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SUSE

Novell's biggest open source competitor: Apple

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SUSE

A report by Gartner claims that Novell's stiffest competition for the small and medium business server space will come not from Microsoft, but Apple.

Linux Desktops Get a Graphics Boost

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SUSE

The Linux desktop is about to get a 3-D makeover courtesy of Novell.

Novell is contributing a new graphics subsystem called "Xgl" and the associated "Compiz" compositing manager to the granddaddy of all Linux and UNIX windowing infrastructures, X.org.

Making a Genius Scanner Work With SuSE

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SUSE
HowTos

My Genius ColorPage Vivid4 USB scanner worked acceptably under Windows, so it was the time to get it working with SANE.

SUSE 10.1 beta 3 Report

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Reviews
SUSE
-s

A new beta of SUSE was released yesterday and since I missed beta2, I just had to look at beta 3. In a few words, no big changes are afoot, but plenty under-the-hood updates and few surprizes were found. Some of these new and improved items may have shown up in beta 2, so this is our report on SUSE development since beta 1.

Novell Shows Off Linux Desktop 10

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SUSE

Nat Friedman, the company's vice president of Linux desktop engineering, showed Novell Linux Desktop 10 playing videos and MP3 music files, and exchanging music and photos with an iPod and a digital camera, in a keynote presentation at the Solutions Linux conference and trade show on the outskirts of Paris.

Novell targets the SMB market with partnerships

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SUSE

On January 30th, Novell Inc. announced that it will start bundling support and training offerings with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for small and medium-sized businesses via its channel partners.

This news came only days after Novell announced that, as of March 1st, the Linux company will no longer force users into CLAs.

Novell's Linux Strategy Progress Report

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SUSE

Two years after its move into the Linux distribution business, Novell is claiming to be enjoying a renaissance. Matthew Aslett tracks its progress.

Novell's SUSE Linux in Real Time

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SUSE

Concurrent Real-Time Extensions Powered By SUSE Linux is an optimized version of SUSE Linux that provides guaranteed interrupt response times of fewer than 30 microseconds.

SuSE 10.1 Beta 1 Report

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Reviews
SUSE
-s

Woohoo, Suse 10.1 Beta 1 is here, one of the milestones in the development of a new release. It came a bit later than expected, at least for me. I had picked out a coupla fast mirrors before hand and began my download before announcements were made. As soon as OSNews and Distrowatch reported its release, the mirrors slowed to a crawl. It took the better part of the 20th to download SUSE 10.1 beta1. All this to say, SUSE, even in beta, has got to be one of the most popular distros available. And with good reason. I've been following the development of SUSE since the formation of OpenSuse and I have acquired quite a liking to its polish and completeness, its great tools and little extras, and its fast performance and stability. As has become the norm here at Tuxmachines, we installed the new beta to look around and see what we see. This is our report.

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