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SUSE

New GeckoLinux Rolling Editions Are Out Now, Based on openSUSE Tumbleweed

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Linux
SUSE

After announcing the latest versions of the GeckoLinux Static and GeckoLinux NEXT KDE Plasma editions, the developer also refreshed the GeckoLinux Rolling editions, which are based on the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system.

Therefore, as you an imagine these new GeckoLinux Rolling editions are the most up-to-date ISO releases of the openSUSE-based distribution. GeckoLinux Rolling is available in seven variants with the KDE Plasma 5.19, GNOME 3.36, Xfce 4.14, Cinnamon 4.4, MATE 1.24, and LXQt 0.15 desktop environments, as well as BareBones flavor with the IceWM window manager.

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GeckoLinux ROLLING 999.200729 released

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OS
Linux
News
SUSE

GeckoLinux is pleased to announce the 999.200729 update to its ROLLING editions, thus completing the current refresh cycle of the entire GeckoLinux lineup. GeckoLinux ROLLING spins are generated directly from unmodified openSUSE Tumbleweed and Packman repositories, and the installed system can be updated directly from those official sources. This design decision has allowed GeckoLinux ROLLING users to install and update their systems in a constant rolling fashion over the past two years from the cutting edge and highly stable openSUSE Tumbleweed distribution. Now, GeckoLinux users that need an installation ISO to support very new hardware will find what they need in the GeckoLinux ROLLING 999.200729 set of updated spins.

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10 Years of OpenStack – Alan Clark at SUSE

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OSS
SUSE

Happy 10 years of OpenStack! Millions of cores, 100,000 community members, 10 years of you.

Storytelling is one of the most powerful means to influence, teach, and inspire the people around us. To celebrate OpenStack’s 10th anniversary, we are spotlighting stories from the individuals in various roles from the community who have helped to make OpenStack and the global Open Infrastructure community successful.

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GeckoLinux NEXT Plasma 152.200726 update

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OS
KDE
Linux
News
SUSE

Hi everyone, I'm pleased to announce another update to the GeckoLinux NEXT Plasma edition. The purpose of this edition is not to replace the regular GeckoLinux STATIC Plasma release, but rather as an alternative for those who want the latest Plasma and KDE packages on top of a stable openSUSE Leap base. This is achieved thanks to some additional openSUSE OBS repositories, together with the polished GeckoLinux configuration for the Plasma desktop.

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SUSE/OpenSUSE: Tumbleweed, SUSE Training Credits, Containers

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SUSE

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/30

    Due to a packaging change in a low-level package (krb5), I decided to trigger a full rebuild of openSUSE:Factory. Quite a lot of packages reference krb5-config to find the correct locations, but I could not get a conclusive list. The risk of not doing a full rebuild and having all packages follow the changes of krb5 could lead to devastating results, which I did not want to risk. This in turn meant OBS was busy for a bit longer and we only released two snapshots (0717 and 0720). The next one to be published (0721) will be the one with the full rebuild.

  • SUSE Introduces Training Credits to Help Enterprises Thrive Today and in the Future

    Now, SUSE is making it easier for enterprise customers to ensure their IT staff have the know-how they need to help their businesses thrive today and in the future. With the addition of SUSE Training Credits, customers can buy prepaid credits that can be redeemed for public or private instructor-led training and certification exam vouchers.

  • Setup secure private Docker registry in SUSE Linux Enterprise server 15Sp2

    Containerized application delivery has become the latest trend in today’s IT environment. These container images are distributed by respective Organizations/Communities through their official Docker container registries hosted online. Docker container registries are applications that manages storing and delivering of container images.

    Container images can be pulled from any online registry you can access to ,and you will also able to push your images to online registries. These online registries are public (unless you pay for online space ) and can be accessed by anyone else . It is important to setup an offline / private docker registry so that images can be securely stored offline. A private Docker registry allows you to share your custom images within your organization, keeping a consistent, private, and centralized source of building blocks of your architecture. A private Docker registry gives you better performances for big clusters and high-frequency roll-outs, plus added features like access authentication.

Events: DebianDay, GUADEC 2020 and OpenSUSE + LibreOffice

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GNOME
Debian
SUSE
  • Let's celebrate DebianDay 2020 around the world

    We encourage our community to celebrate around the world the 27th Debian anniversary with organized [DebianDay][1] events. This year due to the COVID-19 pandemic we cannot organize in-person events, so we ask instead that contributors, developers, teams, groups, maintainers, and users promote The Debian Project and Debian activities online on August 16th (and/or 15th).

