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SUSE

Review: openSUSE Leap 15.1

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Reviews
SUSE

openSUSE is one of those distros I have always been interested in but which I had never used for more than a few hours. Recently the project released Leap 15.1, which was a good enough reason to give the distro a proper spin.

The distro hardly needs an introduction. It is a community project sponsored by SUSE, one of the larger commercial Linux vendors. openSUSE maintains two distros: Tumbleweed is a rolling release distro and upstream to SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE). Leap is a stable (non-rolling) distro that is downstream to SLE. A new version of Leap is released roughly once a year, and each version is supported for 18 months. The Leap 15.x series as a whole is supported for three years.

openSUSE is probably best known for the Btrfs file system, Snapper and YaST. As Leap 15.1 is a relatively small, conservative upgrade from 15.0 I will mainly focus on these features. I will also have a look at where things may be heading.

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People of openSUSE: Stasiek Michalski

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SUSE

I’ve been using computers for as long as I can remember, playing Solitaire, The Settlers, and other simple DOS games, because that’s what my parents and grandma liked to play. I started with Win95, 98, and 2000, before learning about Linux.

My interest in design was sparked by the original iPhone icons, which I loved. In contrast with my hatred toward the Faenza icon theme, both have fairly similar style yet widely different results. That’s how I began exploring and learned from there.

Correspondingly, my Linux journey started back in 2007 when my dad showed me Ubuntu, and just like what I did with Windows 2000 before, my pastime became installing and reinstalling Linux alongside Windows in different configurations (I apparently was consumed by the concept of installation and configuration, which might explain my YaST obsession?).

Later in 2010, I had a tough time with a machine that wouldn’t take any distro with the exception of openSUSE (although it did end up with a few Linuxrc errors). Besides, I really liked its GNOME 2 config back then; it was really user friendly yet powerful. I gave KDE a shot but to this day I never really liked it.

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Mesa, VirtualBox, Ceph, NetworkManager Packages Update in Tumbleweed

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SUSE

Three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots have been released in the first four days of June, which bring several minor package updates to the rolling release.

The 20190604 snapshot brought babl 0.1.64, which provided some code consistency, gitlab Continuous Integration (CI), autotools and meson build improvements. An accident in naming caused the 0.3.2 version of bubblewrap to become version 0.3.3. However, bubblewrap 0.3.3. did address a Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE), provided a few smaller fixes and added the JSON Application Programming Interface (API) that allows reading the inner process exit code. GNU Compiler Collection 8 had some updates that included a couple patches with one that makes builds without profiling reproducible. Generic Graphics Library gegl 0.4.16 also added gitlab CI and uses a custom allocator for tile data, which aligns data and groups allocations in blocks; this was achieved on Linux by using the GNU extension malloc_trim to permit forcing invocation of the glibc malloc/free allocators garbage collection function. Oracle’ virtualbox 6.0.8 had a minor maintenance release that fixed a crash when powering off a Virtual Machine without a graphics controller and xorg-x11-server 1.20.5 fixed some input. The snapshot is currently trending at a 96 rating, according to the snapshot reviewer.

Snapshot 20190603 updated Mesa and Mesa-drivers to version 19.0.5 and took care of some core code and drivers. NetworkManager 1.16.2 fixed some wrong permissions of the /var/lib/NetworkManager/secret_key file. Ceph’s minor version update disabled Link Time Optimisation in spec when being used. GNOME 3.32.2 had several package updates and fixes including the fix of a regression that caused the fonts category to go missing. Tumbleweed skipped over the 1.3.0 series of Flatpak directly to version 1.4.0. The major changes since 1.2.4 is the improved I/O use for system-installed applications, and the new format for pre-configured remotes. Glib2 2.60.3 updated translations and provided various fixes to small key/value support in GHashTable. Scripting language php7 7.3.6 added a missing curl_version and fixed several other bugs. The snapshot is currently trending at a 95 rating, according to the snapshot reviewer.

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SUSE on Servers

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SUSE
  • The University of Maine: High-Performance Computing, Climate Change Research, and Ocean Modeling created a Whale of an appetite when it comes to data. SUSE Enterprise Storage satisfied that appetite!

