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SUSE Continues Working On Linux Core Scheduling For Better Security

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Linux
SUSE

SUSE and other companies like DigitalOcean have been working on Linux core scheduling to make virtualization safer particularly in light of security vulnerabilities like L1TF and MDS. The core scheduling work is about ensuring different VMs don't share a HT sibling but rather only the same VM / trusted applications run on siblings of a core.

SUSE's Dario Faggioli presented at the KVM Forum 2019 at the end of October in Lyon, France. Dario's presentation covered the latest work on core-scheduling for virtualization.

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Also: The Disappointing Direction Of Linux Performance From 4.16 To 5.4 Kernels

OpenSUSE Project Name Change Vote - Results

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SUSE
  • OpenSUSE Project Name Change Vote - Results
    Dear all,
    
    The vote has ended and the results have been released.
    
      Do we change the project name?
    
      Yes    42
      No    225
    
    Regards,
    
    Ish Sookun
    
  • openSUSE votes not to change its name

    The openSUSE project has been considering a name change as part of its move into a separate foundation since (at least) June. A long and somewhat controversial vote of project members has just come to an end, and the result is conclusive: 225-42 against the name change.

SUSE, Fedora and GNOME News/Developments

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Red Hat
GNOME
SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2019/44

    While some folks are enjoying/celebrating Halloween, Tumbleweed stayed away from being scary. Even though there have been 5 snapshots (1024, 1025, 1027, 1028 & 1030) released this week, nothing there should scare you – at all: simply upgrade to the latest snapshot, as you always do.

  • Fedora 30 : GIMP 2.10.14 with flatpak.

    Flatpak is a software utility for software deployment and package management for Linux. It is advertised as offering a sandbox environment in which users can run application software in isolation from the rest of the system. see Wikipedia .
    Flatpak builds available in i386, x86-64, ARM and AArch64.

  • FPgM report: 2019-44

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. Fedora 31 was released on Tuesday. Fedora 29 will reach end of life on 26 November.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • Debarshi Ray: Toolbox — A fall 2019 update

    Fedora 31 ships with cgroups v2 by default. The major blocker for cgroups v2 adoption so far was the lack of support in the various container and virtualization tools, including the Podman stack. Since Toolbox containers are just OCI containers managed with Podman, we saw some action too.

    After updating the host operating system to Fedora 31, Toolbox will try to migrate your existing containers to work with cgroups v2. Sadly, this is a somewhat complicated move, and in theory it’s possible that the migration might break some containers depending on how they were configured. So far, as per our testing, it seems that containers created by Toolbox do get smoothly migrated, so hopefully you won’t notice.

    However, if things go wrong, barring a delicate surgery on the container requiring some pretty arcane knowledge, your only option might be to do a factory reset of your local Podman installation. As factory resets go, you will lose all your existing OCI containers and images on your local system. This is a sad outcome for those unfortunate enough to encounter it. However, if you do find yourself in this quagmire then take a look at the toolbox reset command.

    Note that you need to have podman-1.6.2 and toolbox-0.0.16 for the above to work.

  • GNOME's Mutter Adds XWayland Full-Screen Games Workaround

    Thanks to Red Hat's Hans de Goede there is another optimization to GNOME's Mutter around XWayland full-screen gaming. 

    The work by the prolific Red Hat desktop developer is for X11 games that rely upon XRandR to change the resolution while also using the NET_WM_STATE_FULLSCREEN window manager hint when going into full-screen mode. 

    [...]

    The Mutter change can be found here while the xorg-server/XWayland side change was merged in October and will be present in whenever the next X.Org Server release finally materializes.

SUSE: High Availability Cluster Services, Oracle Server Infrastructure and Carla Schroder Joins the Team

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SUSE
  • SUSE High Availability Cluster Services – How to stop, start or view the status

    This blog post aims to summarize the starting and stopping options available for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) High Availability (HA) cluster stack operations. I will offer brief answers to a few questions that have been commonly asked by our customers and partners.

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Now Available On Oracle Cloud Infrastructure

    SUSE makes available its enterprise Linux server distribution for use on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure.