    Communities can organize a full schedule of online activities throughout the day. These activities can include talks, workshops, active participation with contributions such as translations assistance or editing, debates, BoFs, and all of this in your local language using tools such as [Jitsi][2] for capturing audio and video from presenters for later streaming to YouTube.

    If you are not aware of any local community organizing a full event or you don't want to join one, you can solo design your own activity using [OBS][3] and stream it to YouTube. You can watch an OBS tutorial [here][4].

    Don't forget to record your activity as it will be a nice idea to upload it to [Peertube][5] later.

  • GUADEC 2020 Kicks Off Today as GNOME’s First Virtual Conference

    The GUADEC 2020 (GNOME Users And Developers European Conference) event kicks off today until July 28th as GNOME’s first online conference in the coronavirus era.

    The time has come for the summer Linux conferences to open their doors to virtual visitors, and GUDEC 2020 is the first major Linux conference to switch to an online format. The event was supposed to take place in Zacatecas, Mexico, but as you can imagine, everyone is adapting every day to respond to the needs created by the COVID-19 crisis, which affects us all.

    GUADEC 2020 is the place where GNOME users and developers from all over the world gather together to share knowledge and discuss upcoming features of the next major release of the GNOME desktop environment, which is used by numerous Linux-based operating systems, including Ubuntu, Debian, openSUSE, Fedora, and many others.

  • openSUSE + LibreOffice Virtual Conference Extends Call for Papers

    Organizers of the openSUSE + LibreOffice Virtual Conference are extending the Call for Papers to August 4.

    Participants can submit talks for the live conference past the original deadline of July 21 for the next two weeks.

    The conference is scheduled to take place online from Oct. 15. - 17.

    The length of the talks that can be submitted are either a 15-minute short talk, a 30-minute normal talk and/or a 60-minute work group session. Organizers believe shortening the talks will keep attendees engaged for the duration of the online conference.

SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP2 Officially Released, This Is What’s New

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SUSE

Coming more than a year after SP1 and two years after the launch of the SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 operating system series, SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Service Pack 2 is here to help businesses further accelerate innovation and improve productivity by adding new layers of functionality, updated components and modern technologies.

Highlights of SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP2 include updated cloud images for Alibaba, Azure, AWS, Google, IBM, and Oracle, the ability to deploy large-scale HPC systems in AWS with support for ARM-based Graviton2 CPUs and Elastic Fabric Adapter network interfaces in Amazon EC2 instances, as well as enhanced security with FIPS 140-2 certification-ready packages.

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Direct: SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Service Pack 2 is Generally Available

Released: GeckoLinux [Static] [all editions] 152.200719

Filed under
OS
Development
Linux
News
OSS
SUSE

GeckoLinux is pleased to announce updated spins of its Static series, generated from openSUSE Leap 15.2 and Packman package repositories. Despite the lack of new ISO refreshes during the past couple of years, users have continued to be able to install and update GeckoLinux systems thanks to the fact that it directly uses openSUSE and Packman repository sources. But for users that need to install GeckoLinux on newer hardware, and to continue improving the default configuration, the GeckoLinux Static 152.200719 series is now available. Updated spins of GeckoLinux NEXT Plasma and the GeckoLinux ROLLING series will also be released in the near future.

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openSUSE Ad-hoc Board Election 2020

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SUSE

Back in February 2020 Christian Boltz resigned from the openSUSE Board explaining the reasons behind his decision on the project mailing list. His resignation came about two weeks after Sarah Julia Kriesch's resignation from the Board.

The openSUSE Board was left with two vacant seats to be filled. Sarah had been a board member for just about a few weeks after the 2019-2020 board elections. After her resignation, the openSUSE Board decided to appoint Vinzenz Vietzke on the board based on the results of the 2019-2020 board elections. Following that, only one seat remained vacant on the board. However, before the Election Committee could start discussions for an election to fill that vacant seat, about two weeks after Vinzenz's appointment, openSUSE member Pierre Böckmann called for a No-Confidence vote against the current board. It was unprecedented in the community and that put things on halt for a while.

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Leftovers: OpenSUSE, Debian, Ubuntu and Command Line Heroes (Red Hat)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Debian
SUSE
Ubuntu

  • Release Team Asks for Feedback on openSUSE Leap "15.2"

    The openSUSE release team is would like feedback from users, developers and stakeholders about the release of the of community-developed openSUSE Leap 15.2 through a survey.

