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SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Powered by Linux Kernel 4.9.9 and Mesa 13.0.4, Update Now

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Linux
SUSE

openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio reports today, February 16, about the latest software updates and technologies that landed in the stable repositories during last week and the beginning of this one via a total of six snapshots.

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Kurdish Group Hacks openSUSE Linux Website

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Linux
SUSE

In this day and age, you never know where you're going to run across a political statement. For example, if you visited the openSUSE News website on Monday, you would have been treated to an image of the Kurdistan flag, along with a rather potty mouthed anti-ISIS statement.

Yup. The openSUSE site had been defaced, by a hacker identifying himself as MuhmadEmad and connected with a group called "KurDish HaCk3Rs." A screenshot of the defaced site is available -- thanks to Roy Schestowitz, publisher of Tux Machines and Techrights -- but we'll not show it here due to an F-bomb in the message. The good news is that little harm seems to have been done and the site was quickly returned to normal by way of a recent backup.

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OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 Gnome - Better but not really

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Reviews
SUSE

It is time to give Leap a second chance. Let me be extra corny. Give leap a chance. Yes. Well, several weeks ago, I reviewed the Plasma edition of the latest openSUSE release, and while it was busy firing all cannon, like a typical Stormtrooper, most of the beams did not hit the target. It was a fairly mediocre distro, delivering everything but then stopping just short of the goodness mark.

I will now conduct a Gnome experiment. Load the distro with a fresh new desktop environment, and see how it behaves. We did something rather similar with CentOS recently, with some rather surprising results. Hint. Maybe we will get lucky. Let's do it.

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Also new: Tumbleweed Snapshots Bring Users New Vulkan, 4.9.7 Kernel

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get Linux 4.9.7, GCC 6.3.1, Wine 2.1, and New Vulkan

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SUSE

If you're using the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system on your personal computer, we'd like to inform you today about the latest software updates that arrived in the distro's repositories during last week and the first days of this one.

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Kurdish Hacker Posts Anti-ISIS Message on openSUSE's Website, Data Remains Safe

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SUSE

Softpedia was informed by Dr. Roy Schestowitz that the openSUSE News (news.opensuse.org) website got defaced by Kurdish hacker MuhmadEmad on the day of February 6, 2017.

It would appear that the server where the news.opensuse.org website is hosted is isolated from the rest of openSUSE's infrastructure, which means that the hacker did not have access to any contributor data, such as email and passwords, nor to the ISO images of the openSUSE Linux operating system.

We already talked with openSUSE Chairman Richard Brown, who confirms for Softpedia that the offered openSUSE downloads remain safe and consistent, and users should not worry about anything. The vigilant openSUSE devs immediately restored the news.opensuse.org website from a recent backup, so everything is operating normally at this time.

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OpenSUSE Web Site Cracked, Tumbleweed Update

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Security
Web
SUSE

New systemd, Plasma 5.9 Arrive in Tumbleweed

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SUSE

The most recent snapshot, 20170131, added several new features with KDE’s Plasma 5.9.

“In our ongoing effort to make you more productive with Plasma, we added interactive previews to our notifications,” according to the release announcement on Plasma 5.9.

Additional features like icon widgets being created for applications and document when dragged to the desktop and several other new features like streamlined visuals, global menus and a new network configuration module can be found in the newest Plasma 5.9 version.

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openSUSE Leap 42.2 Hits the Cloud, You Can Now Use It on AWS Marketplace, Azure

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SUSE

openSUSE Project, through Douglas DeMaio, proudly announced the availability of the openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system as virtual images on various popular cloud providers.

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Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" Installer RC2 Is Out, Now Supports Linux Kernel 4.9

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SUSE

Debian Project's Cyril Bruleboi is today announcing the availability of the second RC (Release Candidate) version of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" Installer system.

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An Everyday Linux User Review Of OpenSUSE Leap 42

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Linux
Reviews
SUSE

So here is the deal. If as the Everyday Linux User you are going to use openSUSE then you have to stick with it and in reality it should be the only operating system on your machine. Trying to dual boot will probably tie you up in knots.

