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SUSE

Tumbleweed Gets New Mesa, KDE Frameworks, GNOME Packages

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A total of four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released this week that brought new updates for the Linux Kernel, Mesa and a major version update of libglvnd.

RADV received several fixes in snapshot 20180424 with the update to Mesa 18.0.1. Mesa core also had some patches to fix issues around overriding the OpenGL/ES supported version through environment variables, and a patch to fix an issue with texture samples found in “The Witness” through Wine. An updated description for the SSLProtocol option was made available with the apache2 2.4.33 package and apparmor 2.13 delivered a change of the (writeable) cache directory to /var/cache/apparmor/ with the new btrfs layout. The reason for using /var/lib/apparmor/cache/, which was “it’s part of the / subvolume”, is gone, and /var/cache makes more sense for the cache, according to the changelog. The cleanup process and behavior are a lot better with the update of ccache 3.4.2. Backup tool deja-dup 38.0 was a major update and exclude snap cache directories by default. GTK has a new ‘Widgetbowl‘ demo and the wayland backend now supports the stable xdg-shell protocol in gtk3 3.22.30. Linux Kernel 4.16.3 arrived in the snapshot and the GL Vendor-Neutral Dispatch library, libglvnd, was bumped to major version 1.0.0 thanks to EGL and GLX interfaces being defined and stable. The Tumbleweed rating tool is currently treading the snapshot as stable with an 88 rating.

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SUSE: openSUSE Tumbleweed and SUSE in HPC

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SUSE
  • Krita, Linux Kernel, KDEConnect Get Updated in Tumbleweed

    There have been a few openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots released in the past two weeks that brought some new features and fixes to users.

    This blog will go over the past two snapshots.

    The last snapshot, 20180416, had several packages updated. The adobe-sourceserifpro-fonts package updated to version 2.000; with the change, the fonts were refined to make the Semibold and Bold heavier. Both dbus-1 and dbus-1-x11 were updated to 1.12.6, which fixed some regreations introduced in version 1.10.18 and 1.11.0. The gtk-vnc 0.7.2 package deprecated the manual python2 binding, which will be deleted in the next release, in favor of GObject introspection. Notifications that caused a crash were fixed in kdeconnect-kde 1.3.0. The 4.16.2 Linux Kernel made ip_tunnel, ipv6, ip6_gre, ip6_tunnel and vti6 better to validate user provided tunnel names. Due to a build system failure, not all 4.16.2 binaries were built correctly; this will be resolved in the 20180417 snapshot, which will be released shortly. Krita 4.0.1 had multiple fixes from its major version upgrade. The visual diff and merge tool meld 3.19.0 added new features like a new per-pane status bar with selectors for syntax highlighting and text encoding. Python Imaging Library python-Pillow 5.1.0 removed the freetype-2.9.patch and YaST had several packages with a version bump.

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing in the SLE 15 Beta Program!
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Prepares HPC Module

    The upcoming release of SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 is offering an HPC (High Performance Computing) module for development, control, and compute nodes. Today that SLE15-HPC module is now available in beta.

SUSE Launches Beta Program for SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing

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While SUSE is working hard on the major SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 release, they recently announced that the SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing (HPC) platform is now a dedicated SUSE Linux Enterprise product based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 15, available for public testing on 64-bit and ARM 64-bit architectures.

SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 will introduce numerous new features and improvements, including a brand new installer that offers a single unified method to install one of the supported SUSE Linux Enterprise products, including the SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing module, which comes with a set of components used in high-performance computing environments.

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Also: SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Prepares HPC Module

openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.16, KDE Plasma 5.12.4

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KDE
SUSE

Quite a few snapshots have been released this week and the last one for OpenSuSE Tumbleweed, bringing some of the latest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source software. Among these, we can mention the recently released Linux 4.16 kernel series as the operating system is now powered by Linux kernel 4.16.2.

"The 4.16.2 Linux Kernel made ip_tunnel, ipv6, ip6_gre, ip6_tunnel and vti6 better to validate user provided tunnel names. Due to a build system failure, not all 4.16.2 binaries were built correctly; this will be resolved in the 20180417 snapshot, which will be released shortly," said Douglas DeMaio in a recent report.

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Elections for openSUSE Board and Schedule

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openSUSE Leap 15 Release Scheduled for May 25

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The release of openSUSE Leap 15 is scheduled to be release during the first day of this year’s openSUSE Conference in Prague, Czech Republic on May 25.

The package submission deadline for non-bug fix package updates is April 24 as Leap enters the release candidate phase. The scheduled release for Leap 15 is May 25 at 12:00 UTC.

Leap has been using a rolling development model for building Leap 15 beta versions. Bug fixes and new packages have been released via snapshots to users testing the beta versions. The snapshots for the test version will stop and maintenance and security updates for Leap 15’s release will begin next month. Linux professionals and anyone looking to use Leap 15 are encouraged to test the beta versions as there is still snapshots being released and announced on the openSUSE Factory Mailing List. A list of items to test is available here.

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Also: OpenSUSE Leap 15 Planned For Release At The End Of May

SUSE Embracing Raspberry Pi

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SUSE
  • Raspberry Pi and Linux take on enterprise with SUSE support for the $35 computer

    Yet today that is exactly what is happening in an increasing number of businesses, which are finding ways to tailor the versatile but sub-$40 Raspberry Pi computer to their needs.

    The growing use of Pi boards by business has led SUSE to begin offering commercial support for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) for Arm running on the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B.

