to the ones accessed the most. Mozilla Thunderbird renewed an expired keyring in the 78.11.0 version and fixed two Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures. Wireshark 3.4.6 fixed a display filter crash and macro filters’ handling of escaped characters. A major version update for the basic directory structure was made with the jump of the filesystem package from version 15.5 to 84.87. GNOME 40 also received some updates in the snapshot with an update of gnome-software to version 40.2; some crash fixes were made and an improvement in reporting errors low disk space for Flatpak were made. Other packages to update in the snapshot were git 2.32.0, powertop 2.14, xfce4-settings and nftables 0.9.9.

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GeckoLinux STATIC and NEXT 153.210608 released

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Linux
News
SUSE

GeckoLinux is pleased to announce the 153.210608 update to its full range of STATIC and NEXT editions. These updated editions are now based on the new openSUSE Leap 15.3 release, which in turn is built from SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) packages. The Linux kernel is still at version 5.3.18, but additional backports are included for better compatibility with newer hardware. GeckoLinux in turn continues to refine its package selection and unique configuration to provide a simple, clean system that works out of the box. For this GeckoLinux STATIC release, the Calamares installer is now at version 3.2.36, and has been configured to use the Btrfs filesystem with LZO transparent compression by default for the guided partitioning options, although of course all other modern Linux filesystems are also available with the custom partitioning option. When Btrfs is used, the Snapper system is now pre-configured for automatic timeline and administration snapshots, which can be easily managed via the YaST Filesystem Snapshots module. Additionally, zRAM swap is enabled out of the box, and the EarlyOOM daemon is also enabled to help prevent unrecoverable system freezes in low memory situations. NTP for automatic network time updates is now configured out of the box for all editions. Attention has also been given to using the appropriate input driver (libinput or Synaptics) for each desktop environment, and other minor tweaks and improvements are included in several editions. A variety of GeckoLinux STATIC ISO spins are available with polished desktop environments to suit every need and preference:

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New Rebuilds Look to Advance New Hardware

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Developers of the openSUSE community are making advances toward even broader hardware support through the FrontRunner project.

FrontRunner is a rebuild of SUSE Linux Enterprise from sources in the Open Build Service (OBS) that provides community collaboration through openSUSE’s Step effort. FrontRunner rebuilds all sources in one project that include and stage changes to advance architecture enablement for future Leap releases.

“I am excited how FrontRunner opens up a new approach for openSUSE and SUSE to jointly enable new hardware architectures for openSUSE Leap,” said Dr. Gerald Pfeifer, chair of the openSUSE Board and Chief Technical Officer at SUSE.

openSUSE Leap inherits its base from SUSE Linux Enterprise.

“FrontRunner provides a staging area to feed back into SUSE Linux Enterprise, allowing for new levels of collaboration,” Pfeifer said.

Step, which was started in February, is designed to expand more architecture availability for future openSUSE Leap and SLE releases. FrontRunner rebuilds were established within the Step effort under the openSUSE:Step:Frontrunner namespace in OBS.

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Also: openSUSE FrontRunner Aims To Advance The Distro's Hardware Architecture Support

Smart SUSE Linux Enterprise Server shifts compatibility goalposts | ITWeb

Review: openSUSE 15.3

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Reviews
SUSE

I had mostly positive experiences while running openSUSE 15.3. The distribution does a lot of things well. The installer is both fairly straight forward to use and yet, under the surface, offers a lot of advanced options. This started me off with a good first impression, as did the initial welcome screen.

I deeply appreciate that openSUSE is one of the only Linux distributions to entirely embrace advanced filesystems. Its administrative tools automatically take snapshots of changes and we can rollback to previous snapshots from the boot menu. Apart from FreeBSD, I don't know of any other commonly used open source operating system which makes proper use of advanced filesystems such as Btrfs and ZFS.

Speaking of the administration tools, YaST is quite powerful. We can manipulate most aspects of the underlying operating system through YaST and, while some modules are overly complex (for less experienced users), more advanced users will find a lot of useful tools in the YaST panel.

