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SUSE

Xfce 4.16 Desktop Lands in openSUSE Tumbleweed, Download Now

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SUSE

If you’ve been waiting for Xfce 4.16 to land in openSUSE Tumbleweed, I have some good news today as the wait is over and you can install the desktop environment right now from distribution’s software repositories and upgrade from Xfce 4.14.

Xfce 4.16 brings many goodies for fans of the lightweight desktop environment, including fractional scaling, dark mode for the Panel, CSD (Client-side decorations) support for all the Settings dialogs, a revamped About Xfce dialog with info about CPU, GPU and RAM, as well as a refreshed look with new icons and color palette.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed ARM Adds Support for Raspberry Pi 400 and Raspberry Pi 4 CM

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SUSE

While this new openSUSE Tumbleweed ARM snapshot may look like an ordinary one, the biggest change is the fat that it now supports Raspberry Pi Foundation’s recently unveiled Raspberry Pi 400 personal computer kit, which is in fact a 4GB Raspberry Pi 4 board disguised as a keyboard.

In addition, openSUSE Tumbleweed ARM now also supports the latest Raspberry Pi 4 Compute Module (CM), which is a Raspberry Pi 4 board in a compact form factor designed specifically for deeply embedded applications.

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OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Updates

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SUSE
  • Tumbleweed Rolls Into The New Year - openSUSE News

    The holidays might be over and the new year is here, but users of openSUSE Tumbleweed didn’t see any difference in the amount of snapshots released over the holiday season.

    Tumbleweed snapshots have been rolling out daily before toasting to new beginnings last week.

    Providing a fresh point of view for the new year, snapshot 20210106 brought an update to the 3D graphics package Mesa with version 20.3.2. The update brings in several new features upgrading from the 20.2.4 version with new Radeon Vulkan drivers and web rendering with EGL_KHR_swap_buffers_with_damage on X11. Two Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures exploits were fixed in an update of nodejs14 with version 14.15.4; CVE-2020-8265, which could corrupt memory leading to a Denial of Service exploit, and CVE-2020-8287, which had an HTTP Request Smuggling weakness, were both fixed. Xen had a patch update and removed some code. Other packages to update in the snapshot were busybox 1.32.1, libstorage-ng 4.3.78 and a few others.

    Snapshot 20210105 updated a single package with the update of terminus-bitmap-fonts 4.49.1. The newer version added Open Type Bitmap support and altered ascii to be more useful with a back quote.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2021/01 – Dominique a.k.a. DimStar (Dim*)

    Dear Tumbleweed users and hackers,

    A new year is already upon us, the first week of it is already. We humans might have to get used to writing ‘2021’ instead of ‘2020’, for Tumbleweed, this seems not to matter at all. The week has kicked off strong with 6 snapshots (0101, 0102, 0103, 0104, 0105, and 0106). The number of incoming submissions is also increasing again, showing that contributors are returning from their well-deserved holiday.

openSUSE Community Publishes End of Year Survey Results

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SUSE

The openSUSE community has published the End of the Year Community Survey results.

The results provided some significant information about the project’s tools, its distributions, the demographics of the users as well as how the community is contributing to the project.

The highest percentage of users were between the ages of 35 and 49, according to the results. More than half the respondents were from Europe; the Americas made up roughly a quarter of the respondents and Asia 10 percent. Both Oceania and Africa respondents had similar percentages below 2 percent.

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OpenSUSE and KDE Leftovers

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KDE
SUSE
  • OpenSUSE Leap 15.2 essential post-install tweaks

    There you go. Hopefully, this guide will make your openSUSE experience more pleasant, more accessible. As I've outlined in my review, the updates part is the big issue, and if you can or are willing to get past it, then this tweaking article has value. Otherwise, none of this really makes sense.

    Well, provided you did reach this bit, then we talked about additional repositories, package conflicts, multimedia, fonts, some theming and polish, extra applications, Plasma integration, and a few other elements. If you have any asks as to what else might be required in this distro, don't be a stranger, and I'll see what I can do. That said, I won't be using Leap 15.2, because it just isn't stable and robust enough for me. Sad face. All right, that would be all for now.

  • Providing KDE software updates from git for fun and profit in openSUSE | dennogumi.org

    Yes, today I’m going to talk about the OBS, that is the Open Build Service, not to be confused with another highly successful open source project.

    As you know, since ages, the openSUSE KDE team provides a series of repositories which track the latest state of the git repositories in KDE, be them either Frameworks, Plasma, or the applications part of the Release Service. This also allows to create Live CDs which can be useful for testing out the software.

