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SUSE

5 things that set openSUSE, elementary OS and Ubuntu apart

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SUSE
Ubuntu

I am a huge fan of openSUSE and Arch Linux; those are the two distributions that I run on my main system. But I don't belong to any fan-base; I also run some of the major Linux distributions on my machines, to keep an eye on their development.

One distribution that’s getting a lot of attention lately is elementary OS. I have been using it on a virtual machine and I love what they are doing. Then there is Ubuntu, one of the most popular Linux-based operating systems. The latest release of Ubuntu was announced this week and since I use all three in some capacity, I decided to see where they stand against each other.

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SUSE Manager 3

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get KDE Plasma 5.6.2, Frameworks 5.21 and Mesa 11.2.0

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openSUSE Tumbleweed users received many snapshots during the last two weeks, since the beginning of the April, so it's time to keep you guys up to speed with what's new in the rolling GNU/Linux distribution.

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SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • Free software equalizes economic segregation in schools

    I, along with other members of the openSUSE community, were fortunate enough to attend Rather’s keynote speech. Rather, who came from a small farming town in Texas and whose father was a ditch digger, credits self-determination, his wife and great teachers, who believe and care about students, as a key to his prosperity.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/14 & 15

    It seems to be difficult in the last weeks to find really interesting new features to write about. The fact that Plasma 5.6 and GNOME 3.20 are already available takes a lot of wind out of the sails. So a request to all of you: keep the things coming

  • openSUSE debug repository

    I am running openSUSE Leap 42.1 in a Vagrant box and while I had to debug a small executable file, I came across a message prompting me to install the glibc-debuginfo-2.19-19.1.x86_64 package.

  • Git work flows in the upcoming 2.7 release

    The upcoming Open Build Service (OBS) 2.7 release will deliver massive improvements to the way we are dealing with git sources for builds.

    OBS was designed for Linux distribution creation, not software development. In your typical distribution creation work flow you get a new upstream release in the form of a tar ball from time to time, and you add patches on top of that for local fixes. Nowadays the OBS is also used for development of software projects not in the context of a distribution. That work flow has completely different requirements: for every commit a new build, developers want continuous builds.

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE

openSUSE Linux Is Being Ported to IBM z Systems and LinuxONE

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SUSE

Berthold Gunreben of SUSE Linux informed the openSUSE community about the upcoming availability of the openSUSE Linux operating system for the IBM z Systems architecture.

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SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE Linux Gets a New CTO

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SUSE

SUSE named a new CTO today, with Dr. Thomas Di Giacomo taking on the the role of Chief Technology Officer, reporting to CEO Nils Brauckmann.

The last time I personally ever spoke to a SUSE CTO was way back in 2009, when Markus SUSERex (now CEO of OwnCloud) held the job, and SUSE was still part of Novell.

Giacomo joins SUSE from Swisscom Hospitality Services, where he was CTO and vice president of innovation. Giacomo has as a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Geneva, where he was a senior researcher

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SUSE Phone, openSUSE Conference

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SUSE
  • Will openSUSE develop the SUSE Phone?

    I am currently in the process of interviewing the leaders of every Linux distribution on the planet, with the goal of helping us get to know the people behind the projects better. Having just wrapped up discussions with the heads of both elementary and Fedora (and others in the works) I decided it was time to talk about openSUSE.

    This gets a little tricky as, earlier this year, I was elected to a position on the openSUSE board. I thought, for a moment, about either skipping the openSUSE interview or having someone else conduct it – to avoid the perception of bias.

  • Update on openSUSE Conference

    There are 15 more days to submit a proposal for the openSUSE Conference in Nuremberg June 22 – 26, so I would like to provide an update to the community about the conference.

    As you might already be aware, there will be SaltStack, ownCloud, Kolab and SUSE Labs summits during the conference and we also plan on having a program for kids on Saturday, June 25.

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More in Tux Machines

Open source SDR SBC runs Snappy Ubuntu on Cyclone V

The open source, $299 “LimeSDR” board runs Snappy Ubuntu Core on a Cyclone V, and supports user-defined radios ranging from ZigBee to LTE. UK-based Lime Microsystems, which develops field programmable RF (FPRF) transceivers for wireless broadband systems, has launched an open source software defined radio (SDR) board on CrowdSupply. Like other Linux-based SDR systems we’ve seen, the LimeSDR uses an FPGA to help orchestrate wireless communications that can be tuned, manipulated, and reconfigured to different wireless standards via software. Read more

Critical Infrastructure Goes Open Source

The electrical grid, water, roads and bridges—the infrastructure we take for granted—is seldom noticed until it's unavailable. The burgeoning open source software movement is taking steps to help rebuild crumbling U.S. civil infrastructure while capitalizing on expansion in emerging markets by providing software building blocks to help develop interoperable and secure transportation, electric power, oil and gas as well as the healthcare infrastructure. Under a program launched in April called the Civil Infrastructure Platform, the Linux Foundation said the initiative would provide "an open source base layer of industrial grade software to enable the use and implementation of software building blocks for civil infrastructure." Read more

Where have all the MacBooks gone at Linux conferences?

In past years, the vast ocean of Apple logos really undercut any statement of “Linux is great.” People would, inevitably, retort with, “Then why are all the 'Linux People' using Macs?” Admittedly, that was a great point and has been a source of shame for many of us for a very long time. But now things are different. The Apple logos are (mostly) gone from Linux conferences. This may be an unscientific observation from one person attending a few conferences in North America. Regardless, it's a great feeling. Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu 16.04 to-do list
    UBUNTU 16.04 or Xenial Xerus, the latest upgrade of the popular Linux distribution, became available as a free download last month, and early reviews have been favorable. Instead of upgrading my existing Ubuntu 15.10 system, this time I opted for a fresh install. I also decided to give the improved Unity 7 desktop a go, instead of installing my preferred alternative XFCE. The installation process was trouble-free, but because I started from scratch, I had quite a bit to add and tweak after the OS itself was installed.
  • Ubuntu Founder Pledges No Back Doors in Linux
    VIDEO: Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical and Ubuntu, discusses what might be coming in Ubuntu 16.10 later this year and why security is something he will never compromise. Ubuntu developers are gathering this week for the Ubuntu Online Summit (UOS), which runs from May 3-5, to discuss development plans for the upcoming Ubuntu 16.10 Linux distribution release, code-named "Yakkety Yak."
  • Ubuntu & Other Ubuntu Spins Look At Making Room To Grow
    With Ubuntu's install images continuing to be oversized with pushing 1.4GB on recent releases, Ubuntu developer Steve Langasek has raised the new limit for Ubuntu desktop images to 2GB. Other Ubuntu flavors are also following in this move. Langasek has raised the size limit for images now to 2GB for being able to accomodate the current oversized images plus still having room to grow.
  • Ubuntu’s Snap packages aren’t yet as secure as Canonical’s marketing claims
    Canonical has been talking up Snaps, a new type of package format featured in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. “Users can install a snap without having to worry whether it will have an impact on their other apps or their system,” reads Canonical’s announcement. But this isn’t true, as prominent free software developer Matthew Garrett recently pointed out.