    With research projects like climate change research and ocean modeling, the university’s high-performance computing center is generating data like a Whale eating Krill.  And that’s a whole lot considering a Blue Whale will consume some 40 million Krill, or about 8000 pounds daily.  The University of Maine is one of only 11 Land, Sea and Space grant institutions in the country. And establishing a stronger and more flexible HPC and storage infrastructure is integral to their success.  It also supports the people of Maine and its businesses across a wide variety of activities.

    Their challenge was with all the current and new larger research projects it increased the demands on data storage and the amount of data collected and consumed. For example, one project at the University of Maine generates high-resolution ocean models to map climate change and requires half a petabyte of data. Another project, employing deep learning to help detect tumors, requires a single directory with over two million files. With these projects and more, the university’s storage architecture was on the brink of collapse under the strain of these diverse and demanding data workloads. The existing system was difficult to scale up and tight budgets would not support a rip-and-replace of the entire system.

  • The Holy Grail of PaaS on Kubernetes

    Kubernetes will solve all of our problems right? It’s the container platform that will allow our development teams to deploy their microservice applications in all their cloud native glory. We’ll all be able to deploy our web apps without needing to worry about the servers that are running them or interact with the system administrators that look after those servers. Self-service for Developers!

SUSE: openSUSE, Stichting Praktijkleren and Eclipse

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SUSE
  • OpenSUSE may go independent from SUSE, reports LWN.net

    Lately, the relationship between SUSE and openSUSE community has been under discussion. Different options are being considered, among which the possibility of setting up openSUSE into an entirely independent foundation is gaining momentum. This will enable openSUSE to have greater autonomy and control over its own future and operations.

    Though openSUSE board chair Richard Brown and SUSE leadership have publicly reiterated that SUSE remains committed to openSUSE. There has been a lot of concern over the ability of openSUSE to be able to operate in a sustainable way, without being entirely beholden to SUSE.

  • Stichting Praktijkleren partners with the SUSE Academic Program to support local Dutch Academies

    In places like the Netherlands, SUSE relies on academic partners to share all of the free resources of the academic program with local educational communities. A newly established partnership with Stichting Praktijkleren will allow SUSE to reach more Dutch schools and students than ever before. Academy Support Centre (ASC) Praktijkleren is the support centre in the Netherlands that supports academies in promoting up-to-date skills in education. Stichting Praktijkleren has a strong network of academies that join together and bring teachers in contact with providers of relevant up-to-date ICT training courses to prepare students for their professional future in the field of ICT. Already working with a number of schools in the Netherlands, including the Avans Hogeschool and Drenthe College, we hope to see our footprint spread with support from Stichting Praktijkleren.

  • Using Eclipse as an IDE for SUSE Cloud Application Platform

    At the recent SUSECON conference in Nashville, RahulKrishna Gupta from SUSE demonstrated how to integrate the Eclipse IDE with SUSE Cloud Application Platform, showing how to easily develop, test, and deploy applications to the platform directly from Eclipse.
    SUSE has posted all recorded talks from SUSECON on YouTube. Check them out if you want to learn more about what SUSE has to offer. We’re not just Linux anymore! I’ll be posting more SUSE Cloud Application Platform talks here over the coming days. Watch RahulKrishna’s talk below:

OSS: Federation, SUSE, Red Hat/Fedora and OSI Sessions

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Red Hat
OSS
SUSE
  • Federated conference videos

    So, foss-north 2019 happened. 260 visitors. 33 speakers. Four days of madness.

    During my opening of the second day I mentioned some social media statistics. Only 7 of our speakers had mastodon accounts, but 30 had twitter accounts.

  • Chameleon and the dragons

    Arriving to the conference venue on a bike was quite pleasant (thanks to bicycle paths almost everywhere in city and amount of parks). One thing which I forgot is the bike lock, but I met Richard Brown and he offered to lock our bikes together.

