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SUSE

Tip: Setting up wireless network on SUSE Linux 10.0

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SUSE
HowTos

Are the improved hardware support, easier installations, up-to-date packages, new features in Linux real? To find a partial answer to the question, I decided to test the wireless networking features in SUSE Linux 10.0.

Review: SUSE 10, on the Road

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Reviews
SUSE

I'm on vacation this week. For me, though, vacation includes carrying around my Linux-powered laptop. So while, you're going to have to wait for a while for my full review of SUSE 10, I had to let you know sooner than later about how SUSE 10 handles on the road.

Also on same site:
Installing Linux from a DVD is so... last decade

"openSUSE" v "SUSE Linux"

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SUSE

SUSE Linux 10.0 is available for purchase and download in different flavors and some people are still spreading wrong information (initially started by some journalists). Is it "openSUSE" or "SUSE Linux?"

Also: Best release party ever!

SuSE Linux 10 Downloads Hard To Get

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SUSE

Users equipped with a BitTorrent client may have success downloading Linux 10. The openSuSE.org site warned that it may take several days for the downloading kinks to work out.

HACKING OPENSUSE

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SUSE
HowTos

When you're done installing OpenSUSE 10.0, your desktop system is not complete. You still need support for Java programs, MP3 audio files, and browser plugins for Macromedia Flash, Adobe Acrobat, RealPlayer, and Windows Media Video. You may also want to add support for playing DVD videos on your computer. Here's how.

About SUSE Linux 10.0

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Reviews
SUSE
-s

The long awaited SUSE Linux 10.0 was finally released Thursday, October 6 as planned and listed in the roadmap. I don't know how many downloads they've clocked as of yet, but within minutes of the story breaking the OpenSUSE site and it's download mirrors had slowed to a crawl. There is a lot of interest in this release as evidenced by the large number of reads of my articles during the development cycle. The whole world was excited as I by Novell's decision to provide a free very close sibling to their enterprise product under the gpl and organizing a team to develop it. Up until that point SUSE interested me about as much as going to the dentist. They have my attention now!

Inside the Novell Linux Migration

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SUSE

Details of Novell's migration have been sketchy, but in a public presentation to attendees of Ohio LinuxFest, company specialists gave a rare look inside the ongoing move to Linux and laid out one possible framework for other companies to follow in their own migration plans.

It's Official - SuSE Linux 10.0 is Released!

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SUSE

Oct 6th: SUSE Linux 10.0 OSS GM has been released. The OpenSuSE site is slowing down already under a slashdot effect as the masses flock to get directions to download mirrors.

SuSE Goes Gold?

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SUSE

Yet to be officially announced, SuSE Linux 10.0 iso torrents, cd isos and delta isos are making their way to ftp mirrors around the world.

SuSE 10.1 Alpha1 Report

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Reviews
SUSE
-s

SuSE 10.1 Alpha 1 was recently announced even before 10.0 was even released. Those SuSE folks don't waste any time. No vacation for those boys! Poor fellars. And indeed they already have their plate full. They have begun to implement a few new features as well as using some beta software and they even broke a few things. I love alphas - seriously.

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More in Tux Machines

Devices: PCB, OpenCV/RasPi and NVIDIA Jetson Nano

  • A beginner tries PCB assembly

    I wrote last year about my experience with making my first PCB using JLCPCB. I’ve now got 5 of the boards in production around my house, and another couple assembled on my desk for testing. I also did a much simpler board to mount a GPS module on my MapleBoard - basically just with a suitable DIP connector and mount point for the GPS module. At that point I ended up having to pay for shipping; not being in a hurry I went for the cheapest option which mean the total process took 2 weeks from order until it arrived. Still not bad for under $8! Just before Christmas I discovered that JLCPCB had expanded their SMT assembly option to beyond the Chinese market, and were offering coupons off (but even without that had much, much lower assembly/setup fees than anywhere else I’d seen). Despite being part of LCSC the parts library can be a bit limited (partly it seems there’s nothing complex to assemble such as connectors), with a set of “basic” components without setup fee and then “extended” options which have a $3 setup fee (because they’re not permanently loaded, AIUI).

  • Digitizing a analog water meter

    Sadly, my meter is really dirt under the glass and i couldn’t manage to clean it. This will cause problems down the road. The initial idea was easy, add a webcam on top of the meter and read the number on the upper half it. But I soon realized that the project won’t be that simple. The number shows only the use of 1m^3 (1000 liters), this means that I would have a change only every couple of days, which is useless and boring. So, I had to read the analog gauges, which show the fraction in 0.0001, 0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 m^3. This discovery blocked me, and I was like “this is way to complicated”. I have no idea how I found or what reminded me of OpenCV, but that was the solution. OpenCV is an awesome tool for computer vision, it has many features like Facial recognition, Gesture recognition … and also shape recognition. What’s a analog gauge? It’s just a circle with an triangular arrow indicating the value.

  • NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit-B01 Gets an Extra Camera Connector

    Launched in March 2019, NVIDIA Jetson Nano developer kit offered an AI development platform for an affordable $99.

today's howtos

XMPP - Fun with Clients

As I already wrote in my last blog post there's much development in XMPP, not only on the server side, but also on the client side. It's surely not exaggerated to say that Conversations on Android is the de-facto standard client-wise. So, if you have an Android phone, that's the client you want to try&use. As I don't have Android, I can't comment on it. The situation on Linux is good as well: there are such clients as Gajim, which is an old player in the "market" and is available on other platforms as well, but there is with Dino a new/modern client as well that you may want to try out. The situation for macOS and iOS users are not that good as for Windows, Linux or Android users. But in the end all clients have their pro and cons... I'll try to summarize a few clients on Linux, macOS and iOS... Read more

Linux disk resizing on Chromebooks pushed back to Chrome OS 81

The good news is that plans have been in the works since March of last year to allow you to reclaim some of that space by shrinking or resizing the Linux storage. The bad news is that after being pushed back twice since the feature is being put off again; this time until Chrome OS 81. You’d think this would be a relatively simple thing to implement but in reality, it’s not. That’s because the Chrome OS filesystem has evolved in the past year and due to expected support for a particular file type for older Linux kernels never worked out. I’d rather the Chromium team take their time for a well designed and implemented solution so as not to break any functionality. Plus there’s the challenge of having enough free storage to restore a container backup. Read more