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BSD

DragonFly 3.8, coming soon

Filed under
BSD

We're due for the next release of DragonFly, which will be 3.8. If you
have anything you want to get in, do it soon.

Here's my plan:
- Tag 3.8rc this weekend.
- Assuming problems, fix and tag 3.8rc2 and so on.
- Assuming no problems, tag 3.8.0 on June 4th.

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Preview of GhostBSD 4.0

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

GhostBSD is a desktop distribution that’s based on FreeBSD. The core developers are from Canada, so I think it ok to call it a Canadian distribution. The only article I’ve written about this distribution was a review of GhostBSD 2.5 back in February 2012 (see GhostBSD 2.5 review). I wasn’t impressed.

But that was then, this is now. The third alpha of what will become GhostBSD 4.0 was released a few days ago. To see how far the distribution has come since the 2.5 edition, I downloaded and installed it from a DVD image in a virtual environment. I’m still not terribly impressed, though I realize the this is only a third alpha release. The following screenshots were taken from that test installation.

This is what the boot menu looks like. This needs to change. Even PC-BSD, another FreeBSD-based distribution, has abandoned this bland boot menu.

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GhostBSD 4.0-ALPHA3 now available

Filed under
BSD

After a long awaiting time the third ALPHA build of the 4.0-RELEASE release cycle is ultimately available on SourceForge for the amd64, i386 architectures.

Where to download

The image checksums, ISO images and USB images are available here:
http://www.ghostbsd.org/download-4.0

Changes and problem fixed between 4.0-ALPHA2 and 4.0-ALPHA3 include:

Network after install work on Virtualbox
Added back Wifimgr for better wifi support until Networkmgr work flawlessly
Removed gimp to since Gimp is easily install with sudo pkg install gimp
Removed all software that depend on Nautilus like Rhythmbox and gksu.
Exaile is replacing Rhythmbox
GhostBSD user is now removed after installation.
New experimental look

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GCC vs. LLVM Clang On NVIDIA's Tegra K1 Quad-Core Cortex-A15

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD

Recently I posted new benchmarks showing LLVM's Clang compiler performing well against GCC from AMD's x86-based Athlon APUs with the performance of the resulting binaries being quite fast but not without some blemishes for both of these open-source compilers. In seeing how the compiler race is doing in the ARM space with many ARM vendors taking interest in LLVM/Clang, here's some fresh benchmarks of both compilers on NVIDIA's Tegra K1 SoC found by the Jetson TK1 development board.

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JabirOS 2.0.0 Released as an independent BSD Variant!

Filed under
BSD

We’re proud to announce the second release of JabirOS, as a BSD variant. JabirOS isn’t a FreeBSD distribution anymore. This version is a complete and independent fork from FreeBSD 10-RELEASE. Muhammadreza Haghiri, the leader of this project had forked and compiled it, after tests, we have managed to run all of FreeBSD packages for a minimailst and normal desktop computer. Also, we’ve tested some CLI software, for making a little server.
All of our tests were successful, and we’re proud of our new product.

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OpenBSD Affirms That LibreSSL Will Be Portable

Filed under
Security
BSD

In the fallout from the OpenSSL heartbleed bug, OpenBSD developers forked OpenSSL into LibreSSL. Initially the only supported platform for LibreSSL was OpenBSD, but the BSD developers are pushing harder now for platform portability.

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ZFS on Linux

Filed under
Linux
BSD

How ZFS on Linux compares to ZFS on Illumos or FreeBSD

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OpenBSD 5.5 "Wrap in Time" Arrives with a Fix for the Infamous Year 2038 Problem

Filed under
BSD

OpenBSD is one of the few projects that manage to stick to a specific release schedule, so a new version of this operating system is usually made available twice a year. The previous OpenBSD release was on November 3, which means that now it's time for another one.

This is not your average operating system. It's mostly used by people who know what they are doing. It's not easy to install and it's not easy to get a friendly desktop environment ready for use. This being said, users need to be sure before getting involved with OpenBSD.

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PC-BSD Is Developing Its Own Desktop Environment

Filed under
Development
BSD

Right now Lumina is considered in an early alpha state but is now found within PC-BSD's ports/package repositories. Lumina aims to be lightweight, stable, and fast-running. Most of the Lumina work is being done by PC-BSD's Ken Moore.

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OpenBSD forks, prunes, fixes OpenSSL

Filed under
Security
BSD

OpenSSL is the dominant SSL/TLS library on the Internet, but has suffered significant reputation damage in recent days for the Heartbleed bug. The incident has revived criticism of OpenSSL as a poorly-run project with source code that is impenetrable and documented, where it is at all documented, badly and inaccurately.

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CoreOS 'Rockets' Ahead With Docker Alternative

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I Switched (Back) Over To Fedora As My Main OS & It's Going Great!

Before this long stint with Ubuntu on my main system, I was using Fedora (Core) and before that was openSUSE, Mandrake, and others. I stopped using Fedora (Core) due to some of the releases being less reliable than others with at the time less of a focus on shipping quality releases and at times just feeling like a dirty testing ground for RHEL. With being very pleased with Fedora 20 and Fedora 21 on the many test systems around the office, I decided to give Fedora another go on my main system. I've also been very interested in Fedora.Next and how Fedora 22 is shaping up. Fedora these days seems to be back on a solid footing for end-users with a bright future ahead; Fedora 22 might even ship on time for a change while not sacrificing quality! Fedora 21 brings back a lot of good memories for me of the early Fedora days. Read more

Elementary Extensions for Python-EFL

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‘Enterprise customers are now more willing to implement open source’

Jim Whitehurst expects India to play a larger role in NYSE-listed Red Hat’s global strategy, thanks to the rapid pace of infrastructure creation. “When a new system’s put into place, it’s increasingly likely that it may be built on open source. We like places where there is a lot of infrastructure going in,” Whitehurst, President and Chief Executive Officer, Red Hat, said. Red Hat is the world’s largest commercial distributor of the open source-based Linux operating system. Open source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. In an interaction with BusinessLine, Whitehurst throws light on the opportunities in the Indian marketplace for open source. He also explains why the company is keen to increasingly move more support functions to India. Read more