  • How to Keep Customers Happy and Liking Us a Lot, part 1

    We’re all here for various reasons, such as paychecks, a love of great open source software, creativity, wanting to build cool products to help people, nice offices full of colleagues and treats…whatever our reasons, SUSE exists as a business to sell enterprise open source software. Or, perhaps more accurately, to build great open source software and sell first-rate services and support.
    It is very difficult to build a successful business on open source software. It’s like the restaurant business: there is no secret sauce, no magic, no lock-in. Restaurants use the same food and recipes that anyone can use. What they’re really selling is a good experience for the customer: good food, good service, pleasant atmosphere, convenience. Anyone can open a restaurant, just like anyone can launch a new open source software project, so there is a lot of competition. Restaurants have very high rates of failure. Just like restaurants, to succeed as a commercial open source business you have to be better: much, much better. You can’t rely on lock-in and scary restrictive contracts like the closed-source proprietary software companies do.

Tumbleweed Gets New OpenSSH Major Version

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Security
SUSE

Snapshot 20191027, brought an update to KDE Plasma 5.17.1. The bugfix update fixed the Mouse KCM acceleration profile on X11 on the Plasma Desktop and had a fix for KWIN with visibility of the Context Help button. Part of the update to Plasma 5.17.1 came in the 20191022 snapshot on the day of the release from the KDE Project. The kcalendarcore package was update to KDE Frameworks 5.63.0, which landed in last week’s snapshots. Quite a few YaST packages arrived in the snapshot as well; some of the those YaST packages adapted to new Keyboard handling. The other two packages updated in the snapshot were to the AV1 decoder dav1d 0.5.1, which fixed a build issue in ARM64 assembly if debug info was enabled, and desktop calculator, qalculate 3.5.0, which had a fix for steradian conversion that is related to the surface area of a sphere. The Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer is being fixed and doesn’t have a rating for the snapshot.

Seven packages arrived in the 20191025 snapshot and the openssh 8.1 was a major upgrade. The new major version added some new features like an experimental lightweight signature and verification ability. According to the changelog, “signatures may be made using regular ssh keys held on disk or stored in a ssh-agent and verified against an authorized_keys-like list of allowed keys. Signatures embed a namespace that prevents confusion and attacks between different usage domains (e.g. files vs email).” The VirtualBox hypervisor for x86 virtualization had a minor update to version 6.0.14; the maintenance release fixed potential issue in the networking with interrupt signalling for network adapters in UEFI guests. The Network Time Protocol package chrony 3.5 added support for hardware timestamping on interfaces with read-only timestamping configuration and Persistent Memory programming package pmdk 1.7 introduced two new Application Program Interface (APIs) in librpmem and libpmemobj.

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Also: SUSE Brings Enterprise Linux to Oracle Cloud to Meet Growing Demand for Cloud-Based Business Deployments

SUSE/OpenSUSE: Work by Thomas Zimmermann and OpenSUSE Leap 15.0 EOL

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SUSE
  • ASpeed DRM Driver Ported To Atomic Mode-Setting

    The "AST" DRM/KMS display driver that can be used with the many servers supporting ASpeed display hardware now has work pending for atomic mode-setting.

    SUSE's Thomas Zimmermann sent out the set of nine patches that convert the existing AST KMS driver into supporting atomic mode-setting as well as universal planes.

  • openSUSE Leap 15.0 Reaches End of Life on November 30th 2019

    openSUSE Leap 15.0 reaches the end of life on November 30, 2019. openSUSE Leap 15.0 reaches the end of its support after 1.5 years of life.

    openSUSE Leap 15.0 is based on SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 15 resources, released May 25, 2018.

SUSE/OpenSUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2019/43

    This week it has been another three snapshots released upon the users. There were some updates, as usual, and a larger stack has been removed from Tumbleweed, after weeks of preparation. The three snapshots released were 1018, 1022 and 1023

  • Webinar: Boost Developer Productivity with SUSE Cloud Application Platform

    Last week, Troy Topnik and I presented a webinar on how to boost developer productivity with SUSE Cloud Application Platform — our modern application delivery platform that brings an advanced cloud native developer experience to Kubernetes and enables fast and efficient delivery of cloud native applications at scale. Developers can serve themselves and get apps to the cloud in minutes instead of weeks. SUSE Cloud Application platform eliminates manual IT configuration and helps accelerate innovation by getting applications to market faster. Streamlining application delivery opens a clear path to increased business agility, led by enterprise development, operations, and DevOps teams.

  • SUSE YES Certification Kit for SUSE Enterprise Storage 6 Now Available

    With the official release of SUSE Enterprise Storage 6, SUSE Partner Engineering would like to announce the availability of the latest SUSE Enterprise Storage (SES) Certification Kit version 1.2. The SESCK v1.2 has been updated and enhanced to provide certification support for SUSE® Enterprise Storage 6.

