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BSD

FreeBsd Vs OpenBsd

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BSD

There are a number of Unix-like operating systems based on or descended from the Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) series of Unix variants. The three most notable descendants in current use are FreeBSD, OpenBSD, and NetBSD, which are all derived from 386BSD and 4.4BSD-Lite, by various routes. Both NetBSD and FreeBSD started life in 1993, initially derived from 386BSD, but in 1994 migrating to a 4.4BSD-Lite code base. OpenBSD was forked in 1995 from NetBSD. Other notable derivatives include DragonFly BSD, which was forked from FreeBSD 4.8, and Apple Inc.’s iOS and OS X, with its Darwin base including a large amount of code derived from FreeBSD.

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ubuntuBSD Is Looking to Become an Official Ubuntu Flavor

Filed under
BSD
Ubuntu

ubuntuBSD maintainer and lead developer Jon Boden is now looking for a way for his operating system to contribute to the Ubuntu community and, eventually, become an official Ubuntu flavor.

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FreeBSD/PC-BSD 10.3 vs. Linux Benchmarks

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BSD

With FreeBSD 10.3 having been released followed by the desktop-oriented PC-BSD 10.3 release that's running rather nicely, I decided to run some open-source performance benchmarks atop PC-BSD 10.3 x64 compared to various Linux distributions.

Originally I also aimed to run some PC-BSD vs. Linux gaming tests using the updated Linux binary compatibility layer in FreeBSD 10.3's kernel, but sadly, that didn't pan out. As noted in the aforelinked article, I've been running into a variety of issues that made my usual test candidates not run on PC-BSD 10.3 with either the x86 or x86_64 Linux binaries. If you want to see my old tests, there is FreeBSD: A Faster Platform For Linux Gaming Than Linux? from a few years ago.

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PC-BSD 10.3 Is Looking Great, Plus Trying The Linux Compatibility Layer

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Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD

Following this week's release of FreeBSD 10.3 has been the releases of the deskop-friendly PC-BSD 10.3 operating system along with PC-BSD's server-focused TrueOS 10.3 release. I've fired up PC-BSD 10.3 for some benchmarking and so far the experience has been going great.

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BSD and GNU

Filed under
GNU
BSD

LLVM and FreeBSD

Filed under
BSD
  • LLVM's New LLD ELF Linker Continues To Mature For Linux Systems

    Last year LLVM developers made significant progress on developing a new ELF linker for Linux/Unix-like systems. Since then, this high-performance linker from LLD (dubbed "LLD") has continued maturing and gaining additional functionality.

  • FreeBSD 10.3 lands
  • FreeBSD 10.3 Officially Released With Much Better Linux Binary Compatibility

    FreeBSD 10.3 is now out in stable release form.

    FreeBSD 10.3 offers improvements to its UEFI boot loader support, support for high availability setups with the CAM Target Layout, much improved support to FreeBSD's Linux binary compatibility layer, support with the Linux compatibility layer for running 64-bit applications on x86_64, initial support for reroot support in the reboot utility, GNOME 3.16.2 is now packaged, and there are many other improvements.

PC-BSD 10.3 Is the Last in the Series, PC-BSD 11.0 Arrives Later This Year

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BSD

PC-BSD developer Kris Moore was more than happy to announce today, April 4, 2016, the release and immediate availability for download of the PC-BSD 10.3 operating system.

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FreeBSD 10.3 Officially Released with Skylake Support, ZFS Boot Capability, More

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BSD

Today, April 4, 2016, the FreeBSD project proudly announced the official release and general availability of the FreeBSD 10.3 operating system powered by a BSD kernel.

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Also: FreeBSD 10.3 Officially Released With Much Better Linux Binary Compatibility

UbuntuBSD

Filed under
BSD
Ubuntu

In the world of free software, you have more choices. Because your system is made up of free, reusable components, you could cobble together a similar system that meets your needs. And, you can release it so other users can benefit too.