  • SUSE bakes a Raspberry Pi-powered GNU/Linux Enterprise Server

    SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 SP3 (SLES) has been released for the diminutive Raspberry Pi computer.

    SLES is aimed at enterprise users of the open-source operating system, restricting itself to a major version update every three or four years, with more minor service packs hitting every 18 months or so.

    Longer term support makes the product an attractive one for users less keen to live at the bleeding edge of an ill-advised apt-get command on a rival distro.

Tumbleweed Now Has Ratings for Snapshots

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SUSE

openSUSE’s rolling distribution Tumbleweed produces high-quality snapshots and a new rating tool for the snapshots has labeled two out of the last four snapshots as stable.

The past two snapshots are still pending a rating as it takes about a week after the snapshot release to develop a rating. This blog will cover the last two snapshots that are pending and list some of the new software that arrived in the snapshots.

The most recent snapshot, 20180326, had several new packages including python-packaging 17.1 and python-setuptools 39.0.1. The python-packaging 17.1 dropped support for python 2.6, 3.2, and 3.3. The update version python-setuptools from 38.5.2 to 39.0.1 now vendors its own direct dependencies and no longer relies on the dependencies as vendored by pkg_resources. The C library for reading, creating, and modifying zip archive, libzip 1.5.0, enabled more functionality by updating dependencies and simplified the licence by the use of a standard cryptographic library instead of custom Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) implementation. IRC client hexchat 2.14.1 made some changes to the preferences so the window can be scroll-able. GNOME’s messaging program empathy reverted back to version 3.12.14 and gnome-documents 3.28.0 updated translations and replaced pkgconfig(libgepub) with pkgconfig(libgepub-0.6). The Linux Kernel 4.15.13 became available in the snapshot, which added the Intel Total Memory Encryption feature, and YaST had several packages updated including autoyast2 4.0.44, which can properly abort when probing devices fails during installation.

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Also: Linux on Raspberry Pi: SUSE support turns $35 board into enterprise IoT platform

SUSE bakes a Raspberry Pi-powered GNU/Linux Enterprise Server

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Linux
SUSE

SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 SP3 (SLES) has been released for the diminutive Raspberry Pi computer.

SLES is aimed at enterprise users of the open-source operating system, restricting itself to a major version update every three or four years, with more minor service packs hitting every 18 months or so.

Longer term support makes the product an attractive one for users less keen to live at the bleeding edge of an ill-advised apt-get command on a rival distro.

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GCC 8 Aims For Release Candidate In April, But Regressions Remain

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GNU
SUSE

Richard Biener of SUSE issued a status report today on GCC 8.0.1 ahead of the GCC 8.1 stable release expected in the weeks ahead.

The GCC 8 code-base remains open for regression and documentation fixes. Per the annual GNU Compiler Collection release process, they usually hit their first release candidate by April. But for GCC 8 they still have a number of open regressions that may push back their RC1 hopes for mid-April.

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Also: Elections for openSUSE Board Approaching

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More in Tux Machines

Critical Live Boot Bug Fixed and Ubuntu 18.04 is Finally Released

A critical bug in live boot session delayed Ubuntu 18.04 LTS release for several hours. The bug has been fixed and the ISO are available to download. Read more

Nintendo Switch hack + Dolphin Emulator could bring GameCube and Wii game support

This week security researchers released details about a vulnerability affecting NVIDIA Tegra X1 processors that makes it possible to bypass secure boot and run unverified code on some devices… including every Nintendo Switch game console that’s shipped to date. Among other things, this opens the door for running modified versions of Nintendo’s firmware, or alternate operating systems such as a GNU/Linux distribution. And if you can run Linux… you can also run Linux applications. Now it looks like one of those applications could be the Dolphin emulator, which lets you play Nintendo GameCube and Wii games on a computer or other supported devices. Read more

Openwashing Leftovers

Linux Foundation: New Members, Cloud Foundry, and Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit

  • 41 Organizations Join The Linux Foundation to Support Open Source Communities With Infrastructure and Resources
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced the addition of 28 Silver members and 13 Associate members. Linux Foundation members help support development of the shared technology resources, while accelerating their own innovation through open source leadership and participation. Linux Foundation member contributions help provide the infrastructure and resources that enable the world's largest open collaboration communities.
  • Cloud Foundry for Developers: Architecture
    Back in the olden days, provisioning and managing IT stacks was complex, time-consuming, and error-prone. Getting the resources to do your job could take weeks or months. Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) was the first major step in automating IT stacks, and introduced the self-service provisioning and configuration model. VMware and Amazon were among the largest early developers and service providers. Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) adds the layer to IaaS that provides application development and management. Cloud Foundry is for building Platform as a Service (PaaS) projects, which bundle servers, networks, storage, operating systems, middleware, databases, and development tools into scalable, centrally-managed hardware and software stacks. That is a lot of work to do manually, so it takes a lot of software to automate it.
  • Jonathan Corbet on Linux Kernel Contributions, Community, and Core Needs
    At the recent Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit, I sat down with Jonathan Corbet, the founder and editor-in-chief of LWN to discuss a wide range of topics, including the annual Linux kernel report. The annual Linux Kernel Development Report, released by The Linux Foundation is the evolution of work Corbet and Greg Kroah-Hartman had been doing independently for years. The goal of the report is to document various facets of kernel development, such as who is doing the work, what is the pace of the work, and which companies are supporting the work.