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SUSE

SUSE: Eirini, Stratos Project and Cloud Foundry/Kubernetes

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SUSE
  • Paving the Road to Eirini

    At the recent Cloud Foundry Summit EU in the Netherlands, Lucas Bickel of Adfinis SyGroup and Peter Andersson of SUSE presented insight about their Cloud Foundry deployment using SUSE Cloud Application Platform for a large Swiss government office. They explained the challenges faced, the lessons learned and why SUSE Cloud Application Platform is the perfect fit to solve the customer requirements in a highly complex and demanding environment. Warning: this talk contains buzzwords such as DevOps, Cloud Native, Kubernetes, CI/CD pipeline, and other fancy stuff.

  • Stratos Project Update: The Future of the Stratos Management UI

    At the recent Cloud Foundry Summit EU in the Netherlands, Neil MacDougall and Richard Cox of SUSE presented a talk that reviewed the development of the Stratos Web-based Management UI for Cloud Foundry. They also summarized and demonstrated the new features and improvements that have been added recently. Next, they looked forward to the year ahead and discussed where we we are heading with new work on Extensions and the new features that are planned.

  • Lightning Talk: The Latest on How SUSE is Bringing Cloud Foundry and Kubernetes Together

    At the recent Cloud Foundry Summit EU in the Netherlands, Ignacio Gomez of SUSE presented a brief lightning talk explaining how SUSE continues to combine the best of the two leading open source application platforms in the industry — Cloud Foundry and Kubernetes. Through projects like Quarks, Eirini, and Stratos, SUSE is fusing the mature development model of Cloud Foundry with the advanced container scheduling capabilities of Kubernetes.

Events: GUADEC, LibreOffice Conference, SUSE in TechEd and LibrePlanet

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GNU
LibO
GNOME
SUSE
  • GUADEC 2019 | Part 1: Passing the Baton

    This year, GUADEC was held in Thessaloniki, Greece from August 23rd – 28th. I had a great time at the conference and took some time to travel after, so I was able to see some of Northern Greece, in addition to hanging out with some of the best people I know while at GUADEC.

    Since there’s a lot of talk about, I’ll be doing two separate posts, one about the Board meeting (in this post), and one about the conference itself (next post).

  • LibreOffice monthly recap: September 2019

    Here’s our summary of updates, events and activities in the LibreOffice project in the last four weeks – click the links to learn more!

    The biggest event in September was the LibreOffice Conference 2019 which took place in Almeria, Spain. Over 100 people from across the globe met up to discuss current developments in LibreOffice, make plans for the future, and have fun. 

  • Hola Barcelona! – SUSE @ TechEd – All You Need to Know

    Hola! SUSE will be exhibiting at TechEd Barcelona 2019. As it was always a great event in the past I am already looking forward to be in Barcelona again. This year we have a great set of video based demos about new features and capabilities available on our booth. Lee Martin and Fabian Herschel (myself) will also present the features also during our lecture. Reserve the date! Our lecture will take place at Wednesday, October 8th from 9:15-10:15 am in room L11. Get a great overview of all you need to know in our session which has the number CAA139. All you need to know – find us in the SAP TechEd Barcelona session catalog.

  • FSF Blogs: Submit a session proposal for LibrePlanet 2020 conference: Free the Future by Nov. 20

    The Free Software Foundation (FSF) invites activists, hackers, law professionals, artists, students, developers, young people, policymakers, tinkerers, newcomers to free software, and anyone looking for technology that aligns with their ideals, to submit a proposal for a session at our twelfth annual social justice and technology LibrePlanet conference. Potential talks should examine free software through the lens of this year's theme, and can focus on software development, copyleft, community, or other related issues.

    Submissions to the call for sessions are being accepted through Wednesday, November 20, 2019 at 12:00pm Eastern Standard time (17:00 UTC).

