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SUSE

SUSE on Servers

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SUSE
  • The University of Maine: High-Performance Computing, Climate Change Research, and Ocean Modeling created a Whale of an appetite when it comes to data. SUSE Enterprise Storage satisfied that appetite!

    With research projects like climate change research and ocean modeling, the university’s high-performance computing center is generating data like a Whale eating Krill.  And that’s a whole lot considering a Blue Whale will consume some 40 million Krill, or about 8000 pounds daily.  The University of Maine is one of only 11 Land, Sea and Space grant institutions in the country. And establishing a stronger and more flexible HPC and storage infrastructure is integral to their success.  It also supports the people of Maine and its businesses across a wide variety of activities.

    Their challenge was with all the current and new larger research projects it increased the demands on data storage and the amount of data collected and consumed. For example, one project at the University of Maine generates high-resolution ocean models to map climate change and requires half a petabyte of data. Another project, employing deep learning to help detect tumors, requires a single directory with over two million files. With these projects and more, the university’s storage architecture was on the brink of collapse under the strain of these diverse and demanding data workloads. The existing system was difficult to scale up and tight budgets would not support a rip-and-replace of the entire system.

  • The Holy Grail of PaaS on Kubernetes

    Kubernetes will solve all of our problems right? It’s the container platform that will allow our development teams to deploy their microservice applications in all their cloud native glory. We’ll all be able to deploy our web apps without needing to worry about the servers that are running them or interact with the system administrators that look after those servers. Self-service for Developers!

SUSE: openSUSE, Stichting Praktijkleren and Eclipse

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SUSE
  • OpenSUSE may go independent from SUSE, reports LWN.net

    Lately, the relationship between SUSE and openSUSE community has been under discussion. Different options are being considered, among which the possibility of setting up openSUSE into an entirely independent foundation is gaining momentum. This will enable openSUSE to have greater autonomy and control over its own future and operations.

    Though openSUSE board chair Richard Brown and SUSE leadership have publicly reiterated that SUSE remains committed to openSUSE. There has been a lot of concern over the ability of openSUSE to be able to operate in a sustainable way, without being entirely beholden to SUSE.

  • Stichting Praktijkleren partners with the SUSE Academic Program to support local Dutch Academies

    In places like the Netherlands, SUSE relies on academic partners to share all of the free resources of the academic program with local educational communities. A newly established partnership with Stichting Praktijkleren will allow SUSE to reach more Dutch schools and students than ever before. Academy Support Centre (ASC) Praktijkleren is the support centre in the Netherlands that supports academies in promoting up-to-date skills in education. Stichting Praktijkleren has a strong network of academies that join together and bring teachers in contact with providers of relevant up-to-date ICT training courses to prepare students for their professional future in the field of ICT. Already working with a number of schools in the Netherlands, including the Avans Hogeschool and Drenthe College, we hope to see our footprint spread with support from Stichting Praktijkleren.

  • Using Eclipse as an IDE for SUSE Cloud Application Platform

    At the recent SUSECON conference in Nashville, RahulKrishna Gupta from SUSE demonstrated how to integrate the Eclipse IDE with SUSE Cloud Application Platform, showing how to easily develop, test, and deploy applications to the platform directly from Eclipse.
    SUSE has posted all recorded talks from SUSECON on YouTube. Check them out if you want to learn more about what SUSE has to offer. We’re not just Linux anymore! I’ll be posting more SUSE Cloud Application Platform talks here over the coming days. Watch RahulKrishna’s talk below:

OSS: Federation, SUSE, Red Hat/Fedora and OSI Sessions

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Red Hat
OSS
SUSE
  • Federated conference videos

    So, foss-north 2019 happened. 260 visitors. 33 speakers. Four days of madness.

    During my opening of the second day I mentioned some social media statistics. Only 7 of our speakers had mastodon accounts, but 30 had twitter accounts.

  • Chameleon and the dragons

    Arriving to the conference venue on a bike was quite pleasant (thanks to bicycle paths almost everywhere in city and amount of parks). One thing which I forgot is the bike lock, but I met Richard Brown and he offered to lock our bikes together.

    First thing which brought my attention was some QR-code on the registration desk which says something like “This is not the first one, search better,” so I had to walk around and try to find correct one. There were 10 of them in different places of Biergarten, each is asking you some question about openSUSE (logos, abbreviations, versions and so on). Once you find all of them and answer correctly, you can pick up prize on registration desk. I really enjoyed this so I proposed this idea for our events.

