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SUSE

KDE Partition Manager on openSUSE

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SUSE

I have become quite the fan of Gparted over the years of my Linux life and I started wondering if there were other partition management options out there. Specifically one that is Qt based instead. This is not a light on GTK based applications, I just find that they don’t tend to look as nice and clean as Qt apps. In this off-hand search, I stumbled upon PartitionManger which is in official openSUSE Tumbleweed and Leap Repositories.

I should note, they both Gparted and KDE Partition Manager use the same icon.

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Also: Help promote openSUSE Leap "15.2"!

KDE Plasma 5.19 on openSUSE Tumbleweed

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SUSE

It was not so long ago that Plasma 5.18 graced my computer and very excitingly, 5.19 is here now. Since Tumbleweed is my main Linux system I use, I decided to share my experience on openSUSE Tumbleweed but it should be noted that you can enjoy Plasma 5.19 on Leap as well using the backports repositories. Leap is not my preferred method but it is an option.

Bottom Line Up Front: It is another fantastic release with much attention being made to the finer details that enhance the usability experience without taking away from any of its functionality.

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UbuntuDDE | Review from an openSUSE User

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Reviews
SUSE
Ubuntu

UbuntuDDE is a satisfactory Desktop Environment. Would I say it is the most beautiful? No, not a chance. I think it is fine though. What bothers me most about it is the very limiting feeling I get from it. I don’t feel attached to the desktop. I don’t feel like it is mine and things like not all applications respecting the dark theme just added more to that pile.

Despite my experience with the desktop. I think you should give it a try, in a VM or on actual hardware. After all, your experience may be far different than mine. It could be all roses and puppy dogs or maybe Kawaii cats hiding and appearing. After all, I am a biased openSUSE Plasma user that wants his bacon fried to a certain perfection. My tastes are different than yours so you should explore and find your Desktop Home.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed on an HP Zbook 15 G2 with Nvidia Quadro K2100M

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SUSE

Outside of the Nvidia issue, which I may have eventually worked out if I had the time or the inclination, openSUSE Tumbleweed with the Plasma desktop was a nice experience. At least, far nicer than the Windows 7 experience and now that I am thinking of it. The graphics drivers on Windows were wonkey too. I often had to reboot the machine to clear things up. So, it is possible there may be something not quite right with the hardware. It is also possible the keyboard may have been abused before I obtained it so that might account for the poor keyboard performance too.

If I had more time, I would have probably tried a few more distros on it. Leap being one and Pop_!OS being the other. Just to see if the Nvidia issue was a hardware thing. Would I ever buy this machine for myself? Nope. Lots of little things I don’t like about it, really. I would call it an “almost” machine. Everything about it is almost great but just happens to fall short in a lot of areas.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/24

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SUSE

Another week has passed. There have been a few technical issues around the publishing of our snapshots. Two were flagged for release, but actually never made it to the mirrors. Turned out, kiwi renamed some of the live-images from *-i686-* to *-ix86-*. But nothing else knew about it. As we even have links on the web pointing to those image names, we opted to revert to the original name. So, due to this, we only release 3 snapshots (0604, 0609, and 0610; 0609 contained the changes of 0605 and 0607 – the ones that got not synced out).

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SUSE: Clown Computing, GNU/Linux Promotion and YaST Development Sprint 101

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SUSE
  • SUSE High Availability on GCP – New Foundational Stack

    When it comes to the SUSE High Availability Extension (HAE) implementation in the Public Cloud, the two challenges we have are related to how to implement the Fencing Agent and the Floating IP resource agent functions. Each Cloud Service Provider (CSP) has its own way to implement that, which is different than the on-premises SUSE HAE implementation.

  • The rise of Linux popularity

    Kathy Gibson reports from a SUSE/SAB&T TEC webinar – Linux is seeing a huge surge in popularity – which is not surprising when you consider the various features offered by the operating system.
    Tinus Brink, director of consulting at SAB&T TEC, points out that Linux is free, which is a good part of the reason for its popularity.

    It is also open source by nature and the source code can be changed to fit your needs.