    But the question that I’ve seen every now and then is… how it is actually done? Is everything provided by the OBS, or does someone need to add some glue on top of that?

  • Refreshed look | dennogumi.org

    More recently, I’ve been reading about Hugo, a rather fast static site generator which also happens to be packaged for openSUSE. In particular I found the approach to theming better than Jekyll, because you can just override parts of a theme should you require it, instead of forking a whole theme and hope for the best.

    Thus, I used the Ananke theme with some extra additions (documented in the git repository). Importing things was pretty painless. The CSS wasn’t, and I’m sure there are still loads of broken things, but at least I’m moving forward. Please leave a comment if you find anything broken, thanks!

    Hopefully I can blog a little more than just making an update and disappearing again (not that I’ve disappeared: I’ve been fairly active doing packaging work in openSUSE). But again, to quote the words of Merlin, “it is a secret only known to the ancient gods and me.”

  • November/December in KDE PIM

    Following Kévin it’s my turn to show you what happened around Kontact in the previous two months. More than 30 people contributed about 1200 changes in that time, we had a new major release in early December and there’s a virtual New Year meetup on Saturday!

openSUSE Tumbleweed on the Banana Pi BPI-M2 ZERO

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SUSE

I recently got myself a Banana Pi M2 Zero board while ordering other stuff at an electronics distributor. The M2 zero is the same form factor and feature set as the Raspberry Pi Zero W (the GPIO pin headers are said to be compatible, it has WiFi and Bluetooth built in and an USB OTG port). The CPU is an Allwinner H2+, a quad-core ARM processor running a 1GHz clock speed, RAM size is 512MB. Processing power is probably comparable to a Raspberry Pi 2 board.

I bought the M2 Zero to use it with an RTLSDR stick to receive the signal of my outside RF temperature sensor. This worked with the Raspberry Pi Zero W, but was a bit too much for the slower CPU which has other more important things to do anyway (playing internet radio Wink, so the M2 Zero was a cheap, more powerful alternative. The box will be running headless and thus I do not care about support for graphics and multimedia anyway.

In the end, I switched the RF receiver to a RaspyRFM board whih is using less energy and simpler to use than an RTLSDR stick just to receive some sensors and now the M2 Zero board is free for tinkering...

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Also: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/53

openSUSE community elects Axel, Gertjan and Neal to serve on the Board

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SUSE

The complete election results are:

Axel Braun — 142 votes
Gertjan Lettink — 134 votes
Neal Gompa — 131 votes
Maurizio Galli — 103 votes
Nathan Wolf — 59 votes

Five votes were recorded for the "none of the above" option. Out of 518 eligible voters, 229 voters have cast their vote in this election, which represents a turnout of 44%. It's a low turnout compared to last year's board election which was 56%.

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OpenSUSE Leap 15.2 Review, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Review of the Week and More

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Reviews
SUSE
  • OpenSUSE Leap 15.2 review

    For many years, SUSE - and openSUSE - has been my daily driver, my favorite Linux distro. It had everything one could expect - speed, stability, professional edge, top-end tooling. And then, one day, it simply stopped being awesome. I've been trying to rekindle that first Tux love ever since. Without luck.

    You can read all about my past openSUSE endeavors by reading my last review and working your way into the past, up the hill of enthusiasm and happiness. In fact, my overall Linux desktop experience has been going down for quite some time, and recently, I've decided to do my reviews short and sweet. Well, not having touched openSUSE for quite some time, I wanted to check Leap 15.2 again, to see what gives. Can I haz the old fun back?

    [...]

    This was longer than I anticipated - or warranted. Call it my nostalgic infatuation with openSUSE. It pains me to say, but openSUSE Leap 15.2 isn't any friendlier or smarter than many of its previous versions. In fact, it's pretty nerdy and largely inaccessible to ordinary folks, despite some rather brilliant elements in its design. But you cannot reconcile those with a fundamentally broken package management, missing day-to-day software and fun bits, and tons of visual and ergonomic inconsistencies.

    The installer is no longer as safe and intelligent as it used to be. Everything is a bit less. Such a shame. Because YaST is cool, and SUSE utilities are generally top-notch and pro. But then, there's a clash between what should be a desktop for ordinary people and an enterprise sysadmin frontend, in a way. Kind of between what you get with default CentOS and CentOS plus all my gravy and changes. Well, sad but hardly surprising. Maybe one day. That said, much like my Fedora 33 review, I will have a separate post-install tweaks guide, for those who do want to use openSUSE Leap as their desktop machine. Given my experience, I can't recommend it, and it joins a long list of painful memories in my Tux journey.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/52

    Xmas is upon us – at least in some areas of the world. This means quitea lot of people are away from their computers and the number of submissions is getting a bit lower. Tumbleweed is not stopping though – it just rolls at the pace contributors create submissions. For week 2020/52 this means a total of 3 snapshots that were published. Saddest of this all is that the new kernel 5.10 is not behaving very nicely when the iwlwifi module is being loaded.