After you have installed it and you have the most important non-free packages installed (Google Chrome being the main one) then you are likely to find openSUSE and GNOME a joy.

GNOME is really easy to use. It really is point and click and if you can get a handle on those keyboard shortcuts then life will be very easy indeed.

openSUSE is stable and it won't let you down with odd quirks that some other distributions have. It really is a case of taking that bit more time to get used to than you may have to with a Linux Mint for instance.

The good news is that there is a lot of documentation available and most things you will try have been tried before and there is usually a straight forward guide to follow to get to where you want to be.

All in all a positive experience.

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More in Tux Machines

Latvian Ventspils controls costs with open source

The administration of Ventspils, Latvia’s sixth largest city, is an avid user of free and open source software. The main benefits: cost and resource optimisation. Read more

Ubuntu Touch finds a home on a conflict-free, fair-trade, user-maintainable handset

Handset maker Fairphone is teaming up with the community project UBports, which seeks to get Ubuntu Touch on mobile devices. They will be showing off Ubuntu Touch running on the Fairphone 2 during Mobile World Congress, which starts February 27 in Barcelona. While Ubuntu is probably not the first name that comes to mind when you think of mobile devices, the phone in question offers some compelling features. “UBports Foundation will be showcasing its work at the Canonical booth, the company behind Ubuntu. Canonical is planning to tell about the latest developments around the convergence of its devices and UBports Foundation will share its mission ‘Ubuntu On Every Device’ with the visitors,” UBports said in a February 8 press release. Currently, UBports’ website lists three devices as “fully working as daily drivers:” The OnePlus One, Nexus 5, and the Fairphone 2, with the latter showing all parts as functioning with Ubuntu Touch, save the GPS radio. (Interestingly, the UBports project website for the Fairphone 2 still lists the GSM radio [in addition to the GPS] as a work in progress. However there is a video of two people talking with the handset, so it’s likely the Fairphone 2 project website is out of date.) The website also has instructions for flashing Ubuntu to the Fairphone 2. Read more

BSD Leftovers

  • LLVM/Clang 4.0 Is Running Late Due To Seven Blocker Bugs
    LLVM 4.0 was supposed to have been released by now, but it's running late due to open blocker bugs. Hans Wennborg commented on the mailing list that while the release should have happened on 21 February, serving as release manager, he hasn't tagged the release yet due to open blocker bugs.
  • FreeBSD-Based pfSense 2.3.3 Open-Source Firewall Released with over 100 Changes
    Rubicon Communications' Jim Pingle announced the availability of a new point release to the pfSense 2.3 stable series, which adds over 100 improvements and a bunch of new features. Updated to FreeBSD 10.3-RELEASE-p16, the pfSense 2.3.3 maintenance release is here more than seven months after the 2.3.2 update and introduces several new packages, including TFTP Server, LCDproc, cellular, and tinc, a lot of improvements for the OpenVPN and IPsec implementations, as well as numerous stability and security fixes from FreeBSD. Dozens of bug fixes are included in pfSense 2.3.3 for WebGUI, graphs and monitoring, gateways and routing, notifications, Dynamic DNS, captive portal, NTP and GPS, DNS, resolver and forwarder, DHCP and DHCPv6 servers, router advertisements, HA and CARP, traffic shaping, firewall, rules, NAT, aliases, states, users, authentication, and privileges.
  • “Hi, I’m jkh and I’m a d**k”
    Yesterday, I was privy to a private email message discussing a topic I care deeply about. I contacted the author and said “You really need to make this public and give this a wider audience.” His response boiled down to “if I wanted it to get a wider audience, I was welcome to do so myself.” So here’s my first ever guest post, from Jordan K Hubbard, one of the founders of the FreeBSD Project. While this discussion focuses on FreeBSD, it’s applicable to any large open source project.

Linux Graphics