    Over the last decade, LibrePlanet has blossomed from a small gathering of FSF members into a vibrant multi-day event that attracts a broad audience of anyone interested in the values of software freedom. LibrePlanet 2019 had almost a thousand people participate around the world, both online and in-person, for workshops and talks centered around the theme of "Trailblazing Free Software." To stay up to date about everything LibrePlanet 2020, visit https://www.libreplanet.org/2020.

openSUSE News: Election Committee Set to Open Vote on Project Name

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SUSE

Following discussions about the “openSUSE Project logo & name change” that started in June on the openSUSE Project mailing list [1], the Election Committee received a request from the Board to conduct a vote whereby openSUSE members can indicate whether they are for or against the project name change.

The voting will start on Oct. 10 and end on Oct. 31, which will provide three weeks for members to vote. The result will be announced on Nov. 1.

The voting exercise is limited to openSUSE members only.

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Acer AspireOne D255 with openSUSE Tumbleweed Xfce

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
SUSE

Anytime someone wants to give me a piece of hardware, it’s hard for me to say, “no.” I received this Acer AspireOne D255 as payment for installing openSUSE Leap on an HP Laptop. This little netbook was a bit slower than my other Acer AspireOne and with only 1 GiB of RAM and a dead battery. I tried to see if I could install anything but the hard drive was at it’s end of life. So, thing sat in a drawer for about a year or so. I found that there are some education open source programs that are quite educational and since I would rather my kids not play games on phones and tablets, now was the time for me to act.

I purchased a new battery and a charger for this computer which cost me all of $21. I ordered a 2 GiB stick of DDR3 memory so that whenever it did arrive, I could upgrade that as well.

Taking apart the AspireOne is not that difficult, at all, you just have to know how to get to the screws to drop the back panel. Annoyingly, you have to remove the keyboard by essentially pushing back little detents to pop the thing out. It isn’t exactly work made for large hands.

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Tumbleweed Snapshots Trending High with Bash, PulseAudio, Curl Updates

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SUSE

Three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots released this week brought about two dozen new versions of software.

The snapshots brought one new major version update for pulseaudio and an updated version of bash.

The major version update to pulseaudio 13.0 came in Snapshot 20190921. The sound server program improved the initial card profile selection for Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA) cards and improved the play 5.1 surround audio that now treats both “side” or “rear” channels identically when the user has a 5.1 speaker setup; the 7.1 setup still has a difference which channel pair gets used. The libreoffice 6.3.2.2 package had some stability tweaks and addressed two Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE), which one had an unsafe URL assembly flaw. The cabextract program that un-archives files in the Microsoft cabinet file format modernized the spec file in its 1.9.1 version. Another package updated in the snapshot was osinfo-db, which is a package that provides a database of information about operating systems for virtualization provisioning tools. The snapshot is trending at a stable rating of 95, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

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SUSE: Persistent Storage for Containers, Stratos and Kubernetes

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SUSE
  • Persistent Storage for Containers: Why the Future is Open Source

    Software containerization is unlikely to be at the top of the list of considerations for the average storage administrator. First and foremost storage professionals are going to be concerned with every enterprise’s most pressing problem: managing the ‘explosive’ volume of data within the constraints of their limited IT budget.

    However, there are compelling reasons why storage professionals should be thinking about containerization as how its rapid adoption will impact the roadmap of your existing storage providers and drive changes to your own organization’s data storage strategy.

  • Multi-cloud Management: Stratos and Kubernetes

    At the recent Cloud Foundry Summit EU in the Netherlands, Troy Topnik and Neil MacDougall of SUSE demonstrated and talked about the work that SUSE has done to extend the Stratos management interface to include support for Kubernetes and Helm. They described how they used the Stratos extension mechanism to add new endpoint types for Kubernetes and Helm and showed some of the features that SUSE has been developing. They talked about where SUSE is headed next in extending Stratos beyond Cloud Foundry into a Multi-cloud Management interface.

