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SUSE

GNOME, LLVM, Samba, Ruby Packages Update in Tumbleweed

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GNOME
SUSE

Snapshot 20191018 provided minor updates for both Mozilla Firefox 69.0.3 and Thunderbird 68.1.2. The update to Firefox fixed a bug that prompted Yahoo mail users to download files when clicking on emails and the Thunderbird update fixed some glitches and fixed the address book import from a CSV. GNOME software updated to version 3.34,which could be the version that will come in openSUSE Leap 15.2. GNOME’s Thessaloniki release includes visual refreshes for a number of applications and the background selection settings also received a redesign, making it easier to select custom backgrounds. Developers using GNOME 3.34 will notices more data sources in Sysprof that make performance profiling of applications easier. Improvements to Builder include an integrated D-Bus inspector. Javascript bindings for GNOME were also updated with the gjs 1.58.1 version and gtk3 3.24.12 fixed a pointer offsets under X11 and Wayland. Python2 runtime support was removed with the updated of the samba 4.11.0 package; python 3.4 or later is required.

Also in the 20191018 snapshot was an update for the new programing language vala 0.46.3 that focuses on GNOME developers had multiple additions to the package. Programing language ruby 2.6.5 fixed a code injection vulnerability along with three other Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures. openSUSE’s snapper 0.8.5 package updated to allow trailing comments in configuration files. The Linux Kernel updated to 5.3.6. NetworkManager 1.18.4 improved the handling of externally added policy routing rules and for rules that are taken over after a restart of a NetworkManager service. The NetworkManager-applet 1.8.24 package added support for SAE authentication (WPA3 Personal). Fix regression fixes were made in both the 2.62.1 versions of glib2 and glib-networking; the latter also made two memory leak fixes. Other noteworthy packages that were updated in the snapshot were webkit2gtk3 2.26.1, libsoup 2.68.2, grilo 0.3.10, and dconf 0.34.0. The snapshot is trending at a stable rating of 92, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

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Openwashing by SUSE: How AWS combined with the SUSE open source mindset leads to your success

SUSE/OpenSUSE: Name Change, YaST, MicroOS and More

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SUSE
  • openSUSE project: vote on name change

    The openSUSE project informed it's members by mail to vote for a potential name change. The vote ends on 07.11.2019 at 23:59 UTC. In a Wiki article the openSUSE Board and Election Committee have gathered the most important arguments for and against a name change for all members.

  • Highlights of YaST Development Sprint 87

    As you may know, we have recently extended YaST to support additional encryption mechanisms like volatile encryption for swap devices or pervasive encryption for data volumes. You can find more details in our blog post titled "Advanced Encryption Options Land in the YaST Partitioner".

    Those encryption mechanisms offer the possibility of adjusting the sector size of the encryption layer according to the sector size of the disk. That can result in a performance boost with storage devices based on 4k blocks. To get the best of your systems, we have instructed YaST to set the sector size to 4096 bytes whenever is possible, which should improve the performance of the encrypted devices created with the recently implemented methods.

    Additionally, we took the time to improve the codebase related to encryption, based on the lessons we learned while implementing volatile and pervasive encryption. We also performed some additional tests and we found a problem that we are already fixing in the sprint that has just started.

  • toolbox - bring your own (debugging) utilities with you

    Our Container Host OS openSUSE MicroOS and our Kubernetes platform openSUSE Kubic are both using transactionl-update to apply patches to the system. This implies that a read-only root filesystem is used. While this has big advantages, like it allows to update a cluster automatically in a safe way, this has one drawback: you need to reboot to activate new installed packages. But what if you want to debug a problem and the utility you need is not installed? Who says, that the problem is still debuggable after a reboot?

  • Why software-defined storage is right for the hybrid cloud

    Beyond being an intermediate step, hybrid cloud isn’t particularly well defined. If you took a random selection of three CIOs, they’d each likely explain it differently. It’s a bit like asking three people to imagine a farmyard animal: one thinks “pig”, one thinks “hen” and the other thinks “cow”. All three are right, but all three are imagining something very different. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have given us an official hybrid cloud definition but not everyone agrees that this is that helpful. Lauren Nelson, principle analyst at Forrester, described this definition as “far from reality”. We’re at the top of the hype cycle and Nelson was making a fair point: NIST’s definition calls for active bursting from one environment into another, and while most enterprises would see themselves as hybrid, cross environment bursting is in practice nearly as rare as real unicorns.

  • A “Silly Season Blog” – Have Fun with Sapstartsrv and Pacemaker

    This blog is about a funny integration of a plain Linux service into the SAP start framework sapstartsrv and SUSEs High Availability solution based on pacemaker. This solution is not intended to run in productive environments but should demonstrate how to integrate special services.