GNOME, LLVM, Samba, Ruby Packages Update in Tumbleweed

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GNOME
SUSE

Snapshot 20191018 provided minor updates for both Mozilla Firefox 69.0.3 and Thunderbird 68.1.2. The update to Firefox fixed a bug that prompted Yahoo mail users to download files when clicking on emails and the Thunderbird update fixed some glitches and fixed the address book import from a CSV. GNOME software updated to version 3.34,which could be the version that will come in openSUSE Leap 15.2. GNOME’s Thessaloniki release includes visual refreshes for a number of applications and the background selection settings also received a redesign, making it easier to select custom backgrounds. Developers using GNOME 3.34 will notices more data sources in Sysprof that make performance profiling of applications easier. Improvements to Builder include an integrated D-Bus inspector. Javascript bindings for GNOME were also updated with the gjs 1.58.1 version and gtk3 3.24.12 fixed a pointer offsets under X11 and Wayland. Python2 runtime support was removed with the updated of the samba 4.11.0 package; python 3.4 or later is required.

Also in the 20191018 snapshot was an update for the new programing language vala 0.46.3 that focuses on GNOME developers had multiple additions to the package. Programing language ruby 2.6.5 fixed a code injection vulnerability along with three other Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures. openSUSE’s snapper 0.8.5 package updated to allow trailing comments in configuration files. The Linux Kernel updated to 5.3.6. NetworkManager 1.18.4 improved the handling of externally added policy routing rules and for rules that are taken over after a restart of a NetworkManager service. The NetworkManager-applet 1.8.24 package added support for SAE authentication (WPA3 Personal). Fix regression fixes were made in both the 2.62.1 versions of glib2 and glib-networking; the latter also made two memory leak fixes. Other noteworthy packages that were updated in the snapshot were webkit2gtk3 2.26.1, libsoup 2.68.2, grilo 0.3.10, and dconf 0.34.0. The snapshot is trending at a stable rating of 92, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

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Openwashing by SUSE: How AWS combined with the SUSE open source mindset leads to your success

SUSE/OpenSUSE: Name Change, YaST, MicroOS and More

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SUSE
  • openSUSE project: vote on name change

    The openSUSE project informed it's members by mail to vote for a potential name change. The vote ends on 07.11.2019 at 23:59 UTC. In a Wiki article the openSUSE Board and Election Committee have gathered the most important arguments for and against a name change for all members.

  • Highlights of YaST Development Sprint 87

    As you may know, we have recently extended YaST to support additional encryption mechanisms like volatile encryption for swap devices or pervasive encryption for data volumes. You can find more details in our blog post titled "Advanced Encryption Options Land in the YaST Partitioner".

    Those encryption mechanisms offer the possibility of adjusting the sector size of the encryption layer according to the sector size of the disk. That can result in a performance boost with storage devices based on 4k blocks. To get the best of your systems, we have instructed YaST to set the sector size to 4096 bytes whenever is possible, which should improve the performance of the encrypted devices created with the recently implemented methods.

    Additionally, we took the time to improve the codebase related to encryption, based on the lessons we learned while implementing volatile and pervasive encryption. We also performed some additional tests and we found a problem that we are already fixing in the sprint that has just started.

  • toolbox - bring your own (debugging) utilities with you

    Our Container Host OS openSUSE MicroOS and our Kubernetes platform openSUSE Kubic are both using transactionl-update to apply patches to the system. This implies that a read-only root filesystem is used. While this has big advantages, like it allows to update a cluster automatically in a safe way, this has one drawback: you need to reboot to activate new installed packages. But what if you want to debug a problem and the utility you need is not installed? Who says, that the problem is still debuggable after a reboot?

  • Why software-defined storage is right for the hybrid cloud

    Beyond being an intermediate step, hybrid cloud isn’t particularly well defined. If you took a random selection of three CIOs, they’d each likely explain it differently. It’s a bit like asking three people to imagine a farmyard animal: one thinks “pig”, one thinks “hen” and the other thinks “cow”. All three are right, but all three are imagining something very different. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have given us an official hybrid cloud definition but not everyone agrees that this is that helpful. Lauren Nelson, principle analyst at Forrester, described this definition as “far from reality”. We’re at the top of the hype cycle and Nelson was making a fair point: NIST’s definition calls for active bursting from one environment into another, and while most enterprises would see themselves as hybrid, cross environment bursting is in practice nearly as rare as real unicorns.

