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SUSE

Tumbleweed, Factory rolling releases to merge

Filed under
SUSE

“With the release of openSUSE 13.2 due in November, we realised this was a perfect opportunity to merge our two openSUSE rolling-releases together so users of Tumbleweed can benefit from the developments to our Factory development process over the last few years,” said Richard Brown, Chairman of openSUSE board. “The combined feedback and contributions from our combined Tumbleweed and Factory users should help keep openSUSE rolling forward even faster, while offering our users the latest and greatest applications on a stable rolling release.”

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Coming Attractions: Makulu, openSuSE and Fedora releases on the way

Filed under
Android
Red Hat
SUSE

Makulu Linux Cinnamon Debian Edition. Whew, that's a mouthfull, isn't it? I have said before that Makulu is my favorite distribution for the pure joy of Linux. Full of great graphics, bells and whistles galore, and overflowing with pretty much every package, application or utility you can imagine. The final release of this version is due out next Monday, 27 October, barring unexpected obstacles.

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Linux clusters in German finance ministry data centre

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
SUSE

The shared IT service centre for Germany's federal government (ZIVIT) has awarded a 10 million euro support contract for open source software, it announced on 8 October. The four-year contract was won by CGI, a large ICT service provider. The contract is for maintenance and management of a high availability Linux cluster running databases, file and network services and backups systems, used by the Federal Ministry of Finance.

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openSUSE 13.2 RC1 is now out, hands on

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SUSE

openSUSE 13.2 RC1 is baked and ready to serve!. This previous Beta release was a blast with almost 10.000 downloads. The community responded to the call and we had lot of eyes looking for bugs in openSUSE 13.2 Beta1. Many of them have been already squashed and openSUSE 13.2 Release Candidate 1 is here to prove it.

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Mark Shuttleworth, The State and Ubuntu 2.0

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SUSE

Shuttleworth’s Ubuntu is an open source software with limited proprietary components, meaning that users are encouraged to upload it, improve it, upload those improvements, and make the world—or, rather, the computer—a better place. Once, back when these things were discussed by men with nicotine-stained fingers and furtive eyes, open source promised to be the keystone in a shared economy ushered in by the digital revolution. Open source too often fell in a paradoxical grey zone—software created by a billionaire who lives on an island of money is not exactly the stuff of utopian dreams. But that shouldn’t detract from the fact that it once offered very real possibilities. Sadly, the digital revolution was thoroughly co-opted by non-visionaries like Bill Gates, a man so boring he made a fucking office out of pixels, and those who helped turn the Internet into a one-click shopping mall.

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SUSE, MariaDB and IBM team up to tame Big Data

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Server
SUSE

SUSE and MariaDB (the company formerly known as SkySQL!) officially teamed up today, joining forces with IBM Power Systems, in a partnership that promises to expand the Linux application ecosystem. According to sources at SUSE, customers will now be able to run a wider variety of applications on Power8, increasing both flexibility and choice while working within existing IT infrastructure. More options is ALWAYS a good thing!

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openSUSE 11.4 Is Now Truly, Finally Dead

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SUSE

The official support for openSUSE 11.4 officially ended back in November 2012, but the openSUSE ecosystem has things that sets it apart. One of those things is called Evergreen support. Basically, after a version of OpenSUSE reaches End of Life, the community can extend the life of the system by integrating patches and fixes long after the developers have finished with it.

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Interview with openSUSE chairman Richard Brown

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Interviews
SUSE

I’ve been using Linux since around 2003. I think my first distribution was Slackware, followed by Debian, but it wasn’t very long before I discovered SUSE and since then I’ve been hooked. I started contributing with the great ‘opening up’ of the distribution that came with the launch of the openSUSE Project in 2005. In terms of ‘upstream contributions’, I’ve contributed to GNOME, ownCloud, Spacewalk, Cobbler, and a few other projects over the years, but normally through my involvement with openSUSE. I guess you could say I’m a little ‘Geeko-centric’ that way.

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openSUSE 13.2 Beta 1 vs. Fedora Linux Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Red Hat
SUSE

With this week's openSUSE 13.2 Beta release I decided to run some benchmarks to see how the performance compares to that of Fedora Linux.

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OpenSUSE 13.2 Beta

Filed under
Server
SUSE
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More in Tux Machines

Open-Source Radeon 2D Performance Is Better With Ubuntu 14.10

While we're most often looking at the OpenGL 3D performance of the Linux graphics drivers, in the tests currently being done of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS vs. Ubuntu 14.10 are also a number of 2D graphics benchmarks. In the article today are our 2D benchmarks between Ubuntu 14.04.1 and Ubuntu 14.10 for various AMD Radeon graphics cards and it shows off significant performance improvements. Read more

Today in Techrights

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KDE With Theoretical Client-Side Decorations, Windows 10 Influence

KDE contributor and graphics designer Ken Vermette has penned an interesting series of KDE "What if..." articles where he talks about (and has some visual mock-ups) about what KDE might look like with client-side decorations along and separately if KDE were to use Windows 10 design components. Read more Also: What if… Plasma Used Launchers from Other Systems & Enviornments? (Part 1) What if… KDE Used Windows 10 Design Components?

Pondering FOSS foundations

In the case of the Document Foundation, the LibreOffice project needed an independent, solid and meritocratic entity dedicated to support it. In other terms, the OpenOffice.org community wanted to be its own boss and stop relying on corporate – or even third party – good will. If you attend the Community Track on the 31st you will be able to learn more about the Document Foundation and the other entities, but my message here is that while there is no silver bullet in these matters, forcing a community be hosted or to bend to a software vendor never works. It bends if it wants to; it goes whereever it wishes to go. In the case of the Document Foundation, independence and community rule prevailed over convenience; today the results do not need to be proven anymore. But it does not mean we hold the truth more than anybody else: we just ensured the community was in charge. Read more