Events: Cloud Foundry Summit, OpenSUSE Asia and FSFE System Hackers

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OSS
SUSE
  • The Importance of Culture in Software Development

    A few weeks ago at Cloud Foundry Summit, I had the chance to grab a few of our partners and talk about how culture plays a part in the software development process. While appropriate tools are very important, it is only part of the story. Culture will make or break any change initiative regardless of how amazing our technology is.

  • openSUSE Asia Summit

    I met Edwin and Ary earlier this year at the openSUSE Conference in Nuremberg. They invited me to come to the openSUSE Asia Summit happening in Bali. I wasn't sure that I would be able to attend it. But then, around June I saw a tweet reminding about the deadline for the Call for Proposal for the openSUSE Asia Summit and I thought maybe I should give it a try.

    I submitted a workshop proposal on MicroOS and a lightning talk proposal to the openSUSE Asia CFP team. Both were accepted and I couldn't be happier. It gave me the chance to meet friends from the openSUSE community again, learn and share more.

    We do not have direct flights to Indonesia. I traveled through Air Mauritius to Kuala Lumpur and then Malaysia Arlines to Denpasar, Bali. I spent almost 24 hours traveling before reaching my hotel in Jimbaran. I was totally knackered when I arrived but the enthusiasm of being there for the summit was stronger than anything.

    I booked a taxi through Traveloka ahead of my arrival in Bali. It was recommended by Edwin. When I compared other taxi fares I felt glad I booked it online. I also bought a SIM card on my way to the hotel with a 6GB data package. I knew we'd all communicate mostly on Telegram, just as we did for oSC 2019. My hotel WiFi connection wasn't great but I was impressed by the 4G coverage of my mobile Internet provider, XL Axiata. Mobile connectivity was extremely helpful as I would rely on GoJek car-hailing for the next few days.

  • The 3rd FSFE System Hackers hackathon

    On 10 and 11 October, the FSFE System Hackers met in person to tackle problems and new features regarding the servers and services the FSFE is running. The team consists of dedicated volunteers who ensure that the community and staff can work effectively. The recent meeting built on the great work of the past 2 years which have been shaped by large personal and technical changes.

    The System Hackers are responsible for the maintenance and development of a large number of services. From the fsfe.org website’s deployment to the mail servers and blogs, from Git to internal services like DNS and monitoring, all these services, virtual machines and physical servers are handled by this friendly group that is always looking forward to welcoming new members.

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • Digital Transformation – it’s dead, Jim?

    However, digital transformation is like life – it’s an ongoing process, not something you just do once and then it’s done and dusted. A large part of digital transformation is your cloud strategy, which I wrote about fairly recently. That is also something that isn’t a one-off task, but is instead an evolving, transformational process. It was interesting to see, after speaking to attendees at the Gartner event in Frankfurt, that a number of them still hadn’t defined their cloud strategy outside of “we need to move everything to the cloud for cost savings and agility”, while some hadn’t even begun writing a cloud strategy.
    Looking at a chart showing the trends in Google searches for digital transformation in the US (the global trend is the same) over the past 5 years, you can see that while it trends up and then down fairly regularly, it still continues to grow on the whole. So if it’s been around for a while, why does it continue to grow, and is it still relevant?

  • New Security Tools for Application Delivery

    What if you could shut down cybercriminals’ most frequently used method of attack? At SUSE we’ve recently made a move to help you get closer to that goal.

    As you may know, SUSE recently released new versions of our application delivery solutions, SUSE CaaS Platform 4 and SUSE Cloud Application Platform 1.5. The releases contain a number of important updates and features, but the one most exciting in terms of protecting your organization is the addition of Cilium to SUSE CaaS Platform.

SUSE/OpenSUSE: Ceph and OpenSUSE's Tumbleweed Progress

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SUSE
  • Can I deploy Ceph on older hardware?

    You just retired a bunch of servers and disk arrays, but before you place hundreds of thousands or millions of dollars’ worth of equipment on the curb, you’re wondering if you can use it for a Ceph-based storage solution like SUSE Enterprise Storage. The answer is: maybe.

    SUSE prides itself on supporting a wide range of hardware, from blades to retail terminals to IoT devices. In fact, SUSE makes it possible to easily deploy a wide range of software on that hardware and certify it will work through the SUSE YES Certification Program. SUSE Yes Certification assures your IHV equipment is fully compatible with SUSE software, including SUSE Enterprise Storage.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2019/42

    Another week has passed with again four snapshots published. This pace seems to be holding pretty solid and I think it’s not the worst speed there is. During this week, we have released the snapshots 1011, 1012, 1014 and 1016. As usual, some were smaller, some were bigger.

Events: openSUSE Asia Summit, EmacsConf and LaKademy

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GNU
KDE
SUSE
  • openSUSE Asia Summit 2019: Summit Preparation

    Actually, this journey begins in 2015. I attending Indonesia Linux Conference, that’s the first time I meet people from openSUSE Indonesia. Mr. Edwin Zakaria. I remember, he gave me Alex the Gecko T-Shirt from Babacucu.com. My first openSUSE T-shirt.

