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BSD

LLVM/Clang and Google

Filed under
Development
Google
BSD
  • RFC: EfficiencySanitizer

    We plan to build a suite of compiler-based dynamic instrumentation tools for analyzing targeted performance problems. These tools will all live under a new "EfficiencySanitizer" (or "esan") sanitizer umbrella, as they will share significant portions of their implementations.

  • Google Is Working On An Efficiency Sanitizer To Improve Performance Problems

    Derek Bruening of Google has announced the company's interest in creating an "Efficiency Sanitizer" for LLVM/Clang for analyzing targeted performance problems.

    Worked on Google and other compoanies have been Address Sanitizer, Memory Sanitizer, Thread Sanitizer, Leak Sanitizer, Data Flow Sanitizer, and other sanitizers found in LLVM/Clang some of which have also been ported to GCC. These sanitizers have been incredibly helpful for developers in catching various problems within program code-bases, including many security issues. The latest focus being pursued by Google's compiler engineers is on an Efficiency Sanitizer.

ubuntuBSD, the OS That Brings Ubuntu and FreeBSD Together, Now Has a Homepage

Filed under
BSD
Ubuntu

Jon Boden, the creator of the controversial ubuntuBSD project, an open-source and free operating system that brings Ubuntu and FreeBSD together, unveiled the distribution's official homepage.

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pfSense 2.3

Filed under
Security
BSD
  • pfSense 2.3-RELEASE Now Available!

    The most significant changes in this release are a rewrite of the webGUI utilizing Bootstrap, and the underlying system, including the base system and kernel, being converted entirely to FreeBSD pkg. The pkg conversion enables us to update pieces of the system individually going forward, rather than the monolithic updates of the past. The webGUI rewrite brings a new responsive look and feel to pfSense requiring a minimum of resizing or scrolling on a wide range of devices from desktop to mobile phones.

  • pfSense 2.3 Released With New Web UI

    BSD --
    PfSense 2.3 was released today as the newest version of this popular FreeBSD-based firewall/router OS appliance software.

    The pfSense 2.3 release has a rewritten web GUI that's now making use of Bootstrap to provide a clean and responsive experience. The pfSense 2.3 release also converts the underlying system now to completely using FreeBSD's pkg for package management, and there are various other underlying updates.

  • pfSense 2.3 BSD-Based Firewall Officially Released with Revamped webGUI, More

    Electric Sheep Fencing LLC., through Chris Buechler, today, April 12, 2016, has had the great pleasure of announcing the release of the stable pfSense 2.3 BSD-based firewall operating system.

FreeBsd Vs OpenBsd

Filed under
BSD

There are a number of Unix-like operating systems based on or descended from the Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) series of Unix variants. The three most notable descendants in current use are FreeBSD, OpenBSD, and NetBSD, which are all derived from 386BSD and 4.4BSD-Lite, by various routes. Both NetBSD and FreeBSD started life in 1993, initially derived from 386BSD, but in 1994 migrating to a 4.4BSD-Lite code base. OpenBSD was forