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BSD

BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD
  • The Importance of Bell Labs Unix

    Unix was first developed by Ken Thompson in the summer of 1969 on the DEC PDP-7 minicomputer. By 1979 Unix version 7 was making the rounds at universities all over the world. Bell Labs Unix has enormous importance: It was the basis for many operating systems that followed including BSD, and the template for Minix and Linux.

  • Lumina Desktop 1.0.0 released
  • Version 1.0.0 Released

    After roughly four years of development, I am pleased to announce the first official release of the Lumina desktop environment! This release is an incredible realization of the initial idea of Lumina – a simple and unobtrusive desktop environment meant for users to configure to match their individual needs. I hope you all enjoy it, and I look forward to working with all of you on the next iterations of this desktop!

  • Lumina Desktop 1.0 Released

Steam and KDE on FreeBSD

Filed under
KDE
BSD
Gaming
  • Script Makes It Easy To Deploy Steam On FreeBSD

    With a new script, it's possible to get Valve's Steam Linux game client running relatively well on FreeBSD.

    On FreeBSD in conjunction with its Linux binary compatibility layer it's possible to run Steam for handling your favorite Steam Linux titles. If you are unfamiliar with FreeBSD's Linux compatibility layer, see FreeBSD: A Faster Platform For Linux Gaming Than Linux?. That article has background information along with some Linux vs. FreeBSD gaming benchmarks I did five years ago... When FreeBSD 11.0 is out, I'll try again to get it working to see how FreeBSD 11 performs for running Linux native games.

  • Time flies for FBSD updates, too

    The older KDE stuff — that is, KDE4, which is still the current official release for the desktop on FreeBSD — is also maintained, although (obviously) not much changes there. We did run into a neat C++-exceptions bug recently, which was kind of hard to trigger: running k3b (or ksoundconverter and some other similar ones) with a CD that is unknown to MusicBrainz would crash k3b. There’s not that many commercially-available CDs unknown to that database, so I initially brushed off the bug report as Works For Me.

DragonFlyBSD 4.6 vs. Linux Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD

With DragonFlyBSD 4.6 having been released this week, here are benchmarks comparing its performance to that of the previous DragonFlyBSD 4.4 release as well as seeing how it compares to some Linux distributions.

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DragonFly 4.6

Filed under
BSD
  • DragonFly 4.6 released

    DragonFly version 4.6 brings brings more updates to accelerated video for both i915 and radeon users, home-grown support for NVMe controllers, preliminary EFI support, improvements in SMP and networking performance under heavy load, and a full range of binary packages.

  • DragonFly BSD 4.6.0 Launches with Home-Grown Support for NVMe Controllers

    Today, August 2, 2016, the development team behind the BSD kernel-based DragonFly BSD operating system proudly announced the official availability of the DragonFly BSD 4.6.0 update.

    DragonFly BSD 4.6.0 appears to be a major release that ends the development of the 4.4 series of the acclaimed BSD distribution and promises to introduce lots of goodies to users of this computer OS. Prominent features include initial UEFI support, in-house built support for NVMe SSD devices, as well as SMP and networking improvements.

  • DragonFlyBSD 4.6 Rolls Out NVMe Support, Better SMP Performance

OpenSSH 7.3 Released

Filed under
Software
BSD
  • OpenSSH 7.3 Released, Adds ProxyJump & IdentityAgent Options

    OpenSSH 7.3 was released today by the OpenBSD camp with some security fixes while also providing a few new options and other features.

  • OpenSSH 7.3 released

    OpenSSH is a 100% complete SSH protocol 2.0 implementation and includes sftp client and server support. OpenSSH also includes transitional support for the legacy SSH 1.3 and 1.5 protocols that may be enabled at compile-time.

  • OpenSSH 7.3

    OpenSSH 7.3 has just been released. It will be available from the mirrors listed at http://www.openssh.com/ shortly.

FreeBSD 11.0 Beta 3

Filed under
BSD
  • FreeBSD 11.0-BETA3 Now Available
  • FreeBSD 11.0 Beta 3 Out Now, Final Release Is Expected to Land on September 2

    FreeBSD Project's Glen Barber announced the availability of the third Beta milestone towards the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 operating system for public beta testing.

    Delayed one day, the FreeBSD 11.0 Beta 3 release is the last one for this development cycle, and it promises to squash even more of those annoying issues that have been reported by users since the first and second Beta milestones. Among the changes, we can mention improvements to the libunwind library, and updated locales.

  • Myths about FreeBSD [Ed: last edited this weekend.]

OPNsense 16.7

Filed under
Security
BSD
  • OPNsense 16.7 released
  • pfSense/m0n0wall-Forked OPNsense 16.7 Released

    The latest major release is out of OPNsense, a BSD open-source firewall OS project derived from pfSense and m0n0wall.

