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BSD

Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD

LLVM News

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Development
BSD
  • GCC 6.2/7.0 vs. LLVM Clang 3.9/4.0 SVN Compiler Performance

    Earlier this week I published some GCC 5.4 vs. GCC 6.2 vs. GCC 7.0 SVN development benchmarks with a Core i7 6800K Broadwell-E system. For those curious how the LLVM Clang compiler stack is comparing, here are some tests on the same system when running fresh benchmarks of LLVM Clang 3.9 as well as LLVM Clang 4.0 SVN.

    These tests were done with LLVM Clang 3.9 and 4.0 SVN added in to the GCC results from this Core i7 6800K system running Ubuntu 16.10 with the Linux 4.8 kernel. The CFLAGS/CXXFLAGS were maintained the same throughout all testing with the "-O3 -march=native" flags.

  • LLVM 3.9.1 Expected For Release Next Week

    While LLVM 4.0 isn't coming until its planned release in Feburary, the LLVM 3.9.1 point release is expected this coming week.

    Tom Stellard of AMD released LLVM 3.9.1-rc3 on Friday and anticipates this being the last release candidate. This 3.9.1-rc3 build just has some ARM/AArch64 fixes compared to his earlier RC2 milestone.

Linux Distributions vs. BSDs With netperf & iperf3 Network Performance

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD

With now having netperf in the Phoronix Test Suite as well as iperf3 for the latest open-source benchmarks in our automated cross-platform benchmarking framework, I couldn't help but to run some networking benchmarks on a system when trying out a few different Linux distributions and BSDs to see how the performance compares. The operating systems ran with these networking benchmarks included Debian 8.6, Ubuntu 16.10, Clear Linux 12020, CentOS 7, and Fedora 25. The BSDs tested for this comparison were FreeBSD 11.0 and DragonFlyBSD 4.6.1.

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BSD Leftovers: OpenBSD and FreeNAS (FreeBSD)

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BSD
  • openbsd changes of note 2

    Things happened, stuff changed.

    X550 support among other ix changes and cleanup.

    Ongoing switch work. Better OpenFlow compat. You know it’s serious when tcpdump gets an update.

    Loongson 3A support.

    [...]

  • FreeNAS 10, World’s Most Popular Software-Defined Storage OS, Gets New Beta

    The day of November 23, 2016, brought us the second Beta development release of the upcoming FreeNAS 10 open-source storage NAS (Network Attached Storage) operating system based on FreeBSD, just in time for the Thanksgiving holiday.

    FreeNAS 10 Beta 2 comes almost three months after the first Beta milestone, and the devs are proud to say that the upcoming operating system, which will be a total rewrite, is now feature complete, and there are many GUI enhancements for the Dashboard, Volume UI, Accounts, System, Services, Networking, Calendar, Console, and Peering. Also, it looks like feature-parity with the FreeNAS 9.10 is in place now.

NAS4Free 11 BSD-Based Open Source Storage NAS Distribution Officially Released

Filed under
OSS
BSD

On November 20, 2016, the development team behind the open-source, FreeBSD-based storage NAS (Network-Attached Storage) distribution promoted the NAS4Free 11 series to the stable channel.

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TrueOS Succeeds PC-BSD Desktop-Friendly Unix OS

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BSD

The FreeBSD Unix operating system is one of the earliest open-source operating system projects, and it continues to be actively developed. The most recent update is the FreeBSD 11 release, which debuted Oct. 10. While FreeBSD is a robust operating system, it is not a desktop focused platform, which is where the PC-BSD operating system, based on FreeBSD used to fit in. On Sept. 1, PC-BSD was re-branded as TrueOS, providing FreeBSD users with an easy-to-use desktop as well as a new release cadence. In the past, PC-BSD releases followed FreeBSD milestones, providing users with code that had already been included in a generally available release. With TrueOS, the release model is now moving to what is known as a rolling release, with packages constantly being updated as they become available. As such, TrueOS is not based on the recently released FreeBSD 11; instead, it is based on the FreeBSD "current" branch that is the leading edge of the operating system development. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at the new TrueOS operating system and what it offers desktop users.

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FreeBSD 11.0 Reviewed

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Reviews
BSD

There were definitely some attractive features in FreeBSD 11.0. I especially enjoyed the changes to the system installer. The ability to set up UFS and ZFS through a series of guided steps was a welcome feature. I also really appreciate that the installer will allow us to enable certain security features like PID randomization and hiding the processes of other users. Linux distributions allow the administrator to set these options, but they often require digging through documentation and setting cryptic variables from the command line. FreeBSD makes enabling these features as straight forward as checking a box during the initial installation.

I also like how pkg has progressed. I think it has become faster in the past year or two and handled dependencies better than it did when the new package manager was introduced. In addition, FreeBSD's documentation is as good as ever, though I feel it has become more scattered. There were times I would find what I wanted in the Handbook, but other times I had to switch to the wiki or dig through a man page. The information is out there, but it can take some searching to find.

Other aspects of running FreeBSD were more disappointing. For example, I had hoped to find boot environments working and accessible from the boot menu. However, progress seems to have reversed in this area as switching boot environments prevented the system from loading. There were some other issues, for example I was unable to login from the graphical login screen, but I could access the Lumina desktop by signing into my account from the command line and launching an X session.

Hardware was a weak point in my experiment. FreeBSD did not work on my desktop machine at all in BIOS mode and failed to boot from installation media in UEFI mode. When running in a VirtualBox environment, the operating system did much better. FreeBSD was able to boot, play sound and run smoothly, but screen resolution was limited, even after VirtualBox modules had been installed and enabled.