There are some weak points in openSUSE's armour. The web-based application store, promoted by the welcome window, is really rough and overly complicated. It shows far too many package options for simple searches and depends on the user clicking on the proper link to download for the right edition of openSUSE. It will even show packages and download links for packages which haven't been built for openSUSE 15.3 yet.

The distribution offers a short support cycle. openSUSE Leap claims to be a long-term support (LTS) release, but only gets 18 months of updates. This is roughly the same as Fedora and much less than Ubuntu's community editions (which receive 36 months of support) or Ubuntu, Debian, and FreeBSD - each of which offer 60 months of support. Despite its rapid upgrade pace, the provided packages are mostly over a year old. This means openSUSE gives us the upgrade pace of Fedora along with the software age of more conservative distributions.

Not having multimedia codecs available out of the box is rare these days. This, combined with the complex command line steps outlined in the documentation and the failure of applications like Parole to find missing codecs after offering to install them (even after community repositories have been enabled), means new users have an overly complicated and confusing path ahead of them, compared against the experience offered by other distributions, if they want to watch videos.

One thing which I kept coming back to while using openSUSE is that it feels like a distribution for administrators and developers, not for regular home users. Some really complex tasks, like setting up Btrfs, working with complex firewalls, setting up network shares, comparing snapshots, and so on are quite easy (thanks to YaST). However, some basic actions such as playing video files, downloading desktop applications, or reading manual pages are unusually complex on openSUSE. It is a distribution which makes complex tasks easy and simple tasks harder than most other mainstream distributions.

The user interface is fairly polished and the newly upgraded Xfce desktop works well. The system is responsive and worked well with my test environments. I think this fairly smooth experience will entice people, particularly more experienced users, to run openSUSE. openSUSE is a little on the heavy side in terms of memory usage, but the array of convenient features that accompany it more than makes up for the difference in my opinion.

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SUSE Open House CZ 2021 and openSUSE Tumbleweed

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SUSE
  • Online Open House Goes Over openSUSE, Survey Opens

    The openSUSE Project has a lot going on lately. The project just released Leap 15.3, had 24-hour release party in the openSUSE Bar and opened a survey to get feedback on the release of the new Leap version.

    There are many other things happening and one of those is an online open house. Members of the community will have two sessions discussing openSUSE topics during SUSE Open House CZ 2021

    The event will take place on June 15 from 13:00 UTC to 17:00 UTC. Leap release manager Lubos Kocman will give a talk about how openSUSE Leap 15.3 is made and community member Jason Evans will discuss how to contribute to openSUSE.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2021/22

    Dear Tumbleweed users and hackers,

    This week was definitively amongst the more interesting ones for Tumbleweed. There was a change of the basic filesystem layout called UsrMerge. Unfortunately, despite all planning and testing, some users still ran into issues. In some cases, it could be pointed to an ‘unexpected’ setup (root on zfs, /usr/lib/debug as sep mount point…) and in some cases, the reason for the failure is not yet fully understood. But this might sound scarier than it is: a lot of users have also reported that the process worked flawlessly on their systems. Together with a full rebuild using GCC 11 snapshot 0527 was definitively huge. Besides that, two more snapshots (0601, and 0602) were published.

openSUSE Leap 15.3 Released. Here's What's New

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Linux
News
SUSE

The latest stable version of openSUSE Linux distribution - openSUSE Leap 15.3 is now available. In this post, we round up the release with changes and download details.
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Release Manager Provides Update on Early Features Requisitions for Leap 15.4

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The release manager of openSUSE Leap is finishing up the release of Leap 15.3, but wants to keep contributors and developers informed about an early feature request deadline for the Leap 15.4 release.

Early feature requests are important since Leap is compatible with SUSE Linux Enterprise and the early feature request deadline for Service Pack 4 is June 26.

“This is very important to openSUSE Leap 15.4 contributors as 1/3 of Leap 15.4 binaries will be re-used with SUSE Linux Enterprise and therefore submit requests are accepted there,” wrote release manager Lubos Kocman on a project email list. “Just to clarify, this deadline is the same for everyone, be it a largest partner, community contributor or an employee.”

openSUSE Leap and Package Hub exclusive packages will have similar deadlines as described in the roadmap.

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Also: openSUSE.Asia Summit 2021 Logo Competition Announcement

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