  • Christmastime in the year 2020 | Holiday Blathering

    There have been a lot of great developments in the open source world, it seems like software packages rolling down on openSUSE Tumbleweed have just been rock-solid. KDE Plasma 5.20 has been an incredible joy to have on all my machines. If you have a touch screen, the interface controls are top-notch. I learned of a replacement shell called FISH which may very well be the neatest terminal based tool I have ever used. I am truly thankful for all the hard work put in by so many people to make life on the computer more enjoyable and productive.

    I have been able to continue to enjoy my time with the Destination Linux Network where I can make a positive contribution to the community on a regular basis. I have been able to meet some incredible people with such incredible knowledge and seemingly endless patience. I have been able to learn so many new and interesting things because of the interactions and I am forever grateful.

SUSE/OpenSUSE: The Rancher Deal and Result of the Modernizing AutoYaST initiative

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SUSE
  • Rancher Deal May Make SUSE a Kubernetes and Hybrid Cloud Powerhouse | Data Center Knowledge

    After years of struggling to catch up, the German open source software firm buys what might be the ticket to finally turning around.

  • Result of the Modernizing AutoYaST initiative

    In April, we announced the Modernizing AutoYaST initiative. The idea was not to rewrite AutoYaST but just introduce a few new features, remove some limitations and improve the code quality.

    Although they were not set in stone, we had some ideas about what changes we wanted to introduce. However, as soon as we started to work, it became clear that we needed to adapt our roadmap. So if you compare our initial announcement with the result, you can spot many differences.

    This article describes the most relevant changes. If you want to try any of these features, they are already available in openSUSE Tumbleweed.

HP EliteBook 840 G7 running openSUSE Tumbleweed

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SUSE

I was given an incredible gift by my former employer as a parting gift, an HP EliteBook 840 G7. I didn’t unpack it right away as I wasn’t sure how I was going to integrate it into my mess of computer equipment. I have been very happy with my Dell Latitude E6440 and decided my next system was going to be a desktop system.

Bottom line up front, I am surprisingly pleased with this system. The HPs I have used in times past have been less than stellar and this machine is not at all anywhere close to the same experience. This machine is pretty great and far better than any HP I have ever used. openSUSE Tumbleweed runs fantastically well on this hardware. Setting it up was trivial and it has been a fantastic experience.

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More in Tux Machines

Devices: Xtra-PC, Arduino and Inventor Coding Kit

  • Xtra-PC Reviews – Best Linux USB-Stick? - Product Review by Rick Finn

    The Xtra-PC Linux USB-Stick might be your solution if you have problems with your old and slow PC. It's a small flash drive stick and it's using Linux OS to boost you PC's operations. Check out now.

  • Arduino Blog » Old keyboard turned into a new children’s learning toy

    Peter Turczak’s toddler son loves “technical stuff,” especially things like keyboards and computers that adults use. After discussing this with other likeminded technical parents, the idea of giving new life to an old (PS/2 or AT) keyboard as a teaching tool was hatched.

  • SiFive Helping To Teach Kids Programming With RISC-V HiFive Inventor Coding Kit

    SiFive in cooperation with Tynker and BBC Learning have launched a Doctor Who themed HiFive Inventor Coding Kit. This Initial HiFive Inventor Coding Kit is intended to help kids as young as seven years of age get involved with computer programming through a variety of fun exercises and challenges involving the RISC-V powered mini computer and related peripherals like LED lighting and speaker control. [...] So for those looking to get their kids involved with computer programming and looking for an IoT-type device with some fun sensors and various themed exercises to get them experimenting, the HiFive Inventor Coding Kit is worth looking into further. More details on the programming platform can be found via Tynker.com and on the hardware at HiFiveInventor.com. The HiFive Inventor Kit is available from Amazon.com and other Internet retailers for $75 USD.