Perhaps my biggest concern though while using FreeBSD 11.0 was that I could not update the base operating system, meaning it would be difficult to keep the system patched against security updates. Even once I had manually created a /boot directory to fix the boot environment creation issue, freebsd-update and freebsd-version continued to fail to detect the running kernel. This leaves the system vulnerable and means our best chance for keeping up with security updates is to manually install them from source code, not an ideal situation.

All in all, FreeBSD 11.0 does have some interesting new features, but it also has several bugs which make me want to hold off on using the operating system until a point release has been made available to fix the existing issues.

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NetBSD 7.0.2 Operating System Officially Released, Available for Download Now

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BSD

On October 27, 2016, NetBSD Project, through Soren Jacobsen, proudly announced the release and general availability of the second maintenance update to the NetBSD 7.0 operating system.

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Lumina Desktop 1.1 Released

Filed under
BSD

The BSD-focused, Qt-powered Lumina Desktop Environment is out with its version 1.1 update.

The developers behind the Lumina Desktop Environment consider it a "significant update" with both new and reworked utilities, infrastructure improvements, and other enhancements.

Lumina 1.1 adds a pure Qt5 calculator, text editor improvements, the file manager has been completely overhauled, system application list management is much improved, and there is a range of other improvements.

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FreeBSD 11

Filed under
BSD
  • FreeBSD 11
  • FreeBSD 11.0-RELEASE Announcement
  • FreeBSD Takes Open Source to 11 with Latest Release

    October 10, 2016, Boulder, CO. – The FreeBSD Project, in conjunction with the FreeBSD Foundation, is pleased to announce the release of the much anticipated FreeBSD 11.0. The latest release continues to pioneer the field of copyfree-licensed, open source operating systems by including new architecture support, performance improvements, toolchain enhancements and support for contemporary wireless chipsets. The new features and improvements bring about an even more robust operating system that both companies and end users alike benefit greatly from using.

  • Bodhi 4.0 Beta Ships with Number of Improvements

    FreeBSD 11.0 was also released today for those who think Linux is just too dang easy. The announcement said this is the first release in the stable 11.0 branch. Some of the listed highlights include:

    * OpenSSH DSA key generation has been disabled by default.
    * Wireless support for 802.11n has been added
    * ifconfig(8) utility will set the default regulatory domain to FCC on wireless interfaces
    * Up to 40% improvement in performance
    * Support for the AArch64 (arm64) and RISC-V architectures
    * Native graphics support has been added to the bhyve(8) hypervisor
    * Support for Raspberry Pi, Raspberry Pi 2 and Beaglebone Black peripherals

    Version 11 also features GNOME 3.18.4, LibreOffice 5.0.6, NVIDIA 346.96, Xorg X Server 1.17.4, GCC 4.8.5, GIMP 2.8.1.8, and Firefox 47.0.1. See the release announcement for download information.

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More in Tux Machines

Servers: Microservice, Clear Linux/Containers, Spaceborne Computer

  • Microservice architecture takes a whole new approach to infrastructure
    With services like Netflix, Uber, YouTube, and Facebook, most people are used to apps that respond quickly, work efficiently, and are updated regularly. Patience is no longer a virtue, and thanks to apps like the ones mentioned above, when people use applications, they expect blistering speeds and uninterrupted service. If you do not provide that, users aren’t exactly starved for choice; it takes less than a minute to delete an app and download something else as a replacement.
  • Clear Linux Project Announces the Next Generation of Intel's Clear Containers
    Intel's Clear Linux and Clear Containers teams are happy to introduce the next-generation of Intel's Clear Containers project, version 3.0, which bring many important new features and performance improvements. Rewritten in the Go language, Intel Clear Containers 3.0 introduces support for leveraging code used for namespace-based containers and better integrates into the container ecosystem, allowing support for Docker container engine and Kubernetes. It also improves the compatibility with the POSIX family of standards. "Today’s release presents a generational and architectural shift to utilize virtcontainers, a modular and hypervisor agnostic library for hardware virtualized containers. Clear Containers 3.0 is written in Go language and boasts an OCI compatible runtime implementation (cc-runtime) that works both on top of virtcontainers, and as a platform for deployment," said Amy L Leeland, Technical Program Manager, Intel Corporation.
  • “Spaceborne” Linux Supercomputer Starts Running In Space, Achieves 1 Teraflop Speed
    About one month ago, the HPE’s Spaceborne Computer was launched into the space using SpaceX Dragon Spacecraft. This beast was launched as a result of a partnership between Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) and NASA to find out how high-performance computers perform in space. Now, this supercomputer is fully installed and operational in ISS. The performance experiment will be carried out for one year, which is roughly the time it will take for a spacecraft to travel to Mars. At the moment, lots of calculations for space research projects are carried out on Earth, but this brings in an unavoidable factor of latency.

System76's Pop!_OS Linux to Get a Beta Release Next Week with HiDPI Improvements

System76 is getting ready to unleash the first Beta release of their upcoming Pop!_OS Linux distribution, which should be available to download next week based on the Ubuntu 17.10 Final Beta. It appears that System76's development team recently dropped focus on the Pop!_OS Installer, which they develop in collaboration with the elementary OS team, to concentrate on fixing critical bugs and add the final touches to the Beta release. They still need to add some patches to fix backlight brightness issues on Nvidia GPUs. Read more

Server: Red Hat, Security, Samba, Docker, Microsoft Canonical and MongoDB

PocketBeagle and Android