That's exactly what happened in the case of UbuntuBSD. When Canonical decided to adopt systemd in Ubuntu, some users were far from pleased. Jon Boden was one of them. But, thanks to the flexibility of FOSS software, he was able to build his own version of Ubuntu without systemd—and his solution is quite intriguing.

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Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • UbuntuBSD

    Regardless of your position on the systemd debate, projects such as the UbuntuBSD distribution offer a wider range of options to the FOSS community at large. And, there are cases where a BSD kernel will provide better performance than Linux.

  • [pfSense] 2.3 Release Candidate now available!

    We are proud to announce pfSense® software version 2.3 Release Candidate is now available!

    The most significant changes in this release are a rewrite of the webGUI utilizing Bootstrap, and the underlying system being converted entirely to FreeBSD pkg (including the base system and kernel). The pkg conversion enables us to update pieces of the system individually going forward, rather than the monolithic updates of the past.

  • LLVM Adds Intel Lakemont CPU Support

    The LLVM compiler infrastructure now has support for Intel's Lakemont processor.

    Lakemont is the codename for the Quark processors that include the Quark X1000 SoC. The Lakemont hardware has been available for a while now but continues to be used in different applications and Intel continues improving its support.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat's Survey in India

From Raspberry Pi to Supercomputers to the Cloud: The Linux Operating System

Linux is widely used in corporations now as the basis for everything from file servers to web servers to network security servers. The no-cost as well as commercial availability of distributions makes it an obvious choice in many scenarios. Distributions of Linux now power machines as small as the tiny Raspberry Pi to the largest supercomputers in the world. There is a wide variety of minimal and security hardened distributions, some of them designed for GPU workloads. Read more

IBM’s Systems With GNU/Linux

  • IBM Gives Power Systems Rebates For Linux Workloads
    Big Blue has made no secret whatsoever that it wants to ride the Linux wave up with the Power Systems platform, and its marketeers are doing what they can to sweeten the hardware deals as best they can without adversely affecting the top and bottom line at IBM in general and the Power Systems division in particular to help that Linux cause along.
  • Drilling Down Into IBM’s System Group
    The most obvious thing is that IBM’s revenues and profits continue to shrink, but the downside is getting smaller and smaller, and we think that IBM’s core systems business will start to level out this year and maybe even grow by the third or fourth quarter, depending on when Power9-based Power Systems and z14-based System z mainframes hit the market. In the final period of 2016, IBM’s overall revenues were $21.77 billion, down 1.1 percent from a year ago, and net income rose by nearly a point to $4.5 billion. This is sure a lot better than a year ago, when IBM’s revenues fell by 8.4 percent to $22 billion and its net income fell by 18.6 percent to $4.46 billion. For the full 2016 year, IBM’s revenues were off 2.1 percent to $79.85 billion, but its “real” systems business, which includes servers, storage, switching, systems software, databases, transaction monitors, and tech support and financing for its own iron, fell by 8.3 percent to $26.1 billion. (That’s our estimate; IBM does not break out sales this way, but we have some pretty good guesses on how it all breaks down.)

Security News

  • DB Ransom Attacks Spread to CouchDB and Hadoop [Ed: Get sysadmins who know what they are doing, as misconfigurations are expensive]
  • Security advisories for Monday
  • Return on Risk Investment
  • Widely used WebEx plugin for Chrome will execute attack code—patch now!
    The Chrome browser extension for Cisco Systems WebEx communications and collaboration service was just updated to fix a vulnerability that leaves all 20 million users susceptible to drive-by attacks that can be carried out by just about any website they visit.
  • DDoS attacks larger, more frequent and complex says Arbor
    Distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks are becoming more frequent and complex, forcing businesses to deploy purpose-built DDoS protection solutions, according to a new infrastructure security report which warns that the threat landscape has been transformed by the emergence of Internet of Things (IoT) botnets. The annual worldwide infrastructure security report from Arbor Networks - the security division of NETSCOUT - reveals that the largest distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack reported in 2016 was 800 Gbps, a 60% increase over 2015’s largest attack of 500 Gbps.