    After attending the conference. I also invited to KPLI (Kelompok Pengguna Linux Indonesia: it’s like Indonesian Linux Users) meeting at Gucci, Tegal with my boss, Pak Vavai. It’s an honor for me. Because I remember, I was a kid who never knew about a community before.

  • November 2: Save the date! EmacsConf is coming to Boston

    The Free Software Foundation (FSF) is happy to announce our office in Boston as the next official EmacsConf satellite! Join us on Saturday, November 2 for an all-day event on everyone's favorite self-documenting, customizable, and extensible editor: GNU Emacs! The FSF will join ZĂźrich, Switzerland as the second physical satellite to EmacsConf, which will be held online this year.

  • Announcing LaKademy 2019

    The seventh edition of the KDE Latin-American Summit (LaKademy 2019) is ready to go! It will take place at Salvador-Bahia, northeastern Brazil, from 14th to 17th November. 24 participants, hopefully accompanied by some local guests, will meet at Information Technology Superintendence of Federal University of Bahia for four days of hacking sessions, promo meetings, and all sort of KDE-related things.

    Salvador (the city I live in) is well known for its beatiful beaches, the biggest carnival in the planet, and its unique cuisine. In November, attendees can already have a glimpse on our warm summer and hopefully that will bring a bunch of additional energy for having a fun and productive meeting.

SUSE/OpenSUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • Plasma, Applications, Frameworks arrive in Latest Tumbleweed Snapshot

    The most recent snapshot, 20191014, updated several packages around KDE’s projects. Plasma 5.17.0 arrived in the snapshot and there are some extraordinary changes to the new version. The release announcement says this new version is as lightweight and thrifty with resources as ever before. The start-up scripts were converted from a slower Bash to a faster C++ and now run asynchronously, which means it can run several tasks simultaneously, instead of having to run them one after another. Improvements to the widget editing User Experience were made and the Night Color feature became available, which subtly changes the hue and brightness of the elements on the screen when it gets dark; this diminishes glare and makes it more relaxing to the eyes. The same snapshot brought KDE Applications 19.08.2 and the second version of the 19.08 release improved High-DPI support in Konsole and other applications; there were many bugs fixes as well and KMail can once again save messages directly to remote folders. There was more KDE packages arriving in Tumbleweed with the update of KDE Frameworks 5.63.0; KIO, Kirigami and KTextEditor had the most bug fixes in frameworks latest release. The Tumbleweed snapshot had several other software packages updated like the file system utilities package e2fsprogs 1.45.4, which addressed Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures CVE-2019-5094 where an attacker would have been able to corrupt a ext4 partition. The 3.6.10 version of gnutls added support for deterministic Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm (ECDSA) / Digital Signature Algorithm (DSA). Text editor Nano updated to version 4.5 and offers a new ‘tabgives’ command allowing users to specify per syntax whatthe key should produce. The php7 7.3.10 version modified some patches and fixed some bugs. With all these changes, the snapshot is trending at a stable rating of 95, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

  • Multi-cloud Management: Stratos and Kubernetes

    At the recent Cloud Foundry Summit EU in the Netherlands, Neil MacDougall and Troy Topnik of SUSE presented a talk demonstrating and describing the work that SUSE has done to extend the Stratos management interface to include support for Kubernetes and Helm. They talked about how SUSE has used the Stratos extension mechanism to add new endpoint types for Kubernetes and Helm and we showed some of the features that SUSE has been developing. They wrapped things up by talking about where SUSE is headed next in extending Stratos beyond Cloud Foundry into a Multi-cloud Management interface.

Kubernetes at SUSE and Red Hat

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Eirinix: Writing Extensions for Eirini

    At the recent Cloud Foundry Summit EU in the Netherlands, Vlad Iovanov and Ettore Di Giacinto of SUSE presented a talk about Eirini — a project that allows the deployment and management of applications on Kubernetes using the Cloud Foundry Platform. They introduced eirinix — a framework that allows developers to extend Eirini. Eirinix is built from the Quarks codebase, which leverages Kubernetes Mutating Webhooks. With the flexibility of Kubernetes and Eirini’s architecture, developers can now build features around Eirini, like Persi support, access to the application via SSH, ASGs via Network Policies and more. In this talk, they explained how this can be done, and how everyone can start contributing to a rich ecosystem of extensions that will improve Eirini and the developer experience of Cloud Foundry.

  • Building an open ML platform with Red Hat OpenShift and Open Data Hub Project

    Unaddressed, these challenges impact the speed, efficiency and productivity of the highly valuable data science teams. This leads to frustration, lack of job satisfaction and ultimately the promise of AI/ML to the business is not redeemed.