  • A “Silly Season Blog” – Have Fun with Sapstartsrv and Pacemaker

    This blog is about a funny integration of a plain Linux service into the SAP start framework sapstartsrv and SUSEs High Availability solution based on pacemaker. This solution is not intended to run in productive environments but should demonstrate how to integrate special services.

Events: Cloud Foundry Summit, OpenSUSE Asia and FSFE System Hackers

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OSS
SUSE
  • The Importance of Culture in Software Development

    A few weeks ago at Cloud Foundry Summit, I had the chance to grab a few of our partners and talk about how culture plays a part in the software development process. While appropriate tools are very important, it is only part of the story. Culture will make or break any change initiative regardless of how amazing our technology is.

  • openSUSE Asia Summit

    I met Edwin and Ary earlier this year at the openSUSE Conference in Nuremberg. They invited me to come to the openSUSE Asia Summit happening in Bali. I wasn't sure that I would be able to attend it. But then, around June I saw a tweet reminding about the deadline for the Call for Proposal for the openSUSE Asia Summit and I thought maybe I should give it a try.

    I submitted a workshop proposal on MicroOS and a lightning talk proposal to the openSUSE Asia CFP team. Both were accepted and I couldn't be happier. It gave me the chance to meet friends from the openSUSE community again, learn and share more.

    We do not have direct flights to Indonesia. I traveled through Air Mauritius to Kuala Lumpur and then Malaysia Arlines to Denpasar, Bali. I spent almost 24 hours traveling before reaching my hotel in Jimbaran. I was totally knackered when I arrived but the enthusiasm of being there for the summit was stronger than anything.

    I booked a taxi through Traveloka ahead of my arrival in Bali. It was recommended by Edwin. When I compared other taxi fares I felt glad I booked it online. I also bought a SIM card on my way to the hotel with a 6GB data package. I knew we'd all communicate mostly on Telegram, just as we did for oSC 2019. My hotel WiFi connection wasn't great but I was impressed by the 4G coverage of my mobile Internet provider, XL Axiata. Mobile connectivity was extremely helpful as I would rely on GoJek car-hailing for the next few days.

  • The 3rd FSFE System Hackers hackathon

    On 10 and 11 October, the FSFE System Hackers met in person to tackle problems and new features regarding the servers and services the FSFE is running. The team consists of dedicated volunteers who ensure that the community and staff can work effectively. The recent meeting built on the great work of the past 2 years which have been shaped by large personal and technical changes.

    The System Hackers are responsible for the maintenance and development of a large number of services. From the fsfe.org website’s deployment to the mail servers and blogs, from Git to internal services like DNS and monitoring, all these services, virtual machines and physical servers are handled by this friendly group that is always looking forward to welcoming new members.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: Vagrant, CSV to JSON and Python Bits

  • A beginner's guide to using Vagrant

    Vagrant describes itself as "a tool for building and managing virtual machine environments in a single workflow. With an easy-to-use workflow and focus on automation, Vagrant lowers development environment setup time, increases production parity, and makes the 'works on my machine' excuse a relic of the past."

  • Convert CSV to JSON with miller
  • New Project, Who Dis? - Building SaaS #38

    In this episode, we started a brand new project! I had some internet troubles so this “stream” is actually a local recording from my computer. We created a new Django project from scratch and set up Heroku to handle deployments. In spite of the streaming trouble, we were able to get a bunch done. We started the project from scratch so we made a repository on GitHub with some .gitignore settings tailored for Python projects.

  • RunSnakeRun for Python3 Out

    So I finally pushed out the Python3/wxPython Pheonix compatible release of RunSnakeRun. The Python3 version has to run Python2 in order to load Python2 pstats dumps, and Meliae doesn't AFAIK support Python3 yet, so I expect I'll just drop support for it eventually. The code is now living on GitHub rather than Launchpad.

  • Angular 9 CRUD Tutorial: Consume a Python/Django CRUD REST API

    This tutorial is designed for developers that want to use Angular 9 to build front-end apps for their back-end REST APIs. You can either use Python & Django as the backend or use JSON-Server to mock the API if you don't want to deal with Python. We'll be showing both ways in this tutorial.

  • Django: Angular 9/8 Tutorial By Example: REST CRUD APIs & HTTP GET Requests with HttpClient

    In this Angular 9 tutorial, we'll learn to build an Angular 9 CRUD example application going through all the required steps from creating/simulating a REST API, scaffolding a new project, setting up the essential APIs, and finally building and deploying your final application to the cloud.