    OPNsense 16.7 brings NetFlow-based reporting and export, trafic shaping support, two-factor authentication, HTTPS and ICAP support in the proxy server, and UEFI boot and installation modes.

BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD
  • FreeBSD Q2'2016: EFI Improvements, Prepping For FreeBSD 11.0, Package Updates

    For FreeBSD fans not closely following its development on a daily basis, the FreeBSD project has released their Q2'2016 quarterly status report that covers various activities going on around this BSD operating system project.

  • EuroBSDCon 2016 schedule has been released

    The EuroBSDCon 2016 talks and schedule have been released, and oh are we in for a treat!

    All three major BSD's have a "how we made the network go fast" talk, nearly every single timeslot has a networking related talk, and most of the non-networking talks look fantastic as well.

pfSense 2.3.2 Open Source BSD Firewall Distro Arrives with over 70 Improvements

Filed under
Security
BSD

Electric Sheep Fencing LLC, through Chris Buechler, proudly announced on July 25, 2016, the immediate availability for download of the second maintenance update aimed at the pfSense 2.3 series of the FreeBSD-based open-source firewall distribution.

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OpenBSD 6.0 to be released September 1, 2016

Filed under
BSD

Theo de Raadt (deraadt@) has updated the (in-progress) OpenBSD 6.0 release page to indicate that release will occur earlier than is usual...

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Android Leftovers

  • Pimp your smartphone with the latest Android O Pixel launcher
    If your device is running Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow or above, you can now pimp it out with the latest Google O Pixel launcher. One of the contributors on the XDA Developers forum has recently posted the APK file, which you can install on your smartphone. Before you download the file, make sure your device can install apps that aren’t listed on the Play Store. To do so, open up the Settings menu, tap on Security, and enable the “Unknown sources” option. Once that’s done, all you have to do is download the file and then tap on it in the notification shade to install the launcher on your device.
  • Google is killing off Android's emoji blobs
    The best emojis on the market are no more: Google’s weird blobs are being retired in favour of more conventional circular yellow faces.
  • Google I/O: What about Android on Chrome OS?
    The hottest tech-show ticket these days is Google I/O. In the just-finished 2017 conference, Google announced lots of great stuff, including a lightweight version of Android, Android Go; a first look at the next version of Android, Android O; and a major upgrade to Google Home. One thing that was noticeably missing, however: big news about Android apps on Chrome OS.
  • RaspAnd Marshmallow 6.0.1 Android OS Now Available for Raspberry Pi 3 and 2 SBCs
    After informing us about the availability of a new build of his RaspAnd Nougat operating system for Raspberry Pi 3 and 2 SBCs based on Android 7.1.2, Arne Exton released an updated RaspAnd Marshmallow 6 version.

today's howtos

LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of The Week - Deepin OS

​Depth/Deepin OS is not just another Linux Distro, but one with something new to show. Deepin OS is simply speaking, just beautiful. Deepin OS, formerly known as Deepin, Linux Deepin, and Hiweed GNU/Linux is a Linux distro with an identity crisis. Seriously, this distro has undergone name changes you always have to check twice if the name is still the same. And that is all the negative you are going to say about this distro. Honestly speaking, Deepin OS is surely going to blow you away. I have been keeping an eye on this distro since 2013 and it still manages to impress me. Read more

KDE Leftovers: digikam, KDevelop, Kate, GSoC, and Akademy

  • [digikam] Call to Test the Pre-Release of 5.6.0
    Once again a lot has been going on behind the scenes since the last release. The HTML gallery tool is back, database shrinking (e.g. purging stale thumbnails) is also supported on MySQL, grouping has been improved and additional sidecars can now be specified. Therefore the release of 5.6.0 will be (is already) delayed, as we would like to invite you to test all these features. As usual they are available in the pre-release bundles or obviously directly from the git repository. Please report any dysfunctions, unexpected behaviour or suggestions for improvement to our bug tracker.
  • KDevelop runtimes: Docker and Flatpak integration
    On my last blog post I discussed about how some assumptions such as the platform developed on can affect our development. We need to minimize it by empowering the developers with good tools so that they can develop properly. To that end, I introduced runtimes in our IDE to abstract platforms (much like on Gnome’s Builder or Qt Creator).
  • Kate 17.04.1 available for Windows
  • GSoC - Community Bonding Period with Krita
  • First month report: my feelings about gsoc
  • My Akademy Plans
    The Akademy programme (saturday, sunday) is actually pretty long; the conference days stretch into feels-like-evening to me. Of course, the Dutch are infamous for being “6pm at the dinner table, and eat potatoes” so my notion of evening may not match what works on the Mediterranean coast. Actually, I know it doesn’t since way back when at a Ubuntu Developer Summit in Sevilla it took some internal-clock-resetting to adjust to dinner closer to midnight than 18:00.