    The survey is available at https://survey.opensuse.org.

    openSUSE Leap 15.2 was released on July 2. Two weeks of people installing the release and using it is a good timeframe to capture fresh ideas and thoughts about how people felt about the release. The survey centers on these two questions: what went well and what didn’t go well?

    That is the question the release team is asking of those who installed and used openSUSE Leap 15.2.

    The team hopes the feedback will provide enough information to help improve the release processes and other elements people found important.

    The survey will close on August 4.

  • DebConf Videoteam Sprint Report -- DebConf20@Home

    DebConf20 starts in about 5 weeks, and as always, the DebConf Videoteam is working hard to make sure it'll be a success. As such, we held a sprint from July 9th to 13th to work on our new infrastructure.

    [...]

    For DebConf20, we strongly encourage presenters to record their talks in advance and send us the resulting video. We understand this is more work, but we think it'll make for a more agreeable conference for everyone. Video conferencing is still pretty wonky and there is nothing worse than a talk ruined by a flaky internet connection or hardware failures.

    As such, if you are giving a talk at DebConf this year, we are asking you to read and follow our guide on how to record your presentation.

    Fear not: we are not getting rid of the Q&A period at the end of talks. Attendees will ask their questions — either on IRC or on a collaborative pad — and the Talkmeister will relay them to the speaker once the pre-recorded video has finished playing.

  • Abhijith PA: Workstation setup

    Recently I’ve seen lot of people sharing about their home office setup. I thought why don’t I do something similar. Not to beat FOMO, but in future when I revisit this blog, it will be lovely to understand that I had some cool stuffs.

    There are people who went deep down in the ocean to lay cables for me to have a remote job and I am thankful to them.

    Being remote my home is my office. On my work table I have a Samsung R439 laptop. I’ve blogged about it earlier. New addition is that it have another 4GB RAM, a total of 6GB and 120GB SSD. I run Debian testing on it. Laptop is placed on a stand. Dell MS116 as external mouse always connected to it. I also use an external keyboard from fingers. The keys are very stiff so I don’t recommend this to anyone. The only reason I took this keyboard that it is in my budget and have a backlit, which I needed most.

  • Best practices for an effective remote team in the world of cloud delivery

    Effective communication between customers, engineers, and project managers is the most critical element of successful cloud delivery. This has always been the case, but it is doubly important in the absence of regular, face-to-face contact.

    For remote teams, instant messaging is an invaluable tool. Internally, we use instant messaging both to keep in touch with one another and to coordinate on projects. However, it’s important to keep these two purposes separate. Maintaining one social channel and one business-focused channel prevents casual conversation from disrupting work.

    For communication with customers, the use of email is the standard tool. Indeed, official design decisions should not be made lightly and need to be documented. In order to avoid delays and have everyone stick to action points, we make sure to chase up through phone or message, but always need to communicate through email. This helps ensure that both parties stay up-to-date on a project’s status and that we have written confirmations.

  • Canonical Lets Global SIs Resell, Integrate Entire Portfolio

    An enhanced partner program from Canonical, publisher of the Ubuntu open-source operating system, will enable global systems integrators to resell and integrate the company’s entire portfolio of products and services for data centers, multicloud environments, the edge, and the Internet of Things (IoT).

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S13E17 – Knitting outside

    This week we’ve been filling in forms and doing kitchen renovations. We discuss popularity contest being removed from Ubuntu, 19.10 going EOL, KDEs cross-platform storefront and Linux adopting inclusive language. We also round up our picks from the wider tech news and share an event; remember those!

    It’s Season 13 Episode 17 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Command Line Heroes - Season 5, episode 1: Becoming a coder

    Saron Yitbarek and Clive Thompson start the season by exploring some ways coders start their tech careers—some common, many unexpected. You might be surprised who answers the call to code, where they come from, and how much they’ve already accomplished.

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More in Tux Machines

Modberry 500 CM4 DIN Rail Industrial Computer Features Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4

We’ve been writing about Techbase Modberry industrial embedded computers with DIN-Rail enclosures such as Modberry M500 or M2000 for several years. Most of their systems are powered by SBC’s like Raspberry Pi 4 or AAEON Up Squared, but they’ve also made models based on Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+, and with the launch of Raspberry Pi CM4, the company has now introduced Modberry 500 CM4 industrial computer powered by Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 with up to 8GB RAM and 32GB eMMC flash. Read more

today's howtos

  • Font And Line Settings In Doom Emacs - YouTube

    I am going to cover a few parts of my Doom Emacs config. Specifically, I am going to talk about my settings for fonts and lines. I also talk about what the fringe is and how you enable or disable the fringe.