    IT departments are being challenged to address the above. IT has to deliver a cloud-like experience to data scientists. That means a platform that offers freedom of choice, is easy to access, is fast and agile, scales on-demand and is resilient. The use of open source technologies will prevent lockin, and maintain long term strategic leverage over cost.

    In many ways, a similar dynamic has played out in the world of application development in the past few years that has led to microservices, the hybrid cloud and automation and agile processes. And IT has addressed this with containers, kubernetes and open hybrid cloud.

    So how does IT address this challenge in the world of AI – by learning from their own experiences in the world of application development and applying to the world of AI/ML. IT addresses the challenge by building an AI platform that is container based, that helps build AI/ML services with agile process that accelerates innovation and is built with the hybrid cloud in mind.

  • Launching OpenShift/Kubernetes Support for Solarflare Cloud Onload

    This is a guest post co-written by Solarflare, a Xilinx company. Miklos Reiter is Software Development Manager at Solarflare and leads the development of Solarflare’s Cloud Onload Operator. Zvonko Kaiser is Team Lead at Red Hat and leads the development of the Node Feature Discovery operator.

Dodging derailment by SUSE, OpenStack Train is scheduled to arrive this week

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Server
OSS
SUSE

With its OpenInfrastructure summit mere weeks away, the OpenStack gang is emitting its next release in the form of "Train" with a focus on data protection and machine learning.

The release comes after foundation platinum member SUSE threw in the towel over OpenStack Cloud in order to move on to a bright, Kubernetes-based future.

Not that the "S" word was mentioned, even in a waveringly high-pitched tone, as OpenStack readied Train ahead of a release expected on 16 October.

As is the norm, OpenStack was keen to shout about the more than 25,500 accepted code changes this time around, from 1,125 developers over 150 organisations. A glance at the content of the release shows that OpenStack is as bewilderingly vast as ever, although a number of tweaks merit closer attention.

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SUSE: Highlights of OpenSUSE Asia Summit, Maintaining Enterprise Linux Kernels and More

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SUSE
  • Highlights of openSUSE Asia Summit 2019

    The openSUSE.Asia Summit is one of the big events for the openSUSE community (i.e. both contributors and users) in Asia. Those who normally communicate online can meet from all over the world, talk in person and have fun. Members of the community share their current knowledge, experience and learn FLOSS technologies around openSUSE. The openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 took place from October 5 to October 6, 2019 at the Information Technology Department, Faculty of Engineering, Udayana University, Bali.

  • Maintaining Enterprise Linux Kernels

    Forking the Linux kernel and using it as the basis of an Enterprise product is a challenging task. The pace of development in the upstream Linux kernel makes it hard to keep up with all the fixes that need to be backported. This article describes the process we use at SUSE to find and backport potentially required upstream fixes to our kernels.

    [...]

    Every fix that is reported will be evaluated by a developer and either backported to the kernel branches that need it or blacklisted, so that the fix is no longer considered. But who is the best person (or group) to report a fix to?
    The answer is easy if the fix is for a patch that was backported by someone within SUSE as part of a service pack development cycle. In that case the person who backported the patch is tasked with reviewing the associated fix. The same happens with upstream fixes that are authored or committed by a SUSE employee.
    Assigning fixes for patches that are part of the base-kernel is a bit more complicated. To that end we have introduced a maintainer model with an internal list of experts for most parts of the Linux kernel.
    The approach is similar to the MAINTAINERS file in the upstream Linux kernel, but the file at SUSE is simpler. It only contains a list of people and several path-specs per entry. Each potential fix for the base-kernel is matched against the path-specs in the maintainers list and assigned to the best matching entry. The fix is reported to the developers listed in the matching entry.
    But not all fixes could be assigned that way because the SUSE maintainers list does not cover the whole kernel source tree. For the remaining fixes a heuristic is used. It is based on which source code files in the kernel source tree are touched by the backports of each developer. This is matched against the file(s) a fix touches.

  • Suse: Equipped For The Hybrid Multicloud Age

    Linux as an operating system platform as well as other Open Source technologies as core elements are used in SAP infrastructures. This is applicable for Cloud as well as on-premises deployment. Thus, they are equipped for the Hybrid Multicloud age.
    Open Source arrived in the SAP world a long time ago. The Walldorf-based software company contributed to this development when it made the decision to only use the Linux operating system platform along with SAP Hana and Hana-based application solutions such as S/4.

    And the trend towards Linux with NetWeaver-based infrastructures with AnyDB has already provided the impetus for the deep penetration of Linux. The Hana figures quoted by SAP recently (during this year’s Sapphire conference) speak to this significance. The company now has 50,000 Hana licenses. In addition to Linux, other Open Source solutions are used in SAP environments in conjunction with Data Science and the use of Kubernetes. Kubernetes is used for the orchestration of containers as part of SAP Data Hub environments.