    First thing which brought my attention was some QR-code on the registration desk which says something like “This is not the first one, search better,” so I had to walk around and try to find correct one. There were 10 of them in different places of Biergarten, each is asking you some question about openSUSE (logos, abbreviations, versions and so on). Once you find all of them and answer correctly, you can pick up prize on registration desk. I really enjoyed this so I proposed this idea for our events.

    I have missed first half of the talks with fixing problem with dynamic BuildRequires and second half by talking with Michael Schröder about libsolv-related things. We’ve discussed what modularity would mean for libsolv, some known corner-cases and I promised to write document which describes how it is supposed to be handled (some kind of test cases).

    Then there was some kind of meetup of OBS (Open Build Service) community (both developers and users) where OBS-related things were discussed. I wish we could have something like “RPM buildsystems meetup” where people could discuss problems in different buildsystems (Koji, OBS) and share solutions.

  • Announcing Thorntail 2.4 general availability

    At this year’s Red Hat Summit, Red Hat announced Thorntail 2.4 general availability for Red Hat customers through a subscription to Red Hat Application Runtimes. Red Hat Application Runtimes provides application developers with a variety of application runtimes running on the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform.

  • Container-related content you might have missed at Red Hat Summit

    If you weren’t lucky enough to attend the recent Red Hat Summit or you went but couldn’t make it to all the container-related sessions, worry not. We teamed up with Scott McCarty, Principal Technology Product Manager–Containers at Red Hat, to bring you an overview of what you missed.

  • Aging in the open: How this community changed us

    A passionate and dedicated community offers few of these comforts. Participating in something like the open organization community at Opensource.com—which turns four years old this week—means acquiescing to dynamism, to constant change. Every day brings novelty. Every correspondence is packed with possibility. Every interaction reveals undisclosed pathways.

    To a certain type of person (me again), it can be downright terrifying.

    But that unrelenting and genuine surprise is the very source of a community's richness, its sheer abundance. If a community is the nucleus of all those reactions that catalyze innovations and breakthroughs, then unpredictability and serendipity are its fuel. I've learned to appreciate it—more accurately, perhaps, to stand in awe of it. Four years ago, when the Opensource.com team heeded Jim Whitehurst's call to build a space for others to "share your thoughts and opinions… on how you think we can all lead and work better in the future" (see the final page of The Open Organization), we had little more than a mandate, a platform, and a vision. We'd be an open organization committed to studying, learning from, and propagating open organizations. The rest was a surprise—or rather, a series of surprises:

  • May 2019 License-Discuss Summary

    The corresponding License-Review summary is online at https://opensource.org/LicenseReview052019 and covers extensive debate on the Cryptographic Autonomy License, as well as discussion on a BSD license variant.

  • May 2019 License-Review Summary

    In May, the License-Review mailing list saw extensive debate on the Cryptographic Autonomy License. The list also discussed a BSD variant used by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and the Master-Console license.

    The corresponding License-Discuss summary is online at https://opensource.org/LicenseDiscuss052019 and covers an announcement regarding the role of the License-Review list, discussion on the comprehensiveness of the approved license list, and other topics.

Media Calls OpenSUSE a "Windows App" and SUSE Shares Story About SUSE Cloud Application Platform

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SUSE
  • Best Windows 10 apps this week [Ed: They are calling SUSE "Windows app"]
  • An Early Adopters Story about SUSE Cloud Application Platform

    At the recent SUSECON conference in Nashville, Nicolas Christener and Lucas Bickel from our partner, Adfinis SyGroup AG, talked about their experience deploying and running SUSE Cloud Application Platform at the Swiss Federal Office of Information Technology, Systems and Telecommunication.

    They talk about the journey from containers to Cloud Foundry and what Cloud Foundry offers for developers on top of Kubernetes before explaining the requirements their customer had. Next, they describe the various use cases for the platform and how those map to the various types of users. The real meat of it in the lessons learned in using the platform, and the challenges in integrating it into an existing environment. Then they wrap it up with a discussion of how the platform can help enable devops.

openSUSE Leap 42.3 Linux OS to Reach End of Life on June 30th, 2019

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OS
SUSE

Launched on July 26, 2017, OpenSuSE Leap 42.3 was based on the SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12 Service Pack (SP) 3 operating system and it was powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel series.

openSUSE Leap 42.3 was initially supposed to be supported until January 2019, but the openSUSE Project decided to give users six more months to upgrade to the latest openSUSE Leap 15 operating system series.