Bye Bye Bento, Hello Bootstrap!

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GNU
Linux
SUSE

This is probably the last post related to revamping our user interface (UI).

This is part 8 of a series of posts about revamping the user interface of OBS. We started off with the Package pages in October 2018, moved on to the Project, User and Group pages in December 2018, continued with the Request pages in February 2019 and migrated the Configuration pages in March 2019. We then finished the Maintenance pages in April 2019, the Search and Kiwi Editor pages were completed in May 2019. In June 2019 we focused on the Cloud and Monitor pages. The whole migration was finished in September 2019, bye bye bento!.

After almost one year of work, we systematically updated to a new technology stack, simplified a lot of code and brought the interface over from 2006 to 2019.

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Reasons why openSUSE is Fantabulous in 2019

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SUSE

Not long ago, I was in the openSUSE Discord off topic chat room… or channel… whatever the terminology is, and the reasons for using openSUSE came up because someone needed a reminder. It was probably more tongue and cheek than anything but it is good, from time to time, to reflect on your decisions and ask yourself whether or not those decisions are still correct.

After doing a little reflection as to why I use openSUSE, what is its unique selling feature, I would say there are multiple and those reasons likely change in rank based on your particular use case. For me it is the combination of the tools plus a few herbs and spices that provide to me a reliable and stable base upon which I can rely which enables me to learn, experiment and potentially break it with mutliple fail safe features to easily restore it to a pre-fiddling stage. I get freedom to fiddle with openSUSE without the catastrophic consequences of breaking it. It is quite literally everything I want out of a computer operating system.

Here are some of the featurs I think make it “Fantabulous”, today, in 2019.

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SUSE and Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Skuba on SUSE CaaS Platform 4

    With SUSE CaaS Platform 4 we heard our customers feedback and decided to change what the lifecycle of the platform looks like.

    Previous versions of SUSE CaaS Platform included an administrator node that despite being useful for managing the whole platform, was another component to take care of, and an extra machine to take into account when deploying the platform.

    This administrator node used Salt to set up and maintain the Kubernetes cluster among the different nodes comprising your cluster.

    During this time, your feedback has been that a little more flexibility on the deployment was appreciated, so you could experiment with slightly different setups, even if they were for proof of concepts while you were fleshing out the details of production clusters.

  • Kubernetes Rolling Update Strategy in our production infra

    Kubernetes rolling update strategy means suppose we are running pod (containers) in our live infra and we want to update new changes into our running pod like build update, confrontational changes etc. While deployment new pod with new changes suppose our containers got stuck or failed due to any reason.

    So, we have to redeploy old pod with old changes again to avoid downtime of our application. This complete process is called rolling update strategy in Kubernetes.

    Kubernetes rolling update strategy

    Before moving to next we should aware about new pod deployment strategy of Kubernetes means how many new pods it will deploy at a time without taking downtime. Because high availability of our website is our first priority. So, while deploying new pod Kubernetes will deploy 25% or you can say one fourth of the total pod. Suppose we are running four pods first it will terminate 25% of total pod means one pod. Then it will launch 25% new pod and so on.

  • Tackle OpenStack networking woes with SUSE OpenStack Cloud Crowbar

    By far, the most difficult aspect of successfully deploying OpenStack is getting the networking right, a challenge that has caused many a well-intentioned IT team to throw up its hands and toss in the towel. Fortunately, SUSE OpenStack Cloud removes much of that pain by automating most of the network deployment and dramatically simplifying custom network set-ups.

  • Grow your virtualization environments without breaking the bank

    An IT director at a large financial services company shares the benefits and cost reductions they’ve experienced by switching to Red Hat Virtualization. In just three years, it’s paved the way for an efficient, stable and cost-effective virtualization environment.