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (atftp, coturn, gitlab, mdbook, mediawiki, nodejs, nodejs-lts-dubnium, nodejs-lts-erbium, nodejs-lts-fermium, nvidia-utils, opensmtpd, php, python-cairosvg, python-pillow, thunderbird, vivaldi, and wavpack), CentOS (firefox and thunderbird), Debian (chromium and snapd), Fedora (chromium, flatpak, glibc, kernel, kernel-headers, nodejs, php, and python-cairosvg), Mageia (bind, caribou, chromium-browser-stable, dom4j, edk2, opensc, p11-kit, policycoreutils, python-lxml, resteasy, sudo, synergy, and unzip), openSUSE (ceph, crmsh, dovecot23, hawk2, kernel, nodejs10, open-iscsi, openldap2, php7, python-jupyter_notebook, slurm_18_08, tcmu-runner, thunderbird, tomcat, viewvc, and vlc), Oracle (dotnet3.1 and thunderbird), Red Hat (postgresql:10, postgresql:12, postgresql:9.6, and xstream), SUSE (ImageMagick, openldap2, slurm, and tcmu-runner), and Ubuntu (icoutils).

  • About CVE-2020-27348

    Well this is a doozey. Made public a while back was a security vulnerability in many Snap Packages and the Snapcraft tool used to create them. Specifically, this is the vulnerability identified as CVE-2020-27348. It unfortunately affects many many snap packages… [...] The problem arises when the LD_LIBRARY_PATH includes an empty element in its list. When the Dynamic Linker sees an empty element it will look in the current working directory of the process. So if we construct our search paths with an accidental empty element the application inside our Snap Package could be caused to load a shared library from outside the Snap Package’s shipped files. This can lead to an arbitrary code execution. It has been common to put a definition of the LD_LIBRARY_PATH variable into a Snap Package’s snapcraft.yaml that references a predefined $LD_LIBRARY_PATH as if to extend it. Unfortunately, despite this being common, it was poorly understood that SnapD ensures that the $LD_LIBRARY_PATH is unset when starting a Snap Package’s applications. What that means is that where the author tried to extend the variable they have inadvertantly inserted the bad empty element. The empty element appears because $LD_LIBRARY_PATH is unset so the shell will expand it to an empty string.

  • Wait, What? Kids Found A Security Flaw in Linux Mint By Mashing Keys!

    Security flaws can be incredibly stupid and dangerous. Of course, I’m not judging anyone, we are humans after all. But this little incident is quite funny.

Audiocasts/Shows: Blender 2.91, Server Security, Linux in the Ham Shack and More

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • Davie Street Enterprises: A case study in digital transformation

    We would like to introduce you to Davie Street Enterprises (DSE). DSE is a fictitious 100-year-old multinational corporation that is beginning its digital transformation journey. In this post we will lay the groundwork for a series following DSE as an illustration of how some Red Hat customers are preparing for and succeeding at digital transformation to save money, become more efficient, and compete more effectively. The company isn't real, but its struggle is very real for many organizations. Throughout this series, we will explore the business problems any number of organizations are challenged with and how DSE, with the help of Red Hat and its partners, plan to solve those problems. To start, let’s learn more about DSE, its business, and some of the associates involved in its digital transformation journey.

  • Farewell 2020: A year of togetherness with our EMEA partners

    When reflecting on 2020, I do what many people do and think about what things were like prior to this year. For me, I immediately go back to a spring day three years ago. Red Hat was hosting our EMEA Partner Conference; a mix of distributors, independent software vendors (ISVs), system integrators and solution providers from across the region. Alongside the usual product updates and market insight sessions you might expect, we decided to do a little drumming. A lot of drumming, in fact — 900 people banging bongos and clashing cymbals. Other than the noise, what I remember was the genuine sense of togetherness; embarrassment and egos put to the side in the pursuit of the perfect tempo. It seems drumming is a good signal of solidarity. Even in a large group, it’s easy to notice someone beating to a different rhythm. Trainers and coaches use this drumming technique frequently to promote unity and coordination. Our coach that day later congratulated me on "having such a tight knit group of employees." When I told him they weren’t our employees but partners from 550 different companies, he couldn’t believe it.

  • Visualizing system performance with RHEL 8 using Performance Co-Pilot (PCP) and Grafana (Part 1)

    When it comes to performance metrics data collection and visualization on Linux, PCP metrics collection and visualization are key. Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8 provides an excellent framework for collecting performance metrics and visualizing them! The days of poring over command line output to try and figure out what is happening on a system are gone. In this series, I’d like to introduce the power of using Performance Co-Pilot (PCP) and Grafana to visualize system performance data in RHEL. By default, Performance Co-Pilot is not installed on RHEL 8. We believe in giving users choices and as such, you have to opt-in to using Performance Co-Pilot.