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SUSE

SUSE/OpenSUSE: Reasons To Give OpenSUSE A Try and Move to Online Conferencing

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SUSE
  • Reasons To Give OpenSUSE A Try

    Probably the most special thing about openSUSE is YaST2: The complete control center capable of configuring everything on a Linux system. It comes by default on SUSE & openSUSE distributions. YaST2 is awesome because it contains a lot of options and functionalities.

  • SUSECON Digital – Everything You Hoped For (Except the Guinness)

    For nearly a decade, I have been very fortunate to lead the SUSECON team at SUSE. We have enjoyed double-digit attendance growth every year, and along the way we have made both fans and lifelong friends. Everyone who attends SUSECON comes away with great memories. When asked what the best things about the event were, they reply, “outstanding technical content, open access to subject matter experts, and a true feeling of community.”

    A few weeks ago, for reasons we all know too well, we were presented with a challenge: create an on-line experience that will deliver outstanding technical content, allow for open access to the people who create that content, and still maintain a feeling of community. Since that time, we have been hard at work to create a virtual SUSECON experience that will be as memorable as our live event.

  • Jitsi instance on meet.opensuse.org

    In the times of Covid-19 and the people staying at home it is an adventure to get the tools to work from home without missing the benefits of face-to-face meetings.

    There are a lot of solutions out in the wild. But one promising solution is Jitsi. Until now we used the instances provided by other people.

    But now we are able to introduce:

    Our own Jitsi instance

    It is based on openSUSE Leap 15.1 and uses docker containers to deploy Jitsi. The current security warnings were also considered, furthermore the setup uses secure LDAP and HTTPS.

With coronavirus forcing us to work from home, SUSE suggests the Linux desktop

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GNU
Linux
SUSE

None of the major enterprise Linux companies have been pushing the Linux desktop forward for some time. Their focus for over a decade now has been first on servers, then the cloud, and now, containers and Kubernetes. The Linux desktop has been on the backburner. Even Canonical with its Ubuntu desktop -- perhaps the first name in business Linux desktops these days -- is answering Linux desktop demand and not actually out there marketing it to customers.

The Linux desktop today is driven largely by developers and fans. The most popular Linux desktops, such as MX Linux, Manjaro, and (my own favorite) Linux Mint are community rather than corporate-driven.

But then along came the coronavirus and the sudden rush of people to work from home, and SUSE quickly figured out there was a new, underserved market for the Linux desktop: Companies with little in the way of resources that need to keep their businesses running with what their IT department and users already have at hand.

Read more

openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Now Available on AWS Marketplace

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Now Available on AWS Marketplace

    openSUSE developer Alessandro de Oliveira Faria announced the availability of the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system on the AWS Marketplace.

    openSUSE, as a GNU/Linux distribution, was already available on the AWS (Amazon Web Services) Marketplace, but as the stable openSUSE Leap release.

    As you probably know already, openSUSE also offers a rolling-release version of its operating system, called openSUSE Tumbleweed.

    And the good news is that, as of this month, you can now install openSUSE Tumbleweed as a Linux server on Amazon AWS, and it’s intended for everyone wants to use the latest openSUSE release.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed available on AWS

    I make openSUSE Tumbleweed available on AWS. The Tumbleweed distribution is a pure rolling release version of openSUSE containing the latest stable versions of all software instead of relying on rigid periodic release cycles. The project does this for users that want the newest stable software.

    Tumbleweed is based on Factory, openSUSE’s main development codebase. Tumbleweed is updated once Factory’s bleeding edge software has been integrated, stabilized and tested. Tumbleweed contains the latest stable applications and is ready and reliable for daily use.

SUSE and Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • SAP Data Intelligence Benefits From Linux And Open Source

    If SAP customers already use Suse Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications (SLES for SAP) in combination with Hana or S/4, they will also want to use Suse solutions in combination with SAP Data Hub and Data Intelligence, as it leads to beneficial technological continuity.

  • SUSE CEO: avoiding disruption with open source and how her focus has changed

    In March 2019, the company become independent from MicroFocus, and today continues to provide all of the open source based operating systems that power the applications of mission critical systems. The open source technology is also embedded inside medical device components like CAT scans and mammogram machines.

    SUSE is led by Melissa Di Donato, former Women in IT Awards winner, who became the company’s first female CEO in July 2019.

    “We are the technology backbone that powers many and most mission critical systems and applications. Coupled with that we’ve got a cloud-based application platform for storage and our Container-as-a-Service business as well,” she told Information Age during a recent interview.