  • Moving to Linux is easier than you think

    Among the enhancements that have been made to the operating system of late are more user friendly user interfaces.
    The Gnome interface is native to Linux, Brink points out. “It is easy to use and quick.”
    If users want to use other interfaces, they can install multiple themes for front-end computers using KDE, LXQt, XFCE and others that emulate a Windows operating system.
    Deepin, Pantheon and Budgie can be downloaded to run a MacOS-like front-end.

  • Digest of YaST Development Sprint 101

    As explained in our previous blog post, this YaST development report is presented as a collection of links to rather descriptive Github’s pull requests. With that, our readers can deep into the particular topics they find interesting.

SUSE Condemns US Government and Promotes SUSE Enterprise Storage 7

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SUSE
  • A time of reflection and standing together

    Like many of you, I have found the events occurring across the United States in response to the unconscionable killings of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor, amongst many others, to be profoundly tragic and painful. Personally, they have shaken me to my core and have left me in deep reflection. While I will never understand the struggle of millions of people around the world that have been subject to systemic oppression, I stand united against hate and discrimination.
    As these events continue to unfold across the United States, they have rightly grabbed the world’s attention, and as leader of a global company, SUSE cannot remain silent – we will not remain silent. We will not accept racism, discrimination, or harassment in any form at any time. We stand against the innocent lives lost.

  • Staying Out of Trouble with SUSE Enterprise Storage 7

    Do you ever wake up in the morning and think, “I wish there was somewhere that stored common troubleshooting problems for SUSE Enterprise Storage 7?”

SUSE: Mainframe at Home, INNOVATORS Project and YaST Development Sprints 99 and 100

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SUSE
  • Developing Software for Linux on Mainframe at Home

    When developing for architectures that are not mainstream, developers often have challenges to get access to current systems that allow to work on a specific software. Especially when asking to fix an issue that shows up only on big endian hardware, the answer I repeatedly get is, that it’s hard to get access to an appropriate machine.

    I just recently saw reports that told that the qemu project made substantial progress with supporting more current Mainframe hardware. Thus I thought, how hard could it be to create a virtual machine that allows to develop for s390x on local workstation hardware.

    It turned out to be much easier than I thought. First, I did a standard install of tumbleweed for s390x, which went quite easy. But then I remembered that also the OBS supports emulators, and specifically qemu to run virtual machines.

  • openSUSE for INNOVATORS Project is born

    It is with great enthusiasm that I announce the INNOVATORS for openSUSE project, is an initiative to share projects, articles and news about innovative projects on the openSUSE platform developed by the community and public and private companies.

    All information on this wiki is related to innovative projects that use augmented reality technology, artificial intelligence, computer vision, robotics, virtual assistants and any and all innovative technology (in all hardware plataforms ).

  • Highlights of YaST Development Sprints 99 and 100

    One hundred development sprints, that’s a nice rounded number… and a good moment to rethink the way we write and publish our reports.

    Yes, you read it right. This post will be the last one following our traditional format, assuming something can already be called “traditional” after four and a half years. As we will explain at the end of this post, subsequent reports will look more as a digest with links to information and not that much as a traditional blog post that tries to tell a story.

Maintaining SUSE Linux support during the pandemic

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SUSE

The global pandemic and resulting government shelter-in-place or quarantine measures to limit the spread of the COVID-19 virus have shifted the priorities of IT organizations away from non-critical maintenance and upgrades. Unfortunately, the planned end of General Support date for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) 12 Service Pack 4 happens to be in the middle of this crisis. At SUSE, we understand the strain the current environment is putting on your IT operations so we have an option to help you keep your systems supported and secure.
General Support for SLES 12 SP4 ends on June 30, 2020. Normally, organizations would either upgrade to a SLES service pack/version that still has full support or purchase up to 3 years of Long Term Service Pack Support (LTSS). Available today, organizations with current subscriptions of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 SP4 are eligible to receive continued access to patches and updates in the LTSS repositories free of charge for 3 months starting July 1, 2020, through September 30, 2020. Platforms included in this offer are x86-64 and IBM Z/LinuxOne. This gives IT teams more time to complete upgrade plans and evaluations at a time when staffing is limited and the focus is on keeping the business operational.