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Open Hardware and OSS Leftovers

  • ESP Open Source Research Platform Enables the Design of RISC-V & Sparc SoC’s with Accelerators

    FOSDEM 2020 will take place next week, and there will be several interesting talks about open-source hardware and software development.

  • Open source power for classrooms: Arduino Uno WiFi Rev2 for CTC GO! joins Open Roberta

    Dream team for classrooms worldwide: Arduino Uno WiFi Rev2 for CTC GO! joins Open Roberta Lab, the biggest open source coding platform made in Europe. The Arduino Uno WiFi Rev2 is the fourth Arduino board to be integrated into the Open Roberta Lab, which is currently supporting a total of 13 robots and microcontrollers to enable children worldwide to adopt a playful approach to coding. By “dragging and dropping” the colorful programming blocks called “NEPO” hundreds of thousands of users worldwide from more than 100 countries per year create their own programs to make their hardware come to life.

  • Boston Dynamics Robot Dog Now Freely Available to All as Open-Source Code

    Boston Dynamics‘ robot dog Spot has gone through extensive updates in order to become the finished product it is today, and now the Softbank-owned company will make the bot’s SDK available to everyone via GitHub. The release will allow developers and robotics alike to “develop custom applications that enable Spot to do useful tasks across a wide range of industries,” according to Boston Dynamics VP Michael Perry. The access was previously only open to early adopters, but now it’s available as open-source code. However, fellow developers will have to join Boston Dynamics’ early adopter program in order to lease a robot. The company says its to “create custom methods of controlling the robot, integrate sensor information into data analysis tools and design custom payloads which expand the capabilities of the base robot platform,” according to the company.

  • The programmer behind wildly popular open source project Jenkins and Atlassian Bitbucket's former head of product raised $3.2 million to speed up software testing
  • 6 Reasons Why Network Monitoring Software Should Be Open Source

    Open-source software (OSS) is built upon code that's free and available to anyone who needs it. It adheres to the Debian (Linux) free software guidelines. The only type of certification comes from the Open Source Initiative, which makes sure that coding listed as "open source" meets their criteria by a) Being available for distribution to anyone without any restrictions, b) Making sure the source code is available, and c) Including a license that stipulates that any modifications or improvements are released with a new name or version number. Unlike closed, proprietary code, open-source requires no licensing fees or permission as long as you adhere to the terms of service outlined by the developer. Although tech support is hit-or-miss and depends on the developer, it has a large and active community of developers who are happy to help you work out any issues. You'll also find dozens of digital libraries on the internet that contain base code, modules, and fully formed apps that you can use, alter, and share. There are many reasons why working with open source code is preferable, and these are especially applicable to network monitoring apps and tools.

  • 2020: Expect more from containers, open source and cloud

    2020 is the year in which open source will become even more fundamental to the success of companies as they move to become fully-fledged, digitally-led businesses; proprietary software will lose relevance; companies will increasingly turn to the cloud to deliver value and capitalise on growth opportunities; and containers will finally become mainstream. [...] He also believes that the new decade will herald unprecedented growth when it comes to companies not only becoming container-led but also cloud-native - ready to benefit even more from a cloud-centric (and open) landscape. “South African businesses are having more serious discussions around multi-cloud and hybrid cloud implementations. Throughout this, an open approach, relying on an agile approach through containers, gives organisations the impetus they need to be digital-first,” he says.

  • Rodney Don Holder: Here’s why open source AI is important for development

    As these names suggest, open source references a mindset popular in the Silicon Valley tech industry. Artificial intelligence and machine learning operate on computer coding and incredibly refined hardware components. The open-source mindset believes that making these batches of code and hardware blueprints available to the public does more for humanity than does keeping it all close to the chest. In contrast, Rodney Don Holder explains that a closed source approach seeks to protect code and hardware from the public eye. Their concern is more proprietary than it is collaborative. One example of closed source software is Apple as they work hard to maintain control of their software.

  • What is Apache Tomcat? Introducing the Widely Used Java Servlet and JSP Container

    What is Apache Tomcat? Essentially it’s an open-source Java servlet and Java Server Page container that lets developers implement an array of enterprise Java applications. Tomcat also runs a HTTP web server environment in which Java code can run. Three years after the original release of Java in 1995, Sun Microsystems architect James Duncan Davidson developed an open-source servlet reference implementation for the first Java Servlet API. Java servlets are small Java programs that define how responses and requests are handled by the server. A developer would write their servlet or JSP and let Tomcat conduct all of the routing and backend work.