  • How to Handle OpenShift Worker Nodes Resources in Overcommitted State

    One of the benefits in adopting a system like OpenShift is facilitating burstable and scalable workload. Horizontal application scaling involves adding or removing instances of an application to match demand. When OpenShift schedules a Pod, it’s important that the nodes have enough resources to actually run it. If a user schedules a large application (in the form of Pod) on a node with limited resources , it is possible for the node to run out of memory or CPU resources and for things to stop working!

    It’s also possible for applications to take up more resources than they should. This could be caused by a team spinning up more replicas than they need to artificially decrease latency or simply because of a configuration change that causes a program to go out of control and try to use 100% of the available CPU resources. Regardless of whether the issue is caused by a bad developer, bad code, or bad luck, what’s important is how a cluster administrator can manage and maintain control of the resources.

    In this blog, let’s take a look at how you can solve these problems using best practices.

  • How the new Quarkus extension for Visual Studio Code improves the development experience

    Earlier this year, we were introduced to Quarkus, the next-generation, container-first framework for Java applications. As expected, such new frameworks and technologies make way for new developer tools focused on making the development experience even better.

    The recent Quarkus extension for Visual Studio Code release aims to do just that, by bringing features specific to Quarkus project development within VS Code. The new VS Code extension is dependent on a couple of Java extensions for VS Code, so it is recommended that you have the Java Extension Pack installed. This article outlines what the Quarkus extension for VS Code has to offer: convenient features for an already convenient Java framework.

Firefox, Graphene, Krita update in Tumbleweed

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SUSE

Two openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released this week.

The snapshots furnished the update for KDE Applications 19.08.1 and updated several libraries including Intel’s Graphene library OS.

Snapshot 20190917 delivered four packages. The Graphene package updated to 1.10.0 and now uses an ancillary library called (micro) µTest for its test suite, which makes possible to build and run the test suite without depending on GLib. Mozilla Firefox 69.0 provided Enhanced Tracking Protection (ETP) with stronger privacy protections and added support for receiving multiple video codecs to makes it easier for WebRTC conferencing services to mix video from different clients. The other two package updates in the snapshot were icecream 1.3, which takes compile jobs from a build and distributes it among remote machines allowing a parallel build, and the HTTP client/server library for GNOME libsoup 2.66.3. The update of icecream 1.3 improved the speed of creating compiler tarballs. The snapshot is trending at a moderately stable rating of 87, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

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More in Tux Machines

Intel’s 5G-oriented Atom P5900 features up to 24 10nm Tremont cores

Like the C3000, the P5900 supports up to 128GB DDR4, now at up to 2933 MT/s. It similarly supports 16x PCIe 3.0, 16x SATA 3.0, 4x USB 3.0, and 4x USB 2.0 interfaces. However, the SATA links can now be reconfigured as up to 16x PCIe 2.0 or 16x USB 3.0, so you can now have up to 32x PCIe lanes. Other features include GPIO, 3x UARTs, and -40 to 85°C support. We saw no mention of OS support, but we imagine that like the Atom C3000, the Atom P5900 is primarily designed to run Linux. The C3000 has appeared on a variety of Linux-powered networking appliances such as Advantech’s FWA-1012VC, as well as numerous COM Express Type 7 modules like Avnet/MSC’s MSC C7B-DV. Earlier this month, it showed up on a Versalogic Grizzly SBC. Read more

Games: Ultimate Chicken Horse, Dota Underlords, Overclocking With GreenWithEnvy

  • Hilarious party-platformer 'Ultimate Chicken Horse' free update due next month

    Ultimate Chicken Horse, a party-platform where you build the platforms as you go is getting a sweet free update with some new toys to play with next month. A game you absolutely need to play too! After only just getting into it myself thanks to the Humble Sweet Farm Bundle last month, it was pretty hilarious to try. Clever Endeavour Games have now announced the "A·cobra·tic Update" which is due out on March 12, for all platforms and it's free. It's going to include a new Snake character (who rides a Skateboard), two new levels and four new blocks. Along with "a handful of improvements, minor additions to the game, and plenty of bug fixes". The new blocks flamethrower, one-way gate, cannon and beehive sound like they will be fun to screw with others.