  • A tip to play audio (and video) in a browser

    She uses Fedora on her laptop and Firefox as the browser. All of the online tools that the institution uses works just fine. She is able to share presentations, tabs from browsers showing websites etc. The one challenge she encountered was in playing some audio files that are on her laptop.

    For some reason that online platform is not able to pick up the VLC player that will be playing the audio and shared to her students. Did not matter what audio tool was used (Totem, Audacity (yes, that’s an overkill)), that window was not showing up as being shareable. It could be something to do Wayland being used, but I did not want that to be the issue and that it should work everywhere.

  • Emmanuel Kasper: Putting a Red Hat on

    I have heard that there is already a number of Debian Developers working for Red Hat, so if you happen to be one of them, I hope we’ll get in touch !

Sleepless and prepared: SUSE’s Melissa Di Donato draws on open-source’s community spirit

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SUSE

In normal times, asking the chief executive officer of a major technology company what keeps him or her up at night would generally elicit responses ranging from profitability and customer growth to innovation and the pursuit of digital transformation.

But these are not normal times.

“What keeps me up at night now and how I wake up every morning is wondering about the health of my employees,” said Melissa Di Donato (pictured), chief executive officer of SUSE Group. “For us, this is nothing new, and we were really fortunate that we had the mechanisms in place to handle the pandemic first in China and then as it came across Europe and the U.S.”

Read more

Bringing Leap and SUSE Linux Enterprise closer together - a proposal

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SUSE
Hi everyone,

today I have some exciting news and a proposal to relay: SUSE wants to
go another step in openness towards the openSUSE community and suggests
to bring the relationship of openSUSE Leap and SUSE Linux Enterprise to 
a new level.
 

OpenSUSE Leap + SUSE Linux Enterprise Planning To Move Closer In 2020

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SUSE

SUSE and the openSUSE community are working to move SUSE Linux Enterprise and openSUSE Leap closer together.

A proposal sent out today with the interest of SUSE is for taking the openSUSE Leap and SUSE Linux Enterprise relationship to a new level. This new collaboration would more closely align the source trees of openSUSE Leap and SUSE Linux Enterprise Linux, including the use of SUSE Linux Enterprise binaries within Leap.

The plan would involve merging of the code-bases for the intersection of openSUSE Leap 15.2 / SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP2 and moving forward to even create a a new openSUSE Leap 15.2 flavor leveraging SUSE Linux Enterprise binaries.

Read more

Direct: opensuse-announce

Also: Bringing Leap and SUSE Linux Enterprise closer together - a proposal

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • SUSE Cloud Application Platform Air gapped installation

    Containers has become first choice and ask from customers and Kubernetes is the first choice for container orchestration. Cloud native applications are being built. SUSE Cloud Application Platform is a modern application delivery platform used to bring an advance cloud native developer experience to Kubernetes. SUSE has containerized Cloud foundry.

    Container images being downloaded on Kubernetes master and worker nodes when we deploy SUSE Cloud Application Platform. Source of these container images can be SUSE registry site which is registry.suse.com or can be a local registry in the same network of Kubernetes master and worker nodes.

  • SUSE Home Office Workplace: Our offering for your business continuity strategy

    Providing employees in the home office with secure and reliable access to their business-critical applications – that is currently the big challenge for companies. Hardware bottlenecks, limited budgets and enormous time pressure make the implementation of emergency plans more difficult in many organizations. To help you work from home, we offer a cost-effective business continuity solution that you can implement quickly and easily: the SUSE Home Office Workplace.

  • SUSE Manager 4: The Smart Choice for Managing Linux

    “Only SUSE Manager combines software content lifecycle management (CLM) with a centrally staged repository and class-leading configuration management and automation, plus optional state of the art monitoring capabilities, for all major Linux distributions.”

    These days, IT departments manage highly dynamic and heterogeneous networks under constantly changing requirements. One important trend that has contributed to the growing complexity is the rise of software-defined infrastructures (SDIs). An SDI consists of a single pool of virtual resources that system administrators can manage efficiently and always in the same way, regardless of whether the resources reside on premise or in the cloud. SUSE Manager is a powerful tool that brings the promise of SDI to Linux server management.

    You can use SUSE Manager to manage a diverse pool of Linux systems through their complete lifecycle, including deployment, configuration, auditing and software management. This paper highlights some of the benefits of SUSE Manager and describes how SUSE Manager stacks up against other open source management solutions.

  • Automating the SAP HANA High Availability Cluster Deployment for Microsoft Azure

Openwashing and SUSE

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SUSE

Mesa, Nano, Redis, Git Update in openSUSE Tumbleweed

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SUSE

Another four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released this week.