  • RPKI validation with OpenBSD's rpki-client and Cloudflare's gortr

    This article documents how to install rpki-client (an RPKI relying party software, the actual validator) and gortr (which implements the RPKI to Router protocol) on Debian 10 to provide RPKI validation to routers. If you are using testing or unstable then you can just skip the part about apt pinnings.

  • How To Install Ionic Framework on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Ionic Framework on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, Ionic Framework is helpful for building Android and iOS programs faster. You must install those applications to create a hybrid mobile application. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of Ionic Framework on a Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • How to Configure NGINX as TCP/UDP Load Balancer in Linux

    In this article, we will learn how to configure NGINX as TCP and UDP Load balancer in linux for the applications deployed in Kubernetes cluster.

  • 8 Ways to Check CPU Clock Speed on Linux

    Learn different ways to check cpu clock speed in Linux. Linux system has many tools to grab processor information and grab its speed.

  • How to create Cron Jobs on Linux | FOSS Linux

    Creating and editing a cron job the most amazing part in Linux, where you don't need to restart cron or even your PC after creating or editing a cron job.

  • How to Install Ruby on Ubuntu 20.04 Linux - Linux Concept

    Nowadays, Ruby is the most popular language, especially for SaaS application development. It has a perfect and elegant syntax structure, and it is the language behind the ultimate robust framework known as Ruby on Rails. In this tutorial, we will explain the three different processes to install Ruby on Ubuntu 20.04 machine.

  • How To Install Docker And Pull Images From Docker Hub

    Learn how to install Docker and pull images from Docker Hub

  • Run Ocserv VPN Server & Apache/Nginx on the Same Box with HAProxy

    This tutorial will be showing you how to run OpenConnect VPN server (ocserv) and Apache/Nginx on the same box with HAProxy. OpenConnect (ocserv) is an open-source implementation of the Cisco AnyConnect VPN protocol.

Fedora Community Updates From Red Hat

  • Fedora program update: 2020-43

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora this week. Fedora 33 will be released on Tuesday! I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • Fedora status updates: September 2020

    Welcome to the newly-revitalized monthly set of updates on key areas within Fedora. This update includes Fedora Council representatives, Fedora Editions, and Fedora Objectives. The content here is based on the regular updates submitted to the Fedora Council, published to the project dashboard.

  • Fedora program update: 2020-42 – Fedora Community Blog

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora this week. Final freeze is underway. Please update the Release Readiness page with your team’s status. The Go/No-Go meeting is Thursday. I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • Fedora Community Blog monthly summary: September 2020

    In September, we published 18 posts. The site had 3,176 visits from 2,022 unique viewers. Readers wrote no comments. 13 visits came from Fedora Planet, while 872 came from search engines, and 199 came from the WordPress Android App.

  • GitLab AMA follow-up – Fedora Community Blog

    Last month, we invited folks from GitLab to a public Ask Me Anything (AMA) session. We collected questions from the community in advance about the upcoming Fedora migration to GitLab. The Community Platform Engineering (CPE) team has been working with GitLab for the past few months on understanding and troubleshooting the technical challenges associated with the migration. This AMA was a natural next step to enable the community to participate and give the Fedora community a chance to get to know some of the GitLab team members who are supporting the migration process. During the AMA session, Nuritzi Sanchez, Lindsay Olson, Jason Young, André Luís, Greg Myers, Michelle Gill, Daniel Gruesso, and Nick Thomas from GitLab sat down on IRC with the Fedora and CentOS communities to answer questions live.

  • Crashing saltstack minions on f33?

    It’s a _scope_id bug affecting Salt on Python 3.9. There’s a patch submitted upstream, and 3002+this patch is headed to updates-testing.

  • The Python Maintenance team is hiring

    The Python Maintenance team at Red Hat is looking for a software engineer to join us and help us maintain Python in Fedora and RHEL. Hey, Pythonistas. We’re looking for a software engineer to join us in the Python Maintenance team at Red Hat – our remote-friendly Brno-based team with members throughout the Czech Republic (including Prague and Ostrava) as well as abroad (France, partially Greece, US planned).

Android Leftovers