    I have missed first half of the talks with fixing problem with dynamic BuildRequires and second half by talking with Michael Schröder about libsolv-related things. We’ve discussed what modularity would mean for libsolv, some known corner-cases and I promised to write document which describes how it is supposed to be handled (some kind of test cases).

    Then there was some kind of meetup of OBS (Open Build Service) community (both developers and users) where OBS-related things were discussed. I wish we could have something like “RPM buildsystems meetup” where people could discuss problems in different buildsystems (Koji, OBS) and share solutions.

  • Announcing Thorntail 2.4 general availability

    At this year’s Red Hat Summit, Red Hat announced Thorntail 2.4 general availability for Red Hat customers through a subscription to Red Hat Application Runtimes. Red Hat Application Runtimes provides application developers with a variety of application runtimes running on the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform.

  • Container-related content you might have missed at Red Hat Summit

    If you weren’t lucky enough to attend the recent Red Hat Summit or you went but couldn’t make it to all the container-related sessions, worry not. We teamed up with Scott McCarty, Principal Technology Product Manager–Containers at Red Hat, to bring you an overview of what you missed.

  • Aging in the open: How this community changed us

    A passionate and dedicated community offers few of these comforts. Participating in something like the open organization community at Opensource.com—which turns four years old this week—means acquiescing to dynamism, to constant change. Every day brings novelty. Every correspondence is packed with possibility. Every interaction reveals undisclosed pathways.

    To a certain type of person (me again), it can be downright terrifying.

    But that unrelenting and genuine surprise is the very source of a community's richness, its sheer abundance. If a community is the nucleus of all those reactions that catalyze innovations and breakthroughs, then unpredictability and serendipity are its fuel. I've learned to appreciate it—more accurately, perhaps, to stand in awe of it. Four years ago, when the Opensource.com team heeded Jim Whitehurst's call to build a space for others to "share your thoughts and opinions… on how you think we can all lead and work better in the future" (see the final page of The Open Organization), we had little more than a mandate, a platform, and a vision. We'd be an open organization committed to studying, learning from, and propagating open organizations. The rest was a surprise—or rather, a series of surprises:

  • May 2019 License-Discuss Summary

    The corresponding License-Review summary is online at https://opensource.org/LicenseReview052019 and covers extensive debate on the Cryptographic Autonomy License, as well as discussion on a BSD license variant.

  • May 2019 License-Review Summary

    In May, the License-Review mailing list saw extensive debate on the Cryptographic Autonomy License. The list also discussed a BSD variant used by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and the Master-Console license.

    The corresponding License-Discuss summary is online at https://opensource.org/LicenseDiscuss052019 and covers an announcement regarding the role of the License-Review list, discussion on the comprehensiveness of the approved license list, and other topics.

Media Calls OpenSUSE a "Windows App" and SUSE Shares Story About SUSE Cloud Application Platform

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SUSE
  • Best Windows 10 apps this week [Ed: They are calling SUSE "Windows app"]
  • An Early Adopters Story about SUSE Cloud Application Platform

    At the recent SUSECON conference in Nashville, Nicolas Christener and Lucas Bickel from our partner, Adfinis SyGroup AG, talked about their experience deploying and running SUSE Cloud Application Platform at the Swiss Federal Office of Information Technology, Systems and Telecommunication.

    They talk about the journey from containers to Cloud Foundry and what Cloud Foundry offers for developers on top of Kubernetes before explaining the requirements their customer had. Next, they describe the various use cases for the platform and how those map to the various types of users. The real meat of it in the lessons learned in using the platform, and the challenges in integrating it into an existing environment. Then they wrap it up with a discussion of how the platform can help enable devops.

openSUSE Leap 42.3 Linux OS to Reach End of Life on June 30th, 2019

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OS
SUSE

Launched on July 26, 2017, OpenSuSE Leap 42.3 was based on the SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12 Service Pack (SP) 3 operating system and it was powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel series.

openSUSE Leap 42.3 was initially supposed to be supported until January 2019, but the openSUSE Project decided to give users six more months to upgrade to the latest openSUSE Leap 15 operating system series.