A notable package updated this week is a new major version of (gucharmap)[https://wiki.gnome.org/Apps/Gucharmap]. Plus several python package updates, nano, mesa, git and Xfce packages also had new minor updates.

The most recent snapshot, 202000331 is trending well with a stable rating of 99 on the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer. The GNOME Character Map, gucharmap, updated to version 13.0.0, but no changelog was provided. An update for glib2 2.62.6 is expected to be the final release of the stable 2.62.x series; maintenance efforts will be shifted to the newer 2.64.x series. The updated glib2 package fixed SOCKS5 username/password authentication. The 2.34 binutils package added and removed a few patches. GTK3 3.24.16 fixed problems with clipboard handling and fixed a crash in the Wayland input method. The package for creating business diagrams, kdiagram 2.6.2 fixed printing issue. The Linux Kernel updated to 5.5.13. A handful of Advanced Linux Sound Architecture changes were made in the kernel update. The 5.6.x kernel is expected to be released in a Tumbleweed snapshot soon. The libstorage-ng 4.2.71 package simplified combining disks with different block sizes into RAID. The programming language vala 0.46.7 made verious improvements and bug fixes and properly set CodeNode.error when reporting an error. Several xfce4 packages were updated and xfce4-pulseaudio-plugin 0.4.3 fixed various memory leaks and warnings and xterm 353 was updated. The yast2-firewall 4.2.4 packaged was updated and forces a reset of the firewalld API instance after modifying the service state and yast2-storage-ng 4.2.104 extended and improved the Application Programming Interface to get udev names for a block device

The package to improve audio and video under Linux pipewire 0.3.1 switched the license to MIT and added fdupes BuildRequires and pass fdupes macro while removing duplicate files, which came in snapshot 20200326. The 1.1.9 spec-cleaner package drop travis and tox and now uses github actions. Several python arrived in this snapshot. Python-packaging 20.3 fixed a bug that caused a 32-bit OS that runs on a 64-bit ARM CPU (e.g. ARM-v8, aarch64), to report the wrong bitness and python-SQLAlchemy 1.3.15 fixed regression in 1.3.14. The Xfce file manager package, thunar 1.8.14 updated translations and reverted a bug that introduced a regression. The snapshot recorded a stable rating of 99.

Read more [Post apparently removed[

Also: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/14

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More in Tux Machines

Review: Peppermint OS 10

Peppermint is one of those delightful distributions which does what it says it will do. It sets out to be lightweight, easy to set up, and offer native-like access to web applications. It does all of these things and does them well. I also happen to really like the well-organized settings panel and the friendly software manager. I especially like how mintInstall makes it clear when it is working with Deb or Flatpak packages. While I'm not personally a fan of web applications, I do think Peppermint deserves full credit for making them as easy to use as possible and as native-like as it does. I may never like running my applications over the web, but for people who do like this approach, Peppermint's Ice and SSB features are excellent. Mostly though I'm a big fan of the distribution's combined LXDE/Xfce desktop. It is a mixture of components which works nicely, is fairly easy to configure, and it offers some of the best performance I have had with an open source desktop this year. There are some rough edges. The system installer threw out some errors towards the end of the setup process. Needing to logout and back in to see Flatpaks in the application menu was a pain, but not a deal breaker. On the whole I think Peppermint does a good job of feeling modern while offering good performance and easy to use tools. Read more

Linux 5.10-rc1

Two weeks have passed, and the merge window is over. I've tagged and
pushed out 5.10-rc1, and everything looks fairly normal.

This looks to be a bigger release than I expected, and while the merge
window is smaller than the one for 5.8 was, it's not a *lot* smaller.
And 5.8 was our biggest release ever.

I'm not entirely sure whether this is just a general upward trend (we
did seem to plateau for a while there), or just a fluke, or perhaps
due to 5.9 dragging out an extra week. We will see, I guess.

That said, things seem to have gone fairly smoothly. I don't see any
huge red flags, and the merge window didn't cause any unusual issues
for me. Famous last words..

The most interesting - to me - change here is Christoph's setf_fs()
removal (it got merged through Al Viro, as you can see in my mergelog
below).  It's not a _huge_ change, but it's interesting because the
whole model of set_fs() to specify whether a userspace copy actually
goes to user space or kernel space goes back to pretty much the
original release of Linux, and while the name is entirely historic (it
hasn't used the %fs segment register in a long time), the concept has
remained. Until now.

We still do have "set_fs()" around, and not every architecture has
been converted to the new world order, but x86, powerpc, s390 and
RISC-V have had the address space overrides removed, and all the core
work is done. Other architectures will hopefully get converted away
from that very historic model too, but it might take a while to get
rid of it all.