Now that openSUSE Leap 15.1 is here as the latest and greatest openSUSE Leap release, it's time for openSUSE Leap 42.3 users to upgrade their installations, and they only have one month to do that, until June 30th, 2019.

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OpenSUSE/SUSE: Governance Options, Proprietary Software and SUSECON

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SUSE
  • openSUSE considers governance options

    The relationship between SUSE and the openSUSE community is currently under discussion as the community considers different options for how it wants to be organized and governed in the future. Among the options under consideration is the possibility of openSUSE setting up an entirely independent foundation, as it seeks greater autonomy and control over its own future and operations.

    The concerns that have led to the discussions have been ongoing for several months and were highlighted in an openSUSE board meeting held on April 2 and in a followup meeting on April 16. The issue is also set to be a primary topic of discussion at the board meeting to be held during the upcoming openSUSE conference 2019. SUSE itself has been in a state of transition, recently spinning out from MicroFocus to become an independent company with the backing of private equity from EQT. Both openSUSE board chair Richard Brown and SUSE leadership have publicly reiterated that SUSE remains committed to openSUSE. The concerns however have to do with the ability of openSUSE to be able to operate in a sustainable way without being entirely beholden to SUSE.

  • Oracle Database 19c is Available on SUSE Linux Enterprise

    While attending Oracle OpenWorld late last year, I was able to hear firsthand from Oracle Product Management about the new features in Oracle Database 19c. At that time, this release was in beta. Thanks to combined efforts from Oracle and SUSE engineering, I am pleased to report that Oracle Database 19c is certified on SLES (SUSE Linux Enterprise Server) 12. This brings a wide range of enhancements covering application development, availability, big data / data warehousing, diagnostics capabilities, performance, RAC (Real Application Clusters) / Grid, and security to Oracle customers using SLES.

  • SUSECON Wrap-up: SUSE Cloud Application Platform

    Now that SUSECON 2019 has wrapped up, I wanted to share all the information and articles related to SUSE Cloud Application Platform in one place. SUSECON was a really interesting conference, obviously focused on SUSE products and services, but also attended by partners, press, analysts, and customers. It was great to have so many substantive conversations with them. Many SUSE employees work remotely or are distributed at various offices around the world, so it was also great to meet so many colleagues in person for the first time.

    The big news from SUSECON, from my biased point of view, was the announcement of SUSE Cloud Application Platform 1.4, the first Cloud Foundry software distribution to include Project Eirini and enable native Kubernetes container scheduling as an option, in addition to adding support for Google Kubernetes Engine and several other useful features and updates.

OpenSUSE Leap 15.1 Is Performing Very Well On AMD EPYC

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Graphics/Benchmarks
SUSE

OpenSUSE/SUSE has always tended to perform well on AMD hardware given the close collaboration between the two companies for many years on numerous fronts going back to the original Linux AMD64 kernel upbringing to the RadeonHD driver days, compiler collaboration, and numerous other activities between SUSE and AMD. With last week's release of openSUSE Leap 15.1, the performance on AMD EPYC servers is even more competitive thanks to various upgrades.

OpenSUSE Leap 15.1 was released last week and based off the sources of SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP1. Leap 15.1 updates its Linux 4.12 kernel with more back-ports/upgrades, updates various components from systemd to other packages, minor improvements to its GCC7 compiler (also offering a GCC8 option though not tested as part of this article), Java OpenJDK 11 by default, and other upgrades.