Now that openSUSE Leap 15.1 is here as the latest and greatest openSUSE Leap release, it's time for openSUSE Leap 42.3 users to upgrade their installations, and they only have one month to do that, until June 30th, 2019.

Read more

OpenSUSE/SUSE: Governance Options, Proprietary Software and SUSECON

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SUSE
  • openSUSE considers governance options

    The relationship between SUSE and the openSUSE community is currently under discussion as the community considers different options for how it wants to be organized and governed in the future. Among the options under consideration is the possibility of openSUSE setting up an entirely independent foundation, as it seeks greater autonomy and control over its own future and operations.

    The concerns that have led to the discussions have been ongoing for several months and were highlighted in an openSUSE board meeting held on April 2 and in a followup meeting on April 16. The issue is also set to be a primary topic of discussion at the board meeting to be held during the upcoming openSUSE conference 2019. SUSE itself has been in a state of transition, recently spinning out from MicroFocus to become an independent company with the backing of private equity from EQT. Both openSUSE board chair Richard Brown and SUSE leadership have publicly reiterated that SUSE remains committed to openSUSE. The concerns however have to do with the ability of openSUSE to be able to operate in a sustainable way without being entirely beholden to SUSE.

  • Oracle Database 19c is Available on SUSE Linux Enterprise

    While attending Oracle OpenWorld late last year, I was able to hear firsthand from Oracle Product Management about the new features in Oracle Database 19c. At that time, this release was in beta. Thanks to combined efforts from Oracle and SUSE engineering, I am pleased to report that Oracle Database 19c is certified on SLES (SUSE Linux Enterprise Server) 12. This brings a wide range of enhancements covering application development, availability, big data / data warehousing, diagnostics capabilities, performance, RAC (Real Application Clusters) / Grid, and security to Oracle customers using SLES.

  • SUSECON Wrap-up: SUSE Cloud Application Platform

    Now that SUSECON 2019 has wrapped up, I wanted to share all the information and articles related to SUSE Cloud Application Platform in one place. SUSECON was a really interesting conference, obviously focused on SUSE products and services, but also attended by partners, press, analysts, and customers. It was great to have so many substantive conversations with them. Many SUSE employees work remotely or are distributed at various offices around the world, so it was also great to meet so many colleagues in person for the first time.

    The big news from SUSECON, from my biased point of view, was the announcement of SUSE Cloud Application Platform 1.4, the first Cloud Foundry software distribution to include Project Eirini and enable native Kubernetes container scheduling as an option, in addition to adding support for Google Kubernetes Engine and several other useful features and updates.

OpenSUSE Leap 15.1 Is Performing Very Well On AMD EPYC

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
SUSE

OpenSUSE/SUSE has always tended to perform well on AMD hardware given the close collaboration between the two companies for many years on numerous fronts going back to the original Linux AMD64 kernel upbringing to the RadeonHD driver days, compiler collaboration, and numerous other activities between SUSE and AMD. With last week's release of openSUSE Leap 15.1, the performance on AMD EPYC servers is even more competitive thanks to various upgrades.

OpenSUSE Leap 15.1 was released last week and based off the sources of SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP1. Leap 15.1 updates its Linux 4.12 kernel with more back-ports/upgrades, updates various components from systemd to other packages, minor improvements to its GCC7 compiler (also offering a GCC8 option though not tested as part of this article), Java OpenJDK 11 by default, and other upgrades.

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Events: Linux Plumbers, SUSE in Germany and LibreOffice Paris HackFest

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LibO
Linux
SUSE
  • Linux Plumbers Earlybird Registration Quota Reached, Regular Registration Opens 30 June

    A few days ago we added more capacity to the earlybird registration quota, but that too has now filled up, so your next opportunity to register for Plumbers will be Regular Registration on 30 June … or alternatively the call for presentations to the refereed track is still open and accepted talks will get a free pass.

  • Gartner IT Infrastructure, Operations and Cloud Strategies Conference Frankfurt 2019

    In a week’s time, team SUSE will be heading to Frankfurt, Germany for this year’s Gartner IT Infrastructure, Operations and Cloud Strategies Conference. Hundreds of attendees from all around Europe will be paying Kap Europa Congress Centre in Frankfurt a visit – to network, speak to exhibitors, pick up valuable nuggets of information from the Gartner analysts, attend sessions to learn more about the latest happenings in IT infrastructure and operations and enjoy all that the beautiful city of Frankfurt has to offer.