Red Hat: Containers and Kubernetes, Systemd Everywhere, AMQ Streams on OpenShift and System Administrators

  • Containers and Kubernetes can be essential to a hybrid cloud computing strategy

    Hybrid cloud is gaining ground among enterprises that want to expand computing resources with public cloud infrastructure while still using their on-premise, data center environments. Adding public cloud can mean more elasticity, scalability, and even faster time to market. But if you want to improve the chances that your hybrid cloud can deliver on its promise, you need to think about adding containers to the mix. Linux containers provide a way to encapsulate application code in a way that makes the code more portable and faster to deploy. More and more organizations are using containers as part of the infrastructure for microservices-based, cloud-native applications. Containers can be portable across environments such as Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform and consistent, so they can speed application delivery times and make it easier for teams to collaborate, even if those teams are working in different deployment environments. And they can serve as a bridge between your data center and public cloud environments.

  • Systemd-homed Looks Like It Will Merged Soon For systemd 245

    Announced back in September at the All Systems Go event in Berlin was systemd-homed as a new effort to improve home directory handling. Systemd-homed wants to make it easier to migrate home directories, ensure all user data is self-contained, unify user-password and encryption handling, and provide other modern takes on home/user directory functionality. That code is expected to soon land in systemd. Systemd-homed was talked about by Lennart as being ready for versions 244 or 245. Now that systemd 244 shipped at the end of November, systemd-homed is looking like it will soon land in Git.

  • Understanding Red Hat AMQ Streams components for OpenShift and Kubernetes: Part 3

    In the previous articles in this series, we first covered the basics of Red Hat AMQ Streams on OpenShift and then showed how to set up Kafka Connect, a Kafka Bridge, and Kafka Mirror Maker.

  • What personality trait most defines a sysadmin?

    When you think of a system administrator, who do you think of? Chances are, most of us have taken a Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) test at some point in our careers. For me, my results typically come up as INTJ, and I've always thought the traits associated with that type (introversion, intuition, thinking, judging) have aligned with my interest in technology and the kind of work I enjoy. But that doesn't mean that those are the only characteristics that make a good sysadmin. Far from it. A successful team is made up of a diversity of skills, viewpoints, and personal characteristics.

  • How to identify a strong sysadmin job applicant

    When a company looks for new resources with skills in a specific focus area—especially in IT—the challenge is on. Why? Because only a few in the company, if any, have even a vague notion of how to verify the skills they are looking for. The work of a system administrator is a key function, and if it goes wrong, the very existence of the company is at stake (something I’ve been unfortunate to witness when called in on an emergency rescue effort).

Fedora 31 Elections Results

The Fedora 31 election cycle has concluded. Here are the results for each election. Congratulations to the winning candidates, and thank you all candidates for running in this election! Council One Council seat was open this election. A total of 243 ballots were cast, meaning a candidate could accumulate up to 729 votes (243 * 3). # votes Candidate 520 Dennis Gilmore 259 Alberto Rodríguez Sánchez 237 John M. Harris, Jr. FESCo Five FESCo seats were open this election. A total of 273 ballots were cast, meaning a candidate could accumulate up to 2184 votes (273 * 8). # votes Candidate 1490 Miro Hrončok 1350 Kevin Fenzi 1115 Zbigniew Jędrzejewski-Szmek 879 Fabio Valentini 877 David Cantrell 868 Justin Forbes 813 Randy Barlow 534 Pete Walter Read more Also: Fedora program update: 2019-49

GNU: Guile 2.9.6 (Beta) and GCC 10's C++20 "Spaceship Operator"

  • GNU Guile 2.9.6 (beta) released

    We are delighted to announce GNU Guile 2.9.6, the sixth beta release in preparation for the upcoming 3.0 stable series. See the release announcement for full details and a download link. This release fixes bugs caught by users of the previous 2.9.5 prerelease, and adds some optimizations as well as a guile-3 feature for cond-expand.

  • GCC 10's C++20 "Spaceship Operator" Support Appears To Be In Good Shape

    The C++20 spaceship operator support was merged in early November for GCC 10. The commits this week meanwhile allow the operator to be used with std::pair and std::array, among other related commits in recent weeks. See the GCC C++ status page for the state of C++20/C++2A with GCC 10. Most C++20 functionality is already in place even on GCC 8/9 but some pieces remain around atomic compare-and-exchange with padding bits, modules support, coroutines, using enum, and more implicit moves. 14 Comments