Anyway, to most people that all shouldn't matter at all, and it's
mainly a small historical footnote that 5.10 no longer relies on the
whole set_fs() model. Most of the actual changes are - as usual -
driver updates, but there are changes all over. I think the merge log
below gives some kind of flavor of what's been going on on a high
level, but if you're interested in the details go look at the git
tree. As mentioned, it's a big merge window, with  almost 14k commits
(*) by closer to 1700 people.

Please go test,

                  Linus

(*) closer to 15k commits if you count merges.
Read more Also: Linux 5.10-rc1 Released With New Hardware Support, Security Additions

today's leftovers

  • Mike Hoye: Navigational Instruments

    A decade ago I got to sit in on a talk by one of the designers of Microsoft Office who’d worked on the transition to the new Ribbon user interface. There was a lot to learn there, but the most interesting thing was when he explained the core rationale for the redesign: of the top ten new feature requests for Office, every year, six to eight of them were already features built into the product, and had been for at least one previous version. They’d already built all this stuff people kept saying they wanted, and nobody could find it to use it. It comes up periodically at my job that we have the same problem; there are so many useful features in Firefox that approximately nobody knows about, even people who’ve been using the browser every day and soaking in the codebase for years. People who work here still find themselves saying “wait, you can do that?” when a colleague shows them some novel feature or way to get around the browser that hasn’t seen a lot of daylight. In the hopes of putting this particular peeve to bed, I did a casual survey the other day of people’s favorite examples of underknown or underappreciated features in the product, and I’ve collected a bunch of them here. These aren’t Add-ons, as great as they are; this is what you get from Firefox out of the proverbial box. I’m going to say “Alt” and “Ctrl” a lot here, because I live in PC land, but if you’re on a Mac those are “Option” and “Command” respectively. Starting at the top, one of the biggest differences between Firefox and basically everything else out there is right there at the top of the window, the address bar that we call the Quantumbar.

  • FFQueue – SparkyLinux

    There is a new application available for Sparkers: FFQueue

  • How to install the PurpIE Gnome Shell theme on Linux

    PurpIE (AKA Rounded-Rectangle-Purple) is a Gnome Shell theme that turns your Gnome desktop from the basic black/grey/blue colors to a refreshing purple. In this guide, we’ll show you how to install PurpIE and set it up as the default theme.

Programming: Cutelyst, C/C++, Perl and Python

  • Cutelyst 2.13 and ASql 0.19 released – Dantti's Blog

    Cutelyst the C++/Qt Web Framework and ASql the ASync SQL library for Qt applications got new versions. Thanks to the work on ASql Cutelyst got some significant performance improvements on async requests, as well as a new class called ASync, which automatically detaches the current request from the processing chain, and attaches later on when it goes out of scope. With the ASync class you capture it on your ASql lambda and once the query result arrives and the lambda is freed and the ASync object gets out of scope and continues the processing action chain.

  • LLVM Lands Very Basic Support For AMD Zen 3 CPUs

    While AMD has landed Znver3 support in GNU Binutils, the company hasn't yet sent out patches for either the GCC or LLVM/Clang compilers in setting up the Zen 3 target with its new instructions or optimized scheduling model / cost table. But a basic implementation has been merged to LLVM for allowing "-march=znver3" based on the limited public details thus far. Merged to mainline LLVM 12 yesterday was a basic implementation allowing for -march=znver3 targeting that basically flips on the new instructions known to be supported by Zen 3. Beyond Zen 2, it flips on INVPCID, PKU, VAES, and VPCLMULQDQ. There are also a few other instructions supported by Zen 3 as outlined in this earlier article.

  • CY's Take on PWC#083 | Moments on Perl or other Programming Issues [blogs.perl.org]

    I found that I use "and/or" quite frequently in writing. I know, (mathematical-)logically we only need "or". It seems to me to be a language tricky part as the use of gender neutral terms.

  • Warning about Python3 update in latest -current | Alien Pastures

    Warning for people running Slackware-current and have 3rd party packages installed (who doesn’t) that depend on Python3. That includes you who are running KDE Plasma5! The “Sun Oct 25 18:05:51 UTC 2020” update in Slackware-current comes with a bump in the Python3 version (to 3.9) which is incompatible with software which already has been compiled against an older version of Python3 (like 3.8). I found 26 of my own packages on my laptop that depend on Python3 and they are all probably going to break when upgrading to the latest slackware-current. This includes Plasma5 ‘ktown’ packages but also several of my DAW packages.