  • Teledyne Extends S-Parameter Leadership with Open Source Software: SIGNALINTEGRITY

    Teledyne LeCroy, a worldwide leader in electronic test and measurement solutions and a business unit of Teledyne Technologies Incorporated, announces today the availability of an open-source software tool, SignalIntegrity, offering free solutions to signal integrity problems for design and test engineers. In order to avoid signal integrity issues in today's world of gigabit-per-second transfer rates, engineers must have superior tools for the necessary combination of simulation, modeling and measurement. The goal of this software is to provide free tools for solving real-time signal integrity problems. More than 1,500 users have downloaded the Python-based software since it has been made available.

  • Open source all-in-one DevOps platform: OneDev’s UI is easy to use

    Variety is the spice of life, and now there is another DevOps platform to choose from. OneDev is a new, all-in-one, open source Git server with a simple to use UI, customizable issue states and fields, and auto-refreshing issue boards. Browse some of its features and see how it compares to other popular tools. Who knows, maybe OneDev is the platform that you have been searching for.

  • DFINITY Foundation Demonstrated ‘LinkedUp’ Open Source Platform

    It also empowers the next generation of developers so that they can build a new breed of tamper-proof enterprise software systems and open internet services. They aim at democratizing software development. He also added that the Bronze release of the Internet Computer would provide the developers and enterprises with infinite possibilities of building on the Internet Computer. All of this is a reflection of the strength of the Dfinity team that they have made so far. Dfinity has also said that its Internet Computer Protocol enables a new type of software that goes by the name autonomous software. This software guarantees permanent APIs which cannot be revoked. [...] Their second major milestone is of demoing a decentralized web app called LinkedUp on the Internet Computer, which can run on an independent data center in Switzerland.

  • Google Open Sources Albert NLP

    Google has made ALBERT (A Lite BERT) available in an open source version. ALBERT is a deep-learning natural language processing model that the developers say uses far fewer parameters than BERT without sacrificing accuracy. Bidirectional Encoder Representations from Transformers, or BERT, is the self-supervised method released by Google in 2018. It has become known for the impressive results the technique has achieved on a range of NLP tasks while relying on un-annotated text drawn from the web. Most similar NLP systems are based on text that has been labeled specifically for a given task.

  • Scientists working with Google just published the most detailed brain scans ever created

    Google and its partners at the Janelia Research Campus today released the largest, most detailed set of brain scans ever published. The project encompasses nearly one-third of the brain of a fruit fly and includes detailed mappings for more than 25 thousand neurons featuring more than 20 million synapses. The best part: it’s all been released open-source to the public. This is a great day for science. [...] Luckily for organizations and individuals who can’t afford the resources it would take to build this particular project, Google and the scientists at the Janelia Research Campus have published the entire project open-source. Even better, the team painstakingly formatted the data, images, videos, and other information in a way that makes it easily accessible to everyday people and usable by world-class researchers.

  • People of WordPress: Robert Cheleuka

    You’ve probably heard that WordPress is open-source software, and may know that it’s created and run by volunteers. WordPress enthusiasts share many examples of how WordPress changed people’s lives for the better. This monthly series shares some of those lesser-known, amazing stories. [...] Robert first came into contact with WordPress in 2014 when he and a friend started a local tech blog. Before that, all he knew was basic, outdated HTML from high school and some knowledge of Adobe Dreamweaver. They decided to use WordPress, and their new blog looked like it came from the future. They used a theme from the repo and got such positive feedback from the blog they decided to open a content and media publishing agency. While they got a few web redesign jobs thanks to the exposure the blog brought, they lacked the administrative and business skills needed and ended up going their separate ways. Then in his first real job after college Robert finally took it upon himself to learn the ins and outs of WordPress. He learned how to install WordPress on a server and did some research on customizing themes. With that knowledge alone he got his first web design clients and started earning nearly as much as he did at his job. Robert soon realized that free WordPress themes would only take him so far, especially with his limited code skills. Because in Malawi only people who travel abroad have access to credit cards, paying for premium themes was impossible. Like many WordPress designers in developing countries, Robert turned to using pirated themes instead. He knew that was both unsafe and unethical, and decided to learn how to code. Knowing how to build themes from scratch would surely help him rise above the competition.

  • Elastic: Big Data Needs Effective Search To Drive Value

    Elastic N.V. (ESTC) is a provider of opensource software which is used in applications like real time search and analytics. Elastic’s rapid growth is being driven by a rapid growth in the volume of data being generated globally and the need for improved search tools. Elastic potentially has a bright future even as cloud computing vendors introduce the same technology, provided the company continues to offer customers a compelling value proposition.

  • MariaDB Announces Cloud Native Open Source DB

    There's a new version of MariaDB that is designed to make it easier to develop apps using smart transactions and cloud-native data storage. MariaDB began life as an alternative to MySQL when Oracle took over the original MySQL. The new release, MariaDB X4, was announced by MariaDB Corp, which develops and sells an enterprise version of the open source MariaDB database management system. MariaDB has a SQL interface for accessing data, alongside GIS and JSON features.