  • LibreOffice Paris HackFest

    The LibreOffice Paris HackFest 2019 will take place on the weekend of July 5th-6th, at le 137, which is at 137 Boulevard Magenta, Paris 10e, France. The event is sponsored by INNO3, hosting the hackfest in their building, and The Document Foundation, providing reimbursement for travels and accommodations.

    LibreOffice Paris HackFest will start on Friday at 10AM. During the day there will be an informal meeting of the French community, to discuss local activities, while developers and other volunteers will hack the LibreOffice code. The venue will be available until 2AM. On Saturday the venue will open at 10AM, to allow people to continue working, and share hackfest results. The event will officially end at 8PM, but on Sunday there will be a city tour.

Servers: SUSE, Red Hat/IBM and Kubernetes/Containers

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
SUSE
  • SuSE storage spins-up Ceph

    Open source software platform company SuSE has announced SUSE Enterprise Storage 6, a software-defined storage solution powered by Ceph technology.

    Many would argue that storage on its own is snorage (i.e. enough to send you to sleep), but software -defined storage does at least drive us forward into the realm of the software developer.

    By way of a reminder, software -defined storage is a way of managing data storage resources and functionality that is essentially uncoupled from (i.e. has no underlying physical dependencies) the actual hardware resources that offer up the amount of storage being used.

  • IBM Open Sources Razee CD Tool to Support Mega Kubernetes Scaling

    IBM open sourced its Razee continuous delivery (CD) tool that allows developers to manage applications in their Kubernetes-based cluster deployments. The move also continues to bolster IBM’s push into the Kubernetes space.

    Razee consists of two parts: Kaptain, which are components that handle the multi-cluster deployments; and RazeeDash, which is basically the control panel.

    The Kaptain component within Razee provides a pull-based deployment model that supports self-updating clusters. This helps in generating inventory and scripts that describe actions for each cluster or each application running in a Kubernetes environment.

  • Red Hat Open Sources 3scale Code

    Red Hat has completed open sourcing the API management software of 3scale, the company it bought in June 2016 for an undisclosed sum, saying it has been working on the project for the past three years.

    The company’s full code base has been released under the permissive Apache Software License (ASL) 2.0 licence, with the open sourcing process “much more than throwing code over the wall”, Red Hat said.

    In a short post by the company’s David Codelli on Thursday, he noted: “When Red Hat acquires 3scale it was only a matter of time until it would be open sourced in some fashion. “But the process isn’t instantaneous.”

  • Digital Ocean’s Kubernetes service is now generally available

    Like any ambitious cloud infrastructure player, Digital Ocean also recently announced a solution for running Kubernetes  clusters on its platform. At KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe in Barcelona, the company today announced that Digital Ocean Kubernetes is now generally available.

    With this release, the company is also bringing the latest Kubernetes release (1.14) to the platform, and developers who use the service will be able to schedule automatic patch version upgrades, too.

  • Serverless and containers: Two great technologies that work better together

    Cloud native models using containerized software in a continuous delivery approach could benefit from serverless computing where the cloud vendor generates the exact amount of resources required to run a workload on the fly. While the major cloud vendors have recognized this and are already creating products to abstract away the infrastructure, it may not work for every situation in spite of the benefits.

    Cloud native, put simply, involves using containerized applications and Kubernetes  to deliver software in small packages called microservices. This enables developers to build and deliver software faster and more efficiently in a continuous delivery model. In the cloud native world, you should be able to develop code once and run it anywhere, on prem or any public cloud, or at least that is the ideal.

SUSE: Richard Brown of openSUSE and SLES 12

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SUSE
  • Destination Linux EP122 – Richard Brown of openSUSE

    On this episode of Destination Linux we sit down with Richard Brown, of openSUSE, for an interview about his journey into Linux and becoming the Chairman of openSUSE.

  • Major Distro Upgrade In The Public Cloud Made Easy

    Well, SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 15 has been released for a while and SLES 15 SP1 is on the horizon. While there will be another service pack in the SLES 12 series, SLES 12 SP5, many people have expressed interest to move to SLES 15 from SLES 12. After providing a “Follow this long tedious manual process” procedure for the SLES 11 to SLES 12 migration that was certainly not for the faint of heart we wanted to provide a better easier way to migrate an instance while at the same time avoiding some of the pitfalls that are inherent in a running system migration. This gave birth to the suse-migration-services project. We are happy to announce the availability of the migration in the SLES 12 Public Cloud module.