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More in Tux Machines

Compact Ryzen V1000 system starts at $689 with pre-loaded Ubuntu

Simply NUC’s compact “Sequoia” computer features a quad-core Ryzen Embedded V1000, 0 to 60°C support, and an 8-32V input. It starts at $689 with 4GB DDR4, a 128GB SSD, 2x mini-DP++, 3x USB, 2x GbE, 2x COM, and pre-installed Ubuntu. Simply NUC, which distributes Intel NUC systems such as the recent, Apollo Lake based NUC 8 Rugged, has launched its first AMD-powered computer with a semi-rugged embedded system built around the AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000. Aimed at edge analytics, electronic kiosks, digital signage, POS, robotics, and industrial computers, the Sequoia is available for pre-order, with shipments due in January. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Monitoring Bandwidth On Linux: Top 5 Tools in 2019

    Don’t we all wish our networks had infinite bandwidth? The reality is, however, that it is often a severely limited resource. Add to that the fact that bandwidth over-utilization can have huge impacts on network performance and we have a recipe for disaster. The solution: set up some bandwidth monitoring system. A lot of them are available. Most of them run on Windows, though, and if your OS of choice it Linux, your options are slightly more limited. You still have plenty of options, however, and we’re about to introduce the best tools for bandwidth monitoring on Linux. We’ll begin by introducing bandwidth monitoring and explain what it is. Next, we’ll cover the ins and outs of the Simple Network Management Protocol, or SNMP, one of the most-used monitoring technology. Our next order of business will be to have a look a Linux as an operating system but, more specifically, as a platform for monitoring tools. And finally, we’ll briefly review some of the best tools for bandwidth monitoring on Linux and describe their best features.

  • Bangle.js — A Hackable Smartwatch Powered By Google’s TensorFlow

    The world of smartwatches is ruled mostly by the likes of Apple Watch and WearOS-based devices. But we have seen a few attempts from the open-source community, including PineTime and AsteroidOS. Now, the tech world has got something new to play with — an open-source hackable smartwatch called Bangle.js. It’s co-developed by NearForm Research and Espruino, which showcased its latest offering to the attendees of the NodeConf 2019. Until now, the two companies provided digital badges at the conference.

  • Can Google’s New Open Source Tool Make Kubernetes Less Painful?

    Google has pushed Skaffold – a command line tool that automates Kubernetes development workflow – out to the developer community, saying the tool is now generally available after 5,000 commits from nearly 150 contributors to the project. Kubernetes – the de facto container orchestration standard – has become the linchpin of much cloud-native computing, sitting underneath swathes of cloud-based tools to manage how applications run across a wide range computing environments.

  • Molly de Blanc: Rebellion

    We spend a lot of time focusing on the epic side of free software and user freedom: joys come from providing encrypted communication options to journalists and political dissidents; losses are when IoT devices are used to victimize and abuse. I think a lot about the little ways technology interacts with our lives, the threats to or successes for user freedom we encounter in regular situations that anyone can find themselves able to understand: sexting with a secure app, sharing DRM-free piece of media, or having your communications listened to by a “home assistant.” When I was writing a talk about ethics and IoT, I was looking for these small examples of the threats posed by smart doorbells. False arrests and racial profiling, deals with law enforcement to monitor neighborhoods, the digital panopticon — these are big deals. I remembered something I read about kids giving their neighbor a pair of slippers for Christmas. This sort of anonymous gift giving becomes impossible when your front door is constantly being monitored. People laughed when I shared this idea with them — that we’re really losing something by giving up the opportunity to anonymously leave presents. We are also giving up what my roommate calls “benign acts of rebellion.” From one perspective, making it harder for teenagers to sneak out at night is a good thing. Keeping better tabs on your kids and where they are is a safety issue. Being able to monitor what they do on their computer can prevent descent into objectively bad communities and behavior patterns, but it can also prevent someone from participating in the cultural coming of age narratives that help define who we are as a society and give us points of connection across generations.

  • FOSSA Wins CNBC Upstart 100 Award [Ed: FOSSA can be a misleading name. They merely deal with data about FOSS but are themselves not FOSS but proprietary software.]

    FOSSA, the open source management company, today announced that it has been selected for the prestigious Upstart 100 List, CNBC's annual list of 100 top startups to watch. The Upstart 100 is an exclusive collection of companies that are building brands, raising money and creating jobs on their path to becoming tomorrow's household names. CNBC's selection committee chose FOSSA from more than 600 nominees, scored across eight equally weighted quantitative metrics, including scalability, sales growth and workforce diversity.