  • Dota Underlords from Valve is out with the City Crawl campaign mode

    Valve's latest game, Dota Underlords, has today left Early Access and with it comes a huge patch full of new content and features. The biggest addition to the Underlords strategy game is the City Crawl campaign. A single-player mode, that explains a bit about what's going on. It seems "Mama Eeb" passed away, leaving a power vacuum in White Spire, with the four Underlords attempting to take control. City Crawl is where you do that, as you go through various different types of challenges and while doing so earn new outfits for the Underlords.

  • Linux Gaming: Overclock your Nvidia GPU on Linux with GreenWithEnvy

    Overclocking your Nvidia card on Linux used to be a nightmare. There was lots of different commands you had to type into the terminal, and there was no easy way to monitor your temperature and fan speeds. Thanks to Roberto Leinardi’s program GreenWithEnvy, you can now overclock with a simple, clean GUI.

Programming: AWK and Python

  • The easy-going syntax of AWK commands

    An endearing feature of AWK is the flexibility of its syntax. Some other languages have very strict rules about how to write commands, and if you disobey the rules, you get error messages.

  • Easily Clip/Split Large Videos With this Python Script

    Sometimes you have may have a large video file, and you want to split that video into many smaller videos with start and end times that you specify yourself. And of course, you don’t want to do it manually with a video editor because it’s gonna take forever. What we are talking about for example, is when you have a video of 10 minutes, and you want to create 3 smaller clips out of it such that the first one is between 1:20 and 2:20 for example, and the second one is between 3:00 and 4:00 and the last one is between 7:10 and 8:15. Such things is theoretically hard, but not with Python and its amazing tools!

  • Real Python: How to Work With a PDF in Python

    The Portable Document Format or PDF is a file format that can be used to present and exchange documents reliably across operating systems. While the PDF was originally invented by Adobe, it is now an open standard that is maintained by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). You can work with a preexisting PDF in Python by using the PyPDF2 package.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #409 (Feb. 25, 2020)

Linux (Kernel): Clear Linux, AMD Radeon Graphics and Raspberry Pi 4

  • One Of Clear Linux's Kernel Patches To Help With Boot Time Proposed For Upstreaming

    Besides Clear Linux delivering often leading x86_64 Linux performance at run-time, when it comes to boot performance it has also been at the forefront -- in some configurations, can boot in 300 ms. Intel has invested significantly in ensuring Clear Linux boots as fast as possible for when running in the cloud or on containers in order to respond to increased demand as quickly as possible as well as for use-cases like Clear Linux within automobiles where they need to get automobile cameras active within two seconds of power on. One of their many kernel patches could be on its way to the mainline kernel.

  • Running The Linux 5.6 Kernel With AMD Radeon Graphics

    Now hitting about mid-way through the Linux 5.6 kernel with early fallout having been addressed, we've been ramping up our testing/benchmarking of this next major kernel release. Here is our initial experience with the AMDGPU driver on Linux 5.6. Linux 5.6 brings many new features As it concerns the AMDGPU kernel driver, there is reset support for Renoir and Navi, initial bring-up for AMD Pollock, HDCP 2.x support, the kernel bits for Vulkan timeline semaphore support, DP MST DSC compression, and other fixes and code improvements.

  • VC4 DRM Driver Gets Patched For BCM2711 / Raspberry Pi 4 Support

    While the Linux 5.5 kernel landed Broadcom BCM2711 SoC and Raspberry Pi 4 enablement, one of the loose ends has been getting the open-source "VC4" DRM driver wired up for the display hardware on this latest Raspberry Pi. Patches are now pending for VC4 DRM to provide that display support and could potentially see it mainlined for Linux 5.7.