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openSUSE Leap "15.2" Enters Release Candidate Phase

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SUSE

The openSUSE community, contributors and release engineers for the project have entered into the release candidate phase today after the Build “665.2” snapshot was released for the upcoming openSUSE Leap “15.2” version.

In an email to the openSUSE Factory mailing list, Leap release manager Lubos Kocman recommended Beta and RC users using the “zypper dup” command in the terminal prior switching to the General Availability (GA).

The release candidate signals the package freeze for software that will make it into the distribution. Among some of the packages that are expected in the release are KDE’s Plasma “5.18” Long-Term-Support version, GNOME “3.34” and Xfce “4.14”. New package for Artificial Intelligence and data scientist will be in the release. The release will also contain the tiling Wayland compositor Sway, which is a drop-in replacement for the i3 window manager for X”11”. The DNF package manager has been rebased to version “4.2.19”, which brings many fixes and improvements. In addition, a lightweight C implementation of DNF called “Micro DNF” is now included. Pagure, which provides an easy, customizable, lightweight solution for setting up your own full-featured Git repository server, has been updated to version “5.10.0”. A list of some of the packages in Leap “15.2” can be found on the openSUSE Wiki.

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More in Tux Machines

Review: Peppermint OS 10

Peppermint is one of those delightful distributions which does what it says it will do. It sets out to be lightweight, easy to set up, and offer native-like access to web applications. It does all of these things and does them well. I also happen to really like the well-organized settings panel and the friendly software manager. I especially like how mintInstall makes it clear when it is working with Deb or Flatpak packages. While I'm not personally a fan of web applications, I do think Peppermint deserves full credit for making them as easy to use as possible and as native-like as it does. I may never like running my applications over the web, but for people who do like this approach, Peppermint's Ice and SSB features are excellent. Mostly though I'm a big fan of the distribution's combined LXDE/Xfce desktop. It is a mixture of components which works nicely, is fairly easy to configure, and it offers some of the best performance I have had with an open source desktop this year. There are some rough edges. The system installer threw out some errors towards the end of the setup process. Needing to logout and back in to see Flatpaks in the application menu was a pain, but not a deal breaker. On the whole I think Peppermint does a good job of feeling modern while offering good performance and easy to use tools. Read more

Linux 5.10-rc1

Two weeks have passed, and the merge window is over. I've tagged and
pushed out 5.10-rc1, and everything looks fairly normal.

This looks to be a bigger release than I expected, and while the merge
window is smaller than the one for 5.8 was, it's not a *lot* smaller.
And 5.8 was our biggest release ever.

I'm not entirely sure whether this is just a general upward trend (we
did seem to plateau for a while there), or just a fluke, or perhaps
due to 5.9 dragging out an extra week. We will see, I guess.

That said, things seem to have gone fairly smoothly. I don't see any
huge red flags, and the merge window didn't cause any unusual issues
for me. Famous last words..

The most interesting - to me - change here is Christoph's setf_fs()
removal (it got merged through Al Viro, as you can see in my mergelog
below).  It's not a _huge_ change, but it's interesting because the
whole model of set_fs() to specify whether a userspace copy actually
goes to user space or kernel space goes back to pretty much the
original release of Linux, and while the name is entirely historic (it
hasn't used the %fs segment register in a long time), the concept has
remained. Until now.

We still do have "set_fs()" around, and not every architecture has
been converted to the new world order, but x86, powerpc, s390 and
RISC-V have had the address space overrides removed, and all the core
work is done. Other architectures will hopefully get converted away
from that very historic model too, but it might take a while to get
rid of it all.

Anyway, to most people that all shouldn't matter at all, and it's
mainly a small historical footnote that 5.10 no longer relies on the
whole set_fs() model. Most of the actual changes are - as usual -
driver updates, but there are changes all over. I think the merge log
below gives some kind of flavor of what's been going on on a high
level, but if you're interested in the details go look at the git
tree. As mentioned, it's a big merge window, with  almost 14k commits
(*) by closer to 1700 people.

