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BSD

pfSense 2.3.3 RELEASE Now Available!

Filed under
Security
BSD

We are happy to announce the release of pfSense® software version 2.3.3!

This is a maintenance release in the 2.3.x series, bringing numerous stability and bug fixes, fixes for a handful of security issues in the GUI, and a handful of new features. The full list of changes is on the 2.3.3 New Features and Changes page, including a list of FreeBSD and internal security advisories addressed by this release.

This release includes fixes for 101 bugs, 14 Features, and 3 Todo items.

If you haven’t yet caught up on the changes in 2.3.x, check out the Features and Highlights video. Past blog posts have covered some of the changes, such as the performance improvements from tryforward, and the webGUI update.

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Also: NetBSD Accomplishes Reproducible Builds

GNU and BSD

Filed under
GNU
BSD
  • I love Free Software Day 2017

    In the Free Software society we exchange a lot of criticism. We write bug reports, tell others how they can improve the software, ask them for new features, and generally are not shy about criticising others. There is nothing wrong about that. It helps us to constantly improve. But sometimes we forget to show the hardworking people behind the software our appreciation.

  • GCC 7 To Have Better Test Coverage, Unit Testing

    Red Hat developer David Malcolm has shared the work he's been doing on improving the GCC compiler's internal testing to ensure the GNU Compiler Collection is working as anticipated and is generating correct code.

    GCC 7 has many new features while Malcom's focus recently has been improving GCC's own test suite to ensure the quality and correctness of the code being generated.

  • bsdtalk266 - The nodes take over
  • FreeBSD Ended Out 2016 With Work On Using The LLD Linker, ARM64, LXQt Porting

    FreeBSD has issued their latest quarterly report covering Q4'2016, from October to December of development highlights.

BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD
  • Clangd: LLVM's Clang Gets A Server
  • GhostBSD 11.0 to Ship with Whisker Menu as Default Application Menu for Xfce

    The GhostBSD developers have announced this past weekend the availability of the first Alpha development release of the upcoming GhostBSD 11.0 open-source, BSD-based operating system.

    GhostBSD 11.0 development is ongoing, and a first Alpha build is now ready for public testing, for early adopters and anyone else who wants to help the GhostBSD developers polish the final release of the operating system by fixing the remaining bugs. This Alpha adds the missing Xfce .xinitrc configuration file and theme engine.

BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD

It's Become Much Easier To Run Steam On FreeBSD-Derived TrueOS

Filed under
BSD
Gaming

There have been ways to get Steam running on FreeBSD using Wine and efforts as well with using the operating system's Linux binary compatibility layer, but now it's become much easier for users of TrueOS, formerly known as PC-BSD.

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OPNsense 17.1 “Eclectic Eagle” Released

Filed under
Security
BSD

The OPNsense team is proud to announce the final availability of version 17.1, nicknamed “Eclectic Eagle”. This major release features FreeBSD 11.0, the SSH remote installer, new languages Italian / Czech / Portuguese, state-of-the-art HardenedBSD security features, PHP 7.0, new plugins for FTP Proxy / Tinc VPN / Let’s Encrypt, native PAM authentication against e.g. 2FA (TOTP), as well a rewritten Nano-style card images that adapt to media size to name only a few.

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GhostBSD 11.0 Pre-Alpha 4 Released

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BSD

Developers working on the FreeBSD-derived GhostBSD distribution are working to get their 11.0 release out the door that's based off last year's FreeBSD 11.0 code-base.

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GhostBSD 11.0 PREALPHA4 is ready for testing

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BSD

This PREALPHA4 release is ready for testing new feature and debugging of GhostBSD 11.0, MATE and XFCE are available with i386 and amd64 architectures.

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Leftovers: BSD

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BSD
  • BSD Mag: Understanding Unikernels by Russell Pavlicek

    The number of tasks which lend themselves to being unikernels is larger than you might think. In 2015, Martin Lucina announced the successful creation of a “RAMP” stack. A variant of the common “LAMP” stack (Linux. Apache, MySQL, PHP/Python), the “RAMP” stack employs NGINX, MySQL, and PHP each built on Rumprun. Rumprun is an instance of a Rump kernel, which is a unikernel system based on the modular operating system functions found in the NetBSD project. So even this very common solution stack can be successfully converted into unikernels.

  • Summary of the preliminary LLDB support project

    Operating systems can be called monitors as they handle system calls from userland processes. A similar task is performed by debuggers as they implement monitors for traced applications and interpret various events that occurred in tracees and are messaged usually with signals to their tracers. During this month I have started a new Process Plugin within LLDB to incept NativeProcessNetBSD - copied from NativeProcessLinux - implementing basic functionality and handling all the needed events in the MonitorCallback() function. To achieve these tasks, I had to add a bunch of new ptrace(2) interfaces in the kernel to cover all that is required by LLDB monitors. The current Process Plugin for NetBSD is capable to start a process, catch all the needed events correctly and if applicable resume or step the process.

  • NetBSD Making Progress On LLDB Debugger Support

    NetBSD developers have been implementing the relevant interfaces needed for the LLVM debugger to effectively monitor and work on the operating system. As part of that they have also improved some of their own documentation, provided new ptrace interfaces, and more.

    Those interested in LLDB and/or NetBSD can learn more about this debugging work via this NetBSD.org blog post.

BSD Leftovers

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BSD
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7 tools for analyzing performance in Linux with bcc/BPF

A new technology has arrived in Linux that can provide sysadmins and developers with a large number of new tools and dashboards for performance analysis and troubleshooting. It's called the enhanced Berkeley Packet Filter (eBPF, or just BPF), although these enhancements weren't developed in Berkeley, they operate on much more than just packets, and they do much more than just filtering. I'll discuss one way to use BPF on the Fedora and Red Hat family of Linux distributions, demonstrating on Fedora 26. BPF can run user-defined sandboxed programs in the kernel to add new custom capabilities instantly. It's like adding superpowers to Linux, on demand. Examples of what you can use it for include: Read more