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SUSE

Discontinued SUSE Linux Distribution: 9.1

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SUSE

SUSE Security has announced that SUSE Linux 9.1 (Personal and Professional edition) will be discontinued soon. Having provided security-relevant fixes for more than two years, vulnerabilities found in SUSE Linux 9.1 after June 15, 2006 will not be fixed.

SUSE 10.1 DVD ISOs Available

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SUSE

SUSE Linux 10.1 DVD ISOs are now available for download, as well as LiveDVD version. At this moment it can be downloaded via torrents only. openSUSE.org website still states 18th of May as the date of availability of downloadable DVD version, so expect FTP servers to open around in next 24-48 hours.

SUSE 10.1 and RT2500 Wi-Fi

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SUSE
HowTos

I installed SUSE Linux 10.1 just to realize that my wireless card, which is Asus WL-130g PCI, supporting 802.11b/g, is not functioning. The card is based on Ralink's RT2500 chip. I was very upset as I really needed the card to function, which is installed on desktop. Many are having the same problem, so I decided to write a walkthrough.

SUSE 10.1: ATI Drivers Installation

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SUSE
HowTos

Got my SUSE Linux 10.1 up and runnin and already enjoying, though still got to go through all the customization. I will probably post a review on my experience with SUSE 10.1. But one thing for sure, the ATI drivers gave me a little kick, before I came up with these instructions, that I hope will work on most of the computers. Remember that I was trying to install these drivers as to later be able to install and launch Xgl/Compiz on desktop.

This time I decided to make the howto with more pics, thinking that maybe this way it will be easier for you guys to understand what is going on. At least I tried my best, well nearly. Here we go.

Novell Pot Meets Community Kettle

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SUSE

I think we may have hurt Novell's feelings.

That's really the only reason I can come up with to justify CTO Jeff Jaffe's remarks regarding the open source community during a product announcement briefing with CNET News earlier this week. That--or a desperate need to grab headlines.

SUSE Linux 10.1 Final Report

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Reviews
SUSE
-s

It is certainly no secret that OpenSUSE released their SUSE Linux 10.1 Final yesterday. The news was carried on about every computer news site in existence. It was big news and just about everyone was excited. I'd like to know how many downloads have actually occurred. The site had to be minimized early in the morning and downloads from all the mirrors I tried moved like molasses. I'm not sure, but it seems this release has generated even more interest than the landmark 10.0 last October. Perhaps I can understand that, given that this release has some exciting new features. I would speculate that on the top of many people's list is the inclusion of the XGL desktop. We at tuxmachines have tried to keep you abreast of the changes coming forth from the SUSE team, but the final was even better than we dared to predict. This is our final report on the development cycle of 10.1.

Review of SUSE 10.1

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Reviews
SUSE

After being postponed, SUSE 10.1 was finally released on the 11th of May. That day, http://www.opensuse.org was down, probably dying under the huge number of people eagerly pressing F5 on their Internet browser. However, the ISO files were present on a few mirrors and the "GM" (Gold Master) acronym in their name indicated that this was the official release.

Suse 10.1 review!

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Reviews
SUSE

In this review, I'm hopefully going to highlight most of the changes Joe end-user might notice when upgrading or switching over to 10.1. As with every SUSE release we get to see some new eye-candy and graphics on the install, and this time around SUSE has not left me disappointed in the least.

Interview: Novell's Greg Mancusi-Ungaro

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Interviews
SUSE

In issue 80 of Linux Format, on sale now, we have an interview with Greg Mancusi-Ungaro -- the director of marketing for Linux and open source at Novell. Here are a few of the questions we asked Greg...

SUSE Linux 10.1 Released

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SUSE

After lot of work and several delays, we proudly announce the
availability of SUSE Linux 10.1. In tribute to 42 and as today is the
fifth anniversary of the death of Douglas Adams, we dedicate this
release to him.

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More in Tux Machines

Devices: PCB, OpenCV/RasPi and NVIDIA Jetson Nano

  • A beginner tries PCB assembly

    I wrote last year about my experience with making my first PCB using JLCPCB. I’ve now got 5 of the boards in production around my house, and another couple assembled on my desk for testing. I also did a much simpler board to mount a GPS module on my MapleBoard - basically just with a suitable DIP connector and mount point for the GPS module. At that point I ended up having to pay for shipping; not being in a hurry I went for the cheapest option which mean the total process took 2 weeks from order until it arrived. Still not bad for under $8! Just before Christmas I discovered that JLCPCB had expanded their SMT assembly option to beyond the Chinese market, and were offering coupons off (but even without that had much, much lower assembly/setup fees than anywhere else I’d seen). Despite being part of LCSC the parts library can be a bit limited (partly it seems there’s nothing complex to assemble such as connectors), with a set of “basic” components without setup fee and then “extended” options which have a $3 setup fee (because they’re not permanently loaded, AIUI).

  • Digitizing a analog water meter

    Sadly, my meter is really dirt under the glass and i couldn’t manage to clean it. This will cause problems down the road. The initial idea was easy, add a webcam on top of the meter and read the number on the upper half it. But I soon realized that the project won’t be that simple. The number shows only the use of 1m^3 (1000 liters), this means that I would have a change only every couple of days, which is useless and boring. So, I had to read the analog gauges, which show the fraction in 0.0001, 0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 m^3. This discovery blocked me, and I was like “this is way to complicated”. I have no idea how I found or what reminded me of OpenCV, but that was the solution. OpenCV is an awesome tool for computer vision, it has many features like Facial recognition, Gesture recognition … and also shape recognition. What’s a analog gauge? It’s just a circle with an triangular arrow indicating the value.

  • NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit-B01 Gets an Extra Camera Connector

    Launched in March 2019, NVIDIA Jetson Nano developer kit offered an AI development platform for an affordable $99.

today's howtos

XMPP - Fun with Clients

As I already wrote in my last blog post there's much development in XMPP, not only on the server side, but also on the client side. It's surely not exaggerated to say that Conversations on Android is the de-facto standard client-wise. So, if you have an Android phone, that's the client you want to try&use. As I don't have Android, I can't comment on it. The situation on Linux is good as well: there are such clients as Gajim, which is an old player in the "market" and is available on other platforms as well, but there is with Dino a new/modern client as well that you may want to try out. The situation for macOS and iOS users are not that good as for Windows, Linux or Android users. But in the end all clients have their pro and cons... I'll try to summarize a few clients on Linux, macOS and iOS... Read more

Linux disk resizing on Chromebooks pushed back to Chrome OS 81

The good news is that plans have been in the works since March of last year to allow you to reclaim some of that space by shrinking or resizing the Linux storage. The bad news is that after being pushed back twice since the feature is being put off again; this time until Chrome OS 81. You’d think this would be a relatively simple thing to implement but in reality, it’s not. That’s because the Chrome OS filesystem has evolved in the past year and due to expected support for a particular file type for older Linux kernels never worked out. I’d rather the Chromium team take their time for a well designed and implemented solution so as not to break any functionality. Plus there’s the challenge of having enough free storage to restore a container backup. Read more