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Events: KVM Forum 2019 and "Bar Charts for Diversity"

  • A recap of KVM Forum 2019

    The 13th KVM Forum virtualization conference took place in Lyon, France in October 2019. One might think that development may have finished on the Kernel Virtual Machine (KVM) module that was merged in Linux 2.6.20 in 2007, but this year's conference underscored the amount of work still being done, particularly on side-channel attack mitigation, I/O device assignment with VFIO and mdev, footprint reduction with micro virtual machines (VMs), and with the ability to run VMs nested within VMs. Many talks also involved the virtual machine monitor (VMM) user-space programs that use the KVM kernel module—of which QEMU is the most widely used.

  • Enhancing KVM for guest protection and security

    A key tenet in KVM is to reuse as much Linux infrastructure as possible and focus specifically on processor virtualization. Back in 2007, this meant a smaller code base and less friction with the other kernel subsystems, especially when compared with other virtualization technologies such as Xen. This led to KVM being merged into the mainline with relative ease. But now, in the era of microarchitectural vulnerabilities, the priorities have shifted, and the KVM's reliance on other kernel subsystems can be a liability. For one thing, the host kernel widens the TCB (Trusted Computing Base) and makes for a larger attack surface. In addition, kernel data structures such as the direct memory map give Linux access to guest memory even when it is not strictly necessary and make it impossible to fully enforce the principle of least privilege. In his talk "Enhancing KVM for Guest Protection and Security" (slides [PDF]) presented at KVM Forum 2019, long-time KVM contributor Jun Nakajima explained this risk and suggested some strategies to mitigate it.

  • Bar charts for diversity

    At the Linux App Summit I gave an unconference talk titles Hey guys, this conference is for everyone. The “hey guys” part refers to excluding people from a talk or making them feel uncomfortable – you can do this unintentionally, and the take-away of the talk was that you, (yes, you) can be better. I illustrated this mostly with conversational distance, a favorite topic of mine that I can demonstrate easily on stage. There’s a lot of diversity in how far people stand away from strangers, while explaining something they care about. The talk wasn’t recorded, but I’ve put the slides up. Another side of diversity can be dealt with by statistics. Since I’m a mathematician, I have a big jar of peanuts and raisins in the kitchen. Late at night I head down to the kitchen and grab ten items from the jar. Darn, all of them are raisins. What are the odds!? Well, a lot depends on whether there are any peanuts in the jar at all; what percentage is peanuts; whether I’m actually picking things randomly or not. There’s a convenient tool that Katarina Behrens pointed me to, which can help figure this out. Even if there’s only a tiny fraction of peanuts in the jar, there’s an appreciable chance of getting one (e.g. change the percentage on that page to 5% and you’ll see).

Linux on the MAG1 8.9 inch mini-laptop (Ubuntu and Fedora)

The Magic Ben MAG1 mini-laptop is a 1.5 pound notebook computer that measures about 8.2″ x 5.8″ x 0.7″ and which features an 8.9 inch touchscreen display and an Intel Core m3-8100Y processor. As I noted in my MAG1 review, the little computer also has one of the best keyboards I’ve used on a laptop this small and a tiny, but responsive trackpad below the backlit keyboard. Available from GeekBuying for $630 and up, the MAG1 ships with Windows 10, but it’s also one of the most Linux-friendly mini-laptops I’ve tested to date. [...] I did not install either operating system to local storage, so I cannot comment on sleep, battery life, fingerprint authentication, or other features that you’d only be able to truly test by fully installing Ubuntu, Fedora, or another GNU/Linux-based operating system. But running from a liveUSB is a good way to kick the tires and see if there are any obvious pain points before installing an operating system, and for the most part the two operating systems I tested look good to go. Booting from a flash drive is also pretty easy. Once you’ve prepared a bootable drive using Rufus, UNetbootin, or a similar tool, just plug it into the computer’s USB port, hit the Esc key during startup to bring up the UEFI/SETUP utility. Read more Also: Top 10 technical skills that will get you hired in 2020

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