Security Leftovers

  • Does Your Domain Have a Registry Lock?

    Dijkxhoorn said one security precaution his company had not taken with their domain prior to the fraudulent transfer was a “registry lock,” a more stringent, manual (and sometimes offline) process that effectively neutralizes any attempts by fraudsters to social engineer your domain registrar.

    With a registry lock in place, your registrar cannot move your domain to another registrar on its own. Doing so requires manual contact verification by the appropriate domain registry, such as Verisign — which is the authoritative registry for all domains ending in .com, .net, .name, .cc, .tv, .edu, .gov and .jobs. Other registries handle locks for specific top-level or country-code domains, including Nominet (for .co.uk or .uk domains), EURID (for .eu domains), CNNIC for (for .cn) domains, and so on.

  • Cisco Warns of Critical Network Security Tool Flaw

    The flaw exists in the web-based management interface of the Cisco Firepower Management Center (FMC), which is its platform for managing Cisco network security solutions, like firewalls or its advanced malware protection service. Cisco has released patches for the vulnerability (CVE-2019-16028), which has a score of 9.8 out of 10 on the CVSS scale, making it critical in severity.

  • No big deal, Rogers, your internal source code and keys are only on the open web. Don't hurry to take it down

    Source code, internal user names and passwords, and private keys, for the website and online account systems of Canadian telecoms giant Rogers have been found sitting on the open internet. The leaked software, seemingly uploaded to GitHub by a Rogers engineer before they left the telco, is written in Java and powered various components of Rogers.com. The materials are marked "closed source" and copyright Rogers, yet can be found on the web if you know where to look. Details of and credentials for services and systems on the ISP's internal networks are included. This kind of information, along with source code to skim for security bugs, is a boon for miscreants casing the telco to compromise it. These details may have already been exploited by criminals, or may prove useful for future attacks. It's also a reminder that engineers and management must take all precautions to avoid pushing private company code to public repositories. It should be noted that no customer information nor account details – beyond the names, passwords, and email addresses of some members of the ISP's web development team – are present in the public code repository. The web app blueprints date back to 2015, so just how much of this code remains in production is unclear. One hopes the passwords and keys have been replaced over the past five years, at least. With any luck, this may well be more of an embarrassment to one of Canada's biggest broadband'n'telly telcos than anything else.

  • Rogers’ internal passwords and source code found open on GitHub

    Sensitive data of another major Canadian firm has been found sitting open on the GitHub developers platform. Security researcher Jason Coulls said he recently discovered two open accounts with application source code, internal user names and passwords, and private keys for Rogers Communications. No customer data was found. He suspects the code belonged to a developer who has left the telco. Coulls, who works in the IT department of a Toronto firm and has his own security consultancy, initially told The Register of the discovery, after which the news site contacted Rogers. One problem is the code he saw describes data payloads and how it goes between databases and web services. “You can use that to get to the stuff that people [thieves] would go after,” he explained.

  • How to patch your open source software vulnerabilities

    Software vulnerabilities are a fact of life. Researchers -- if not hackers -- constantly discover new ways to compromise popular software libraries. It's up to enterprises to quickly deploy patches to secure software before hackers get in. Consider the Equifax breach, in which a hacker exposed the data of more than 145 million users, resulting in $575 million in fines for the credit rating agency. A U.S. Senate investigation identified a backlog of over 8,500 unpatched vulnerabilities at Equifax -- the hacker gained access through just one of those unpatched systems. Vulnerability backlogs are especially prevalent within enterprises that rely on open source components. Nearly all applications make use of some open source components that take the place of either mundane or arcane coding tasks. An open source project often has an active community to maintain and augment it, but that's not always the case. Ultimately, open source software requires a leap of faith from the user that what they're adopting is secure and effective.

Entrapment and Digital Prisons (Microsoft GitHub and Sonos)

  • Microsoft open-sources ONNX Runtime model to speed up Google’s BERT

    This is the most recent leap forward in natural language for Microsoft, but not its first attempt to make Google’s BERT better. About a year ago, Microsoft AI researchers also released MT-DNN, a Transformer-based model that set new high performance standards for the GLUE language model performance benchmark.

  • GitHub now uses AI to recommend open issues in project repositories [Ed: Microsoft now uses mindless buzzwords like "HEY HI!!!" (AI) to market its proprietary software trap]
  • AVSystem Releases a New Version of Open-Source Anjay LwM2M SDK

    AVSystem is pleased to announce that an open-source version of Anjay 2.2.1 has just been released on GitHub.