Please go test,

                  Linus

(*) closer to 15k commits if you count merges.
Read more Also: Linux 5.10-rc1 Released With New Hardware Support, Security Additions

today's leftovers

  • Mike Hoye: Navigational Instruments

    A decade ago I got to sit in on a talk by one of the designers of Microsoft Office who’d worked on the transition to the new Ribbon user interface. There was a lot to learn there, but the most interesting thing was when he explained the core rationale for the redesign: of the top ten new feature requests for Office, every year, six to eight of them were already features built into the product, and had been for at least one previous version. They’d already built all this stuff people kept saying they wanted, and nobody could find it to use it. It comes up periodically at my job that we have the same problem; there are so many useful features in Firefox that approximately nobody knows about, even people who’ve been using the browser every day and soaking in the codebase for years. People who work here still find themselves saying “wait, you can do that?” when a colleague shows them some novel feature or way to get around the browser that hasn’t seen a lot of daylight. In the hopes of putting this particular peeve to bed, I did a casual survey the other day of people’s favorite examples of underknown or underappreciated features in the product, and I’ve collected a bunch of them here. These aren’t Add-ons, as great as they are; this is what you get from Firefox out of the proverbial box. I’m going to say “Alt” and “Ctrl” a lot here, because I live in PC land, but if you’re on a Mac those are “Option” and “Command” respectively. Starting at the top, one of the biggest differences between Firefox and basically everything else out there is right there at the top of the window, the address bar that we call the Quantumbar.

  • FFQueue – SparkyLinux

    There is a new application available for Sparkers: FFQueue

  • How to install the PurpIE Gnome Shell theme on Linux

    PurpIE (AKA Rounded-Rectangle-Purple) is a Gnome Shell theme that turns your Gnome desktop from the basic black/grey/blue colors to a refreshing purple. In this guide, we’ll show you how to install PurpIE and set it up as the default theme.

Programming: Cutelyst, C/C++, Perl and Python

  • Cutelyst 2.13 and ASql 0.19 released – Dantti's Blog

    Cutelyst the C++/Qt Web Framework and ASql the ASync SQL library for Qt applications got new versions. Thanks to the work on ASql Cutelyst got some significant performance improvements on async requests, as well as a new class called ASync, which automatically detaches the current request from the processing chain, and attaches later on when it goes out of scope. With the ASync class you capture it on your ASql lambda and once the query result arrives and the lambda is freed and the ASync object gets out of scope and continues the processing action chain.

  • LLVM Lands Very Basic Support For AMD Zen 3 CPUs

    While AMD has landed Znver3 support in GNU Binutils, the company hasn't yet sent out patches for either the GCC or LLVM/Clang compilers in setting up the Zen 3 target with its new instructions or optimized scheduling model / cost table. But a basic implementation has been merged to LLVM for allowing "-march=znver3" based on the limited public details thus far. Merged to mainline LLVM 12 yesterday was a basic implementation allowing for -march=znver3 targeting that basically flips on the new instructions known to be supported by Zen 3. Beyond Zen 2, it flips on INVPCID, PKU, VAES, and VPCLMULQDQ. There are also a few other instructions supported by Zen 3 as outlined in this earlier article.

  • CY's Take on PWC#083 | Moments on Perl or other Programming Issues [blogs.perl.org]

    I found that I use "and/or" quite frequently in writing. I know, (mathematical-)logically we only need "or". It seems to me to be a language tricky part as the use of gender neutral terms.

  • Warning about Python3 update in latest -current | Alien Pastures

    Warning for people running Slackware-current and have 3rd party packages installed (who doesn’t) that depend on Python3. That includes you who are running KDE Plasma5! The “Sun Oct 25 18:05:51 UTC 2020” update in Slackware-current comes with a bump in the Python3 version (to 3.9) which is incompatible with software which already has been compiled against an older version of Python3 (like 3.8). I found 26 of my own packages on my laptop that depend on Python3 and they are all probably going to break when upgrading to the latest slackware-current. This includes Plasma5 ‘ktown’ packages but also several of my DAW packages.