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BSD

GhostBSD 11.1 Alpha

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BSD
  • GhostBSD 11.1 Enters Alpha: FreeBSD 11.1 Paired With MATE, Xfce Desktops

    While TrueOS (formerly PC-BSD) is arguably the most well known desktop variant of FreeBSD, GhostBSD has been gaining ground as well as a FreeBSD-based desktop-friendly operating system. Today marks the availability of GhostBSD 11.1 Alpha.

  • GhostBSD 11.1 ALPHA1 is ready!

    This first alpha development release of GhostBSD 11.1 is ready for testing. All MATE and XFCE image is available with i386 and amd64 architectures. We hope to see a lot of people helping to test this next release.

BSD: openbsd and kcollect in DragonFly

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BSD
  • openbsd changes of note 626
  • kcollect description
  • New mechanism: kcollect

    There’s a new facility in DragonFly: kcollect(8). It holds automatically-collected kernel data for about the last day, and can output to gnuplot. Note the automatic collection part; your system will always be able to tell you about weirdness – assuming that weirdness extends to one of the features kcollect tracks.

BSD: Contributing to FreeBSD and Release of DragonFlyBSD 4.8.1

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BSD
  • Contributing to FreeBSD

     

    The FreeBSD Testing Project is building an automated test suite for the entire operating system. They have a whole mess of work to do. There’s only four people on the team, so each additional person that contributes can have a serious impact. They have tutorials on how to write tests, and sample tests.

  • DragonFlyBSD 4.8.1 Released, Updates Intel DRM Against Linux 4.7.10

    DragonFlyBSD 4.8.1 has been released by Justin Sherrill with various minor updates -- particularly for Intel DRM graphics and other kernel improvements -- over the recent v4.8 milestone.

BSD: OPNsense 17.7, OpenBSD and LLVM

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BSD

OPNsense 17.7 released

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BSD

For more than two and a half years now, OPNsense is driving innovation through modularising and hardening the open source firewall, with simple and reliable firmware upgrades, multi-language support, HardenedBSD security, fast adoption of upstream software updates as well as clear and stable 2-Clause BSD licensing.

We are writing to you today to announce the final release of version 17.7 “Free Fox”, which, over the course of the last 6 months, includes highlights such as SafeStack application hardening, the Realtek re(4) driver for better network stability, a Quagga plugin with broad routing protocol support and the Unbound resolver as the new default. Additionally, translations for Czech, Chinese, Japanese, Portuguese and German have been completed for the first time during this development cycle.

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BSD/UNIX: Trying OpenIndiana Hipster On The Core i9 7900X and 'End' of Bitrig

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BSD
  • Trying OpenIndiana Hipster On The Core i9 7900X

    Following the Linux and BSD multi-threaded tests on the Intel Core i9 7900X, I next decided to try this system with the Solaris-based OpenIndiana. Sadly, it didn't end well.

    With various BSDs working fine on the Core i9 7900X box paired with the NVMe storage, MSI X299 SLI PLUS motherboard, etc, I figured OpenIndiana would play fine. Sadly, I was wrong.

  • Bitrig: The Short-Lived OpenBSD Fork

    Bitrig, the operating system that forked OpenBSD back in 2012, is no longer being developed.

    Bitrig saw its initial release in 2014 but it's been relatively quiet since. In fact, pretty much forgotten on my end until seeing an LLVM commit this week mentioning Bitrig is dead and has been merged back into OpenBSD.

    Further showing the project is no more is the GitHub project area showing no more work since 2016.

BSD: TrueOS and OpenBSD mandoc

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BSD
  • Milestone Complete! OpenRC conversion

    The OpenRC conversion project is done! Over one thousand script/port conversions are complete, and all will be available in the TrueOS UNSTABLE and STABLE tracks soon. The project wants to extend a huge thank you to all those who contributed to completing this milestone, and a special thank you to contributors ZackaryWelch and elarge011 for doing the lion’s share of the work.

  • TrueOS Finishes Porting Scripts To OpenRC

    The TrueOS BSD distribution has finished porting over more than one thousand FreeBSD RC scripts into OpenRC format for this dependency-based init system.

    This year the TrueOS crew has been working on migrating to the OpenRC init system for better boot performance, easier configuration, better organization of configuration files, more reliable service status, etc. Popular services had been in OpenRC form already but now they have finished porting over more than 1,000 other scripts for OpenRC on TrueOS.

  • mandoc-1.14.2 released

     

    With the improved mandoc features, only twenty-five out of the ten thousand software packages in the OpenBSD ports tree still need groff to format their manual pages.

FreeBSD 11.1 Released

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BSD
  • FreeBSD 11.1 Operating System Debuts to Support 2nd Generation Microsoft Hyper-V

    The FreeBSD Project announced today the release and immediate availability of the first incremental update to the FreeBSD 11 operating system series, FreeBSD 11.1.

    It's been more than nine months since FreeBSD 11 was released as the latest and most advanced version of the widely-used and most popular BSD operating system on the market, and now, FreeBSD 11.1 is here with a bunch of new features across multiple components, as well as all the latest security and bug fixes.

  • FreeBSD 11.1 Debuts With LLVM/Clang 4, ZFS Improvements

    FreeBSD 11.1 is now available as the first point release to FreeBSD 11.

  • FreeBSD 11.1-RELEASE Announcement

    The FreeBSD Release Engineering Team is pleased to announce the availability of FreeBSD 11.1-RELEASE. This is the second release of the stable/11 branch.