  • See you later, Sonos: Meet the open-source audio system that would perhaps perhaps no longer ever die

    This week, Sonos launched — after which therefore retracted — that it would perhaps perchance ruin-of-life a assortment of popular audio streaming products made by the corporate at some level of its first 10 years in alternate. Sonos had made up our minds to complete improve on yarn of these first-skills products lack sufficient processing vitality and storage to accommodate contemporary aspects. Regardless that there delight in been many enhancements in presents, miniaturization, and general efficiency, loudspeaker skills has no longer fundamentally changed since its introduction in the 1920s. Offered that they’re no longer inclined outside their efficiency specifications, the drivers and cones can closing a long time. Diverse elements inner speakers encompass magnets constituted of ferrous and uncommon earth presents that attain no longer expire.

  • So long, Sonos: Meet the open-source audio system that will never die

    Sonos had decided to end support because these first-generation products lack sufficient processing power and storage to accommodate new features. Although there have been many improvements in materials, miniaturization, and overall performance, loudspeaker technology has not fundamentally changed since its introduction in the 1920s. Provided that they aren't used outside their performance specifications, the drivers and cones can last decades. Other components inside speakers include magnets made out of ferrous and rare earth materials that do not expire. In addition to solid-state MOSFET-based signal amplifiers, self-powered speakers also contain transformers, which are made of solid cores of metal wound with fine conductive wire. Updates to transformer technology in recent years include Gallium Nitride (GaN), which reduces heat and overall footprint. These components, particularly MOSFETs do not "go bad" unless they are abused, such as being subjected to high temperatures, very high voltages, or transient power spikes, which can be mitigated by a simple surge suppressor or power conditioner.

FUD and Openwashing Leftovers

  • Kevin Owocki on Gitcoin, Controversy and the Future of Open Source Funding

    Some of that controversy has been from outside the Ethereum community, pointing to Consensys and Ethereum Foundation support as an example of centralization. Some of the controversy has come from within, as debates rage about what is or isn’t an acceptable use of “public” resources.

  • Sonatype: Secure code with less hassle

    Software development has changed drastically over the past decade. Take a 22-year-old graduate with a degree in computer science. At one time, they would start off testing code, then start to write code line-by-line. Today, 80% of applications are developed using open source software. Instead of laboriously worrying over each caret and comma, code is grabbed and assembled. This can make for quick iterations and rapid project completion.

  • Lyft's open source asset tracking tool simplifies security

    The modern map -- in fact, any map since the Age of Sail -- serves an important purpose in navigation. Exploration feats, such as Magellan's circumnavigation of the globe, Lewis and Clark's American expedition, or more recent excursions to the Earth's polar regions, would not have been possible without mapping knowledge and ability. A cursory look at ancient or medieval history shows that early maps, prior to their use for navigation, served a different purpose entirely. The map in the 15th century manuscript La Fleur des Histoires was by no means intended to be geographically accurate. Instead, it was designed to convey a concept or idea -- in this case, the separation of ruling powers by region. However, the real power of mapmaking -- that is, for navigation -- would not be realized for generations.

  • vChain, the Makers of the CodeNotary Open Source Code Trust Solution With Over 9 Million Monthly Customer Integrity Verifications Raises $7 Million in Series A to Secure Today’s DevOps Process

    vChain, the leading trust and integrity company, announces the close of a $7M Series A investment round. Elaia, a leading European tech venture fund, led the new investment round which includes also other notable investors such as Swiss-based Bluwat and Acequia Capital (Seattle, USA). vChain was founded in late 2018 and released its first product in April 2019.

  • Open source licence series - WhiteSource: permissive is winning, but is there a hurt factor?
  • Open source licence series - Instaclustr: Is open core a rotten deal?

    Ideally, open source software should be, well, free and open.

  • Open source licence series - Percona: is the battle won, or is this a different war?

    Recently, the Cryptographic Autonomy License (CAL) was submitted for OSI consideration. As Holo’s co-founder Arthur Brock explains in his blog post, his goal is to protect end-user privacy and autonomy. Restrictions in this case focus not on whom, but how the software should be used. While many on the OSI board seem to support the licence, Bruce Perens, OSI co-founder and the person who drafted the original Open Source Definition (OSD), resigned from OSI saying, “… it seems to me that the organisation is rather enthusiastically headed toward accepting a licence that isn’t freedom-respecting. Fine, do it without me, please.”

  • Open Source Wood Innovation Award Given to an Active Member
  • Open Source Plant Material And Intellectual Property

    Today we hear the term “open source” more and more. It is a term that is most commonly identified with software and firmware development out of the Silicon Valley. However, the term is becoming common in the plant industry.

  • Garadget review: Open your garage door with open-source technology

    There’s no scheduling system nor (surprisingly) a logging system built into Garadget, but it does support Alexa, Google Assistant, SmartThings, IFTTT, and a whole host of lesser-known third-party tools, but all of that will invariably force you into the system’s forums again. For example, there are two Garadget Alexa skills, one for if you want to say “smart garage” and one for if you want to say “Garadget” to invoke the skill. Setting up a connection to SmartThings requires using Samsung’s developer tools.