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SUSE

Petition for the re-election of the openSUSE Board

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SUSE

The openSUSE Election Committee was tasked to find our whether 20% of the community are actually calling for the re-election.

We have at our disposal the Helios voting platform which we can use to register an "answer" from community members. Instead of running a vote with several answer options, we consulted among Election Officials, and agreed that there will be only one answer to select, which will represent a virtual signature, similar to like signing an electronic petition. That will allow us to effectively measure whether 20% of the community are petitioning for a re-election of the openSUSE Board.

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SUSE and Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
SUSE

SUSE: The time for major tech change is now

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SUSE

The coronavirus pandemic is rapidly changing technology. Remember when remote work was a radical idea? Not so much anymore. But Linux and cloud power SUSE. CEO Melissa Di Donato said in a recent survey of global IT leaders it was already deprioritizing the "legacy of complex applications, infrastructure, and processes."

Where are we going? To an outcome-focused IT approach relying on software-defined infrastructure, the hybrid cloud, and edge computing as fast as we can. And how fast is that? Within the next two years, according to 2,000 IT leaders and application developers who told SUSE and Insight Avenue.

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SUSE/OpenSUSE and IBM/Red Hat

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Data Driven Transformation Showcased @ SUSECON Digital with Fujitsu and SUSE
  • Has Hybrid Cloud Finally Come of Age?
  • Updated KDE Frameworks, Redis Arrive in Tumbleweed, Curl Gets New Experimental Feature

    KDE Frameworks 5.70.0 arrived in snapshot 202000511; these libraries for programming with Qt introduced a small font theme for Kirigami and improved icon rendering on multi-screen multi-dpi setups. KConfig added the standard shortcut for “Show/Hide Hidden Files” with the Alt+ keys. The text rendering bitmap package freetype2 updated to version 2.10.2 and dropped support for Python 2 in Freetype’s API reference generator; the version also supports Type 1 fonts with non-integer metrics by the new Compact Font Format engine introduced in FreeType 2.9. The 1.45.6 e2fsprogs package for maintaining the ext2, ext3 and ext4 file systems improved e2fsck’s ability to deal with file systems that have a large number of directories, such that various data structures take more than 2GB of memory; the new version uses better structure packing to improve the memory efficiency of these data structures. The libressl 3.1.1 package completed an initial Transport Layer Security 1.3 implementation with a completely new state machine and record layer. TLS 1.3 is now enabled by default for the client side, with the server side to be enabled in a future release. The changelog noted that the OpenSSL TLS 1.3 API is not yet visible/available. RubyGem had a plethora of packages updates in ; rubygem-fluentd 1.10.3 had some refactored code and enhancements like adding a set method to record_accessor. The rubygem-activerecord-6.0 6.0.3 package fixed support for PostgreSQL 11+ partitioned indexes and noted a recommendation in the changelog that applications shouldn’t use the database Keyword Arguments (kwarg) in connected_to. The database kwarg in connected_to is meant to be used for one-off scripts but is often used in requests, which is a dangerous practice because it re-establishes a connection every time. It’s deprecated in 6.1 and will be removed in 6.2 without replacement.

  • Red Hat and NVIDIA: Powering innovation at the edge

    Enterprises and telecommunication providers are looking at the edge as the newest IT footprint, observing the development of intelligent edge applications and monitoring the shift of workloads from traditional datacenters to the outer boundaries of public and private networks. The common realization is that bringing processing power and storage closer to the end user or data source is imperative to delivering high value services, scaling across geographically distributed locations and providing a faster, more satisfying service experience.

    Despite edge being somewhat of an opposite to the cloud from a datacenter point of view, it is much closer to "home" if you are operating outside of traditional enterprise boundaries. Yet in the context of the open hybrid cloud, the concept of edge computing is fully embraced. A large number of physical devices operating at the edge look somewhat like a cloud, especially since they have to work and be managed in unison, even if each one of them is performing its own set of tasks.

  • Red Hat and AWS extend collaboration: Introducing Amazon Red Hat OpenShift

    As we move deeper into the era of cloud computing, one thing remains clear: There’s no silver bullet for organization-wide digital transformation. We often see IT decision-makers seeking prescriptive guidance around the changing requirements of IT operations and application development in a containerized world. To better help these organizations address business-specific enterprise technology footprints and challenges, today we’re announcing an extension of the collaboration between Red Hat and AWS to deliver Amazon Red Hat OpenShift, a jointly-managed and jointly-supported enterprise Kubernetes service on AWS.

