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SUSE

SUSE's Flavio Castelli on Docker's Rise Among Linux Distros

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

Docker has only gained traction since its launch a little over a year ago as more companies join the community's efforts on a regular basis. On July 30, the first official Docker build for openSUSE was released, making this distribution the latest among many to join the fray. I connected with Flavio Castelli, a senior software engineer at SUSE, who works extensively on SUSE Linux Enterprise and has played a major role in bringing official Docker support to openSUSE. In this interview, he discuses the importance of bringing Docker to each Linux distribution, the future of Docker on SUSE Linux Enterprise, and other interesting developments in the Docker ecosystem.

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European Space Agency are using SUSE Linux

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SUSE
Sci/Tech

Actually SUSE Linux began deployment at ESA in 2012 and has been continuing until now, the distro is used by 450 teams in the European Space Operations Centre at ESA, this includes being used by Mission Control Systems who are responsible for simulation and control of aircraft and satellites outside the atmosphere and further still.

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Docker comes to openSUSE

Filed under
OSS
SUSE

Docker is more popular in enterprise data centers and clouds now than ice-cream on a hot summer day in a day-care center. So, it comes as no surprise that openSUSE, SUSE's community Linux distribution, has adopted Docker as well.

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Factory-fresh delivery: Get your OpenSUSE fix daily

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SUSE

Until now, as with most new versions of software, new code for a new version of OpenSUSE had been bottled up for group testing at a beta or milestone stage.

In the OpenSUSE world, this milestone stage had taken place in something called the "Factory".

The milestone approach is now being abandoned.

The goal is to get more users and contributors involved in development and testing phase, speeding up fixes and improving quality.

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GSoC: Open Source Event Manager Organizer Dashboard

Filed under
Development
Google
SUSE

In the past 4 months during this years Google Summer of Code (GSoC), a global program that offers student developers stipends to write code for open source software projects, Christian Bruckmayer collaborated with other students and mentors to code a dashboard for the Open Source Event Manager (OSEM). In this series of three posts Christian will tell you about his project and what he has learned from this experience.

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OpenSUSE Factory Turns Into Rolling Release Distribution

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SUSE

OpenSUSE "Factory" up to now has referred to the development version of the openSUSE Linux distribution while being announced by SUSE today is that it's also going to serve as an independent distribution under a rolling-release development model.

OpenSUSE Factory will still serve where openSUSE development takes place, but it's also going to aim for being a distribution on its own as a "tested and stable fresh-daily bleeding-edge distribution."

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kGraft Being Discussed For Inclusion Into Linux-Next

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

The SUSE method for live kernel patching, kGraft, is being proposed for possible inclusion into the linux-next branch in hopes it will be merged into an upcoming Linux kernel release cycle.

The kGraft patches for live kernel patching continue to be revised and reviewed but at the same time there's still Kpatch that's been developed by Red Hat with some different design principles for updating the running kernel in real-time. To date there's been no general consensus on the superior solution nor any agreement to try to merge Kpatch and kGraft.

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SymplyOS Leaf Is a Light and Interesting Distro Based on openSUSE

Filed under
OS
SUSE

There are so many Linux distributions in the world that sometimes it's difficult to keep track of each and every one of them. Despite what people might think about Linux distros, the truth is that most of them are actually uninteresting and of sub-par quality.

People are used to the quality of systems like Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint, or openSUSE, but not all distros have been created equal. In fact, users wouldn't install such distros because they simply lack a team with the manpower to make the operating system interesting.

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openSUSE 13.1 vs Ubuntu 13.10: a friendly match

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SUSE
Ubuntu

Ubuntu is one of the most popular GNU/Linux-based operating system, along with Linux Mint. Ubuntu started off as a great operating system which, with the help of LUGs and communities, became extremely popular.

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openSUSE Edu Li-f-e 13.1.1 MATE Is Now Available for Download

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SUSE

The Edu Li-f-e edition of openSUSE is bundled with a lot of goodies useful for students, teachers, as well as IT admins or educational institutions. It's been around for quite some time and it usually follows the other major releases of openSUSE, in this case, 13.1.1.

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More in Tux Machines

10 tips for easier collaboration between office suites

Yes, you are likely using the Microsoft formats for your documents. However, they don't always follow OpenDocument Format (ODF) standards. Instead of opting for the proprietary Microsoft formats, switch over to one that's welcomed by nearly all office suites: ODF. You'll find a much more seamless collaboration process and fewer gotchas when moving between office suites. The only platform that can have a bit of trouble with this format is Android. The one Android office suite that works well with ODF is OfficeSuite 7 Pro. Read more

Outsourcing your webapp maintenance to Debian

It turns out that I'm not the only one who thought about this approach, which has been named "debops". The same day that my talk was announced on the DebConf website, someone emailed me saying that he had instituted the exact same rules at his company, which operates a large Django-based web application in the US and Russia. It was pretty impressive to read about a real business coming to the same conclusions and using the same approach (i.e. system libraries, deployment packages) as Libravatar. Regardless of this though, I think there is a class of applications that are particularly well-suited for the approach we've just described. If a web application is not your full-time job and you want to minimize the amount of work required to keep it running, then it's a good investment to restrict your options and leverage the work of the Debian community to simplify your maintenance burden. The second criterion I would look at is framework maturity. Given the 2-3 year release cycle of stable distributions, this approach is more likely to work with a mature framework like Django. After all, you probably wouldn't compile Apache from source, but until recently building Node.js from source was the preferred option as it was changing so quickly. While it goes against conventional wisdom, relying on system libraries is a sustainable approach you should at least consider in your next project. After all, there is a real cost in bundling and keeping up with external dependencies. Read more

How Intel HD Graphics On Linux Compare To Open-Source AMD/NVIDIA Drivers With Steam On Linux

As earlier this week I did a 20-way AMD Radeon open-source comparison, looked at the most energy efficient Radeon GPUs for Linux gaming, and then yesterday provided a look at the fastest NVIDIA GPUs for open-source gaming with Nouveau, in this article is a culmination of all the open-source graphics tests this week while seeing how Intel Haswell HD Graphics fall into the mix against the open-source Radeon R600/RadeonSI and Nouveau NV50/NVC0 graphics drivers. Read more

Leftovers: Gaming