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SUSE

Novell Strikes Three Open Source Deals

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SUSE

Novell drove home its open source gospel Tuesday, trotting out three major converts to its Linux software suites: the Finnish military, a New England bank and a New York hospital chain.

Novell wows 'em with SLED 10

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SUSE

Thousands of people broke out with applause in Salt Lake City this week, including many jumping to a standing ovation with excitement over what they were seeing.

Sneak peak at next year's Novell Open Enterprise Server

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SUSE

Novell has outlined its long-term roadmap for Linux-based Novell Open Enterprise Server, with the mid-2007 "Cypress" release expected to include server virtualisation, better integration with Novell and Microsoft directories, and more processor support.

Novell Launches Linux 10, Mobile Server

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SUSE

Novell Monday launched its next generation SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 and new products GroupWise Mobile Server and Open Workgroup Suite.

Also: Novell Plans SUSE Linux 11 For 2008

SUSE 10.1 Beta 8 report

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Reviews
SUSE
-s

Well, it's that time of year again. Buttercups are blooming, little birds are making their way back, and a beta 8 of SUSE is released... BETA 8? Wow. Have you ever known a release to go through so many betas? According to the Roadmap, there may only be one or two release candidates though, and we can expect some kind of word as to the final release date sometime around April 13. But these things tend to change often and we'll be right here to keep you posted. We weren't privy to the beta7, so could we expect some major improvements this public release? Well, let's find out.

Will Suse 10's cool looks be enough to win hearts?

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SUSE

It has a clean and has immaculate look about it with enough eye-candy to make it a hit with both Linux enthusiasts good desktop design fans. But does the forthcoming vesion 10 of Suse Linux Enterprise Desktop (previously called Novell Linux Desktop) really have what it takes to make the real inroads into the desktop OS sector Novell so badly needs to make?

Novell hopes its next desktop will leapfrog Windows

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SUSE

Novell on Thursday unveiled the features that will be available in the next version of its Linux desktop product--Suse Linux Enterprise Desktop--which the company claims will be more usable than any other desktop product on the market.

Linux for desktop should 'catch fire' by 2008

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SUSE

Novell has launched the next version of its desktop Linux OS, a release the company hopes will begin a "viral" migration from Windows in the next several years, said Jeff Jaffe, chief technology officer for Novell.

Also: Novell Appoints New Head Linux Honcho

Novell Offers Details on SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10

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SUSE

Novell is betting that its upcoming SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 will be the release that drives widespread business adoption of its Linux desktop, especially as it brings features like integrated desktop search, which is not yet found in its largest competitor, Microsoft's Windows.

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More in Tux Machines

Raptor Computing Is Working On More AMD Radeon Driver Improvements For POWER

Similar to 64-bit ARM (AArch64) improvements we've seen with time for the Radeon Linux driver, Raptor's Timothy Pearson has been working to improve the Radeon support for PowerPC or more specifically POWER9. While NVIDIA offers a POWER9 graphics driver for IBM POWER servers, AMD Radeon graphics jive much better with Raptor's target customers thanks to the open-source driver stack -- allowing a fully open-source graphics/compute stack with the AMD hardware sans the closed-source microcode required by the GPUs, but much better than the completely closed-up NVIDIA driver stack. Read more

Using Menus For Command Line Programs and Scripts

THE holidays are coming (Christmas approaching), so I've taken advantage of some spare time to menu-ise commands that I use frequently. Those commands aren't the mere opening of an application and they often require dealing with input and output (in the command line). So I've created menu.sh and used dialog to craft the following menu, e.g. for operations associated with Techrights. I invoke this menu with the click of one button (of the mouse).

Rianne has a similar menu for commands she often runs (which are long and would otherwise need pasting or typing in length). Her menu looks something like this:

Rianne's menu

Here's the code (bash file) that renders the menu above (it's really that simple!):

#!/bin/bash

HEIGHT=15
WIDTH=40
CHOICE_HEIGHT=4
BACKTITLE="Aloha, Rianne"
TITLE="Rianne @ Ted"
MENU="Choose one of the following options:"

OPTIONS=(1 "Start VPN"
         2 "REDACTED"
         3 "REDACTED"
	4 "REDACTED"
	5 "REDACTED"
	6 "REDACTED"
	7 "REDACTED"
)

CHOICE=$(dialog --clear \
                --backtitle "$BACKTITLE" \
                --title "$TITLE" \
                --menu "$MENU" \
                $HEIGHT $WIDTH $CHOICE_HEIGHT \
                "${OPTIONS[@]}" \
                2>&1 >/dev/tty)

clear
case $CHOICE in
        1)
            echo "You chose Option 1"
sh ~/vpn.sh ;;

        2)
            echo "You chose Option 2"
REDACTED COMMAND ;;
        3)
            echo "You chose Option 3"
REDACTED COMMAND ;;
        4)
            echo "You chose Option 4"
REDACTED COMMAND ;;
        5)
            echo "You chose Option 5"
REDACTED COMMAND ;;
        6)
            echo "You chose Option 6"
REDACTED COMMAND ;;
        7)
            echo "You chose Option 7"
REDACTED COMMAND ;;

esac

Hopefully this inspires other people out there to do the same. It takes a while to set up, but it's a big time saver over the long run.

Android Leftovers

10 Years of Using Linux: How It Was Before, And How it Became

2020 Marks my 10 years of using Linux, a decade of my life that I also spent in supporting, promoting and developing free software both in my local community and globally. But the Linux ecosystem today was nothing like 10 years ago, and we are here today to take a look at the past and how both the Linux ecosystem and other open source software developed through the decade. If you asked anyone who used Linux in 2010, what was your biggest issue? They would tell you: Drivers. Back then, drivers for literally everything on Linux were not that good, and in a lot cases didn’t even exist. Read more