BSD and Programming: OpenBSD, Development Style, and GCC/C++

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Development
GNU
BSD
  • OpenBSD kernel address randomized link

    A less than two-month-old project for OpenBSD, kernel address space randomized link (KARL), has turned the kernel into an object that is randomized on every boot. Instead of the code being stored in the same location for every boot of a given kernel, each boot will be unique. Unlike Linux's kernel address space layout randomization (KASLR), which randomizes the base address for all of the kernel code on each boot, KARL individually randomizes the object files that get linked into the binary. That means that a single information leak of a function address from the kernel does not leak information about the location of all other functions.

    Theo de Raadt first posted about the idea on the OpenBSD tech mailing list on May 30. He described the current layout of the OpenBSD kernel code, which is effectively the boot code and assembly runtime (in locore.o), followed by the kernel .o files in a fixed order. His post had some changes that would split out the assembly runtime from locore.o and link it and all of the kernel .o files in a random order. The only piece that would be placed at a known address would be locore.o; it would be followed by a randomly sized gap, then by the kernel text that has its .o files arranged in a random order. There would also be random gaps before other sections (i.e. .rodata, .data, and .bss) that are placed after the kernel text.

  • openbsd changes of note 625
  • moving to https

     

    There is some security benefit, of course, but really it’s all about the speed. I want flak to be as fast as possible, thus we need to be using the fastest protocol.  

  • Stop writing code like we're in the '90s: a practical approach (PART Sleepy

    A lot of criticisms come from users that probably wrote Java code when it was born.

  • GCC Begins Preparing For C++20 With -std=c++2a

pfSense 2.3.4-p1 Open-Source Firewall Update Brings Security Fixes for OpenVPN

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BSD

A new security and bug fix maintenance update just landed today for the pfSense 2.3.4 stable release of the open-source and free firewall distribution based on the FreeBSD technologies.

The pfSense 2.3.4-p1 patch is being released two and a half months after the launch of pfSense 2.3.4, and it looks like it attempts to inject new security fixes in pfSense and several of its components, including OpenVPN, as well as to fix various bugs that have been reported during this time. For example, it fixes Hover Dynamic DNS updates to be able to verify the SSL peer.

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More in Tux Machines

AV Linux 2018.4.12, Zenwalk Current-180419, Ubuntu MATE 18.04

Progress on Plasma Wayland for 5.13

In February after Plasma 5.12 was released we held a meeting on how we want to improve Wayland support in Plasma 5.13. Since its beta is now less than one month away it is time for a status report on what has been achieved and what we still plan to work on. Also today started a week-long Plasma Sprint in Berlin, what will hopefully accelerate the Wayland work for 5.13. So in order to kick-start the sprint this is a good opportunity to sum up where we stand now. Read more

First set of Bionic (sort-of) RC images for 18.04.

Adam Conrad of the Ubuntu Release Team is pleased to announce the first set of Bionic RC images for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. Over the next couple of hours, builds for Bionic Final should be added to the tracker[1] for all flavours. The builds have some intentional omissions, but please do test them anyway. Known issues that will be addressed Sunday/Monday: – Volume label still set to Beta – base-files still not the final version – kernel will have (at least) one more revision Despite the above, please, please, please test your images. Do not wait for a “final” build to test, as that guarantees your final build will be broken. We need you testing now, iterating uploads to get your bugs fixed, filing bugs and escalating where you need help. Again: DO NOT DELAY, TEST NOW, FIX BUGS, FILE BUGS, ESCALATE FOR HELP. Happy testing everyone, and here’s hoping we push out another smooth and stress-free release on Thursday. … Adam Conrad Read more

Collaboration Events: Pakistan Open Source Summit, GNOME+Rust Hackfest, DataworksSummit Berlin

  • Pakistan Open Source Summit 2018 concludes [Ed: Not about software]
    A large number of attendees from industry, academia, government, and students participated in the summit. Portuguese Ambassador to Pakistan Dr Joao Sabido Costa was the chief guest at the opening ceremony while former Naval Chief Admiral (r) Asif Sandila graced the occasion as the chief guest at the closing ceremony.
  • ‘Open Summit key to create industry-academy linkages’
    Ambassador of Portugal to Pakistan Dr Joao Sabido Costa has said that events such as the Open Source Summit are excellent for spreading awareness and for creating industry-academia linkages and enhancement of the information technology. He stated this while addressing a concluding ceremony of the two-day informative ‘Pakistan Open Source Summit 2018’ attended by large number of people from industry, academia, government and students. Former naval chief Admiral (R) Asif Sandila co-chaired the concluding session. Dr Joao Sabido Costa said that the organisations should utilise open source platforms to build their IT infrastructures in future. To build open source culture in Pakistan, he recommended roadmap with future activities and timelines for spreading open source.
  • Madrid GNOME+Rust Hackfest, part 2
    Yesterday we went to the Madrid Rust Meetup, a regular meeting of rustaceans here. Martin talked about WebRender; I talked about refactoring C to port it to Rust, and then Alex talked about Rust's plans for 2018. Fun times.
  • DataworksSummit Berlin - Wednesday morning
    Data strategy - cloud strategy - business strategy: Aligning the three was one of the main themes (initially put forward in his opening keynote by CTO of Hortonworks Scott Gnau) thoughout this weeks Dataworks Summit Berlin kindly organised and hosted by Hortonworks. The event was attended by over 1000 attendees joining from 51 countries. The inspiration hat was put forward in the first keynote by Scott was to take a closer look at the data lifecycle - including the fact that a lot of data is being created (and made available) outside the control of those using it: Smart farming users are using a combination of weather data, information on soil conditions gathered through sensors out in the field in order to inform daily decisions. Manufacturing is moving towards closer monitoring of production lines to spot inefficiencies. Cities are starting to deploy systems that allow for better integration of public services. UX is being optimized through extensive automation.