    Amazon Red Hat OpenShift will be a fully managed service that enables IT organizations to more quickly build and deploy applications in AWS on Red Hat’s powerful, enterprise Kubernetes platform, using the same tools and APIs. Developers will be able to build containerized applications that integrate natively with the more than 170+ integrated AWS cloud-native services to enhance agility, innovation and scalability. By blending Red Hat’s and AWS’ decades of enterprise IT knowledge and experience into Amazon Red Hat OpenShift, IT organizations will be able to launch cloud-native systems that can retain enterprise-grade security, be more agile and see improved performance while driving cost efficiencies.

What’s new in openSUSE Leap 15.2

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SUSE

openSUSE Leap 15.2 has entered the Beta phase on the 25th February 2020. I have recently installed this on my laptop to check it out. Leap 15.2 will coincide with SUSE Enterprise Linux Desktop 15 Service Pack 2. Both Leap and SLED share a lot of underlying packages, so this will be (again) a rock solid release.

openSUSE Leap 15.2 features many big updates. This includes a new version of the KDE desktop environment, a new version of the GNOME desktop environment and a new Linux kernel. In the Leap 15.2 column of the table below, I have highlighted in green the packages that are significantly changed in comparison to Leap 15.1. And in blue, I have highlighted the packages that are changed compared to Leap 15.1 at time of its release, but which are now also available in updated Leap 15.1 installations.

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SUSE carve out affecting openSUSE

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SUSE

SUSE’s partnership with EQT started last year - and now SUSE starts to separate more and more services from MicroFocus.

SUSE and openSUSE are not only cooperating and share code - often enough they also share the same services. As result, openSUSE is also affected from some of the separation work which is currently going on behind the scenes.

This weekend, the official bug tracking tool for openSUSE related issues (https://bugzilla.opensuse.org/) is one of the targets. The SUSE-IT team is migrating the service together with the bug tracking tool for SUSE to new systems in a new location. As the database has been grown over the last 25(!) years, the scheduled downtime is covering the whole weekend:

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MicroOS - The OS that does "just one job"

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SUSE

The openSUSE Summit 2020 kicked off yesterday. Like many others this summit was a virtual one too. It ran on a platform managed by openSUSE fan and user P. Fitzgerald.

I was busy with work stuff and couldn't watch the presentations live. I hopped on and off on the platform. I didn't want to miss Richard's presentation about MicroOS but yet I missed it. Luckily he was quick to record his session and upload it on YouTube. I got a chance to watch it afterwards. Surely, all other presentations will be available on openSUSE TV soon and I'll be able to catch-up.

If you didn't rush to watch Richard's presentation on YouTube right-away, here are a few hints that may encourage you to watch it.

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Modernizing AutoYaST

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SUSE

YaST2 is a venerable project that has been around for more than 20 years now. It keeps evolving and, with every SUSE and openSUSE release, it takes several new features (and a couple of new bugs). Needlessly to say that, to some extent, YaST2 is showing its age. We are aware of it, and we have been working to tackle this problem. The successful rewrite of the storage layer, which brought many features, is an example we can feel proud of.

Now that the development of SLE 15 SP2 and openSUSE Leap 15.2 features is mostly done, we have started to look to AutoYaST. The purpose of this article is to present our initiative to modernize AutoYaST.

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Top 5 Ways SUSE is Supporting You in These Times

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SUSE

The world is facing an unprecedented threat, each of us are doing what we can to support the global response against COVID-19.
Here are the top 5 ways SUSE is stepping up to help...

Sorry we have not perfected virtual conferencing enough to bring the Guinness to you yet, but hey, you can always heft a pint from your own office, J
Not quite making my top 5 list, but also very important is flexible payment terms. We also have a number of incentives specifically designed for those in government or airline, travel, transportation and tourism & leisure industries.

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Btrfs Authenticated File-System Support Looks To Be Revived

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Linux
SUSE

Last year a SUSE developer sent out a set of patches adding authentication support to the Btrfs file-system. Btrfs already has checksums on meta-data blocks and data blocks while the original implementation of these authentication patches was performing HMAC on a SHA256 checksum as a keyed hash. A proper key in turn is then needed to mount a verified file-system.

That Btrfs authentication support wasn't picked up at the time and the SUSE engineer, Johannes Thumshirn, since left the company. But following new inquiries over the work, it sounds like it will be revived for this authentication that could be used for the likes of embedded devices and containers.

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Also: Linux 5.8 Seeing The Preliminary Changes Ahead Of RISC-V EFI Support

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