  • Fugue Fregot is now open sourced to enhance the experience working with the Rego policy language

    Rego is part of the Open Policy Agent (OPA) policy engine, which Fugue adopted this year as its policy as code implementation for cloud security and compliance. Developed as an alternative to Open Policy Agent’s (OPA) built-in interpreter, Fregot provides error handling that is easy to understand and manage with step-by-step debugging.

  • Chrome, Edge, Safari hacked at elite Chinese hacking contest
  • The Relationship Between Open Source Software and Standard Setting

    Standards and open source development are both processes widely adopted in the ICT industry to develop innovative technologies and drive their adoption in the market. Innovators and policy makers assume that a closer collaboration between standards and open source software development would be mutually beneficial. The interaction between the two is however not yet fully understood, especially with regard to how the intellectual property regimes applied by these organisations influence their ability and motivation to cooperate. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of the interaction between standard development organisations (SDOs) and open source software (OSS) communities. The analysis is based on 20 case studies, a survey of stakeholders involved in SDOs and OSS communities, an expert workshop, and a comprehensive review of the literature. In the analysis, we differentiate according to the governance of SDOs and OSS communities, but also considering the involved stakeholders and subject matter. We discuss the preconditions, forms and impacts of collaboration, before we eventually focus on the complementarity of the different Intellectual Property Right (IPR) regimes. Finally, we derive policy recommendations addressing SDOs, OSS communities and policy makers.

Programming: OpenBSD, FreddieMeter, Python and More

  • [Older] Linux Systems Performance

    Systems performance is an effective discipline for performance analysis and tuning, and can help you find performance wins for your applications and the kernel. However, most of us are not performance or kernel engineers, and have limited time to study this topic. This talk summarizes the topic for everyone, touring six important areas of Linux systems performance: observability tools, methodologies, benchmarking, profiling, tracing, and tuning. Included are recipes for Linux performance analysis and tuning (using vmstat, mpstat, iostat, etc), overviews of complex areas including profiling (perf_events) and tracing (Ftrace, bcc/BPF, and bpftrace/BPF), and much advice about what is and isn't important to learn. This talk is aimed at everyone: developers, operations, sysadmins, etc, and in any environment running Linux, bare metal or the cloud.

  • Martin Pieuchot: The Unknown Plan

    Since I attend OpenBSD hackathons, I hear stories about how crazy are the ports hackathons. So I try my best to look like a porter in order to experience this craziness. I must admit p2k19 was awesome but the craziness of port hackathons is still an enigma to me.

  • Google's AI-powered FreddieMeter can tell if you sing like Queen's frontman

    While Freddie may have sadly bitten the dust, his fame lives on, so much so that Google's Creative Lab has cooked up the FreddieMeter.

    The show must go on! It's an AI-powered thingy which uses its smarts to figure out if one's singing voice has a pitch, melody and timbre to match that of Mercury's champion vocals.

  • What is Python? Powerful, intuitive programming

    Why the Python programming language shines for data science, machine learning, systems automation, web and API development, and more.

  • Ian Ozsvald: Training Courses for 2020 Q1 – Successful Data Science Projects & Software Engineering for Data Scientists
  • The simplest explanation of Decorators in Python

    Before starting about decorators, first, understand that functions in python have below three properties.

  • Basic Data Types in Python 3: Booleans

    Welcome back to our ongoing series of blog posts on basic data types in Python 3! Last time, we explored the functionality of strings. Today, we dive in to another key data type - booleans. Booleans (and "boolean logic") are an important concept in programming, representing the concept of "true" and "false". If you're learning Python, you might also want to check out TwilioQuest 3. You'll learn about basic data types like the boolean, and much more about Python programming. Ready to learn how to use booleans in Python 3? Let's get started!

Arch Conf 2019 Report

During the 5th and 6th of October, 21 team members attended the very first internal Arch Conf. We spent 2 days at Native Instruments in Berlin having workshops, discussions and hack sessions together. We even managed to get into, and escape, an escape room! It was a great and productive weekend which we hope will continue in the next years. Hopefully we will be able to expand on this in the future and include more community members and users. There is a report available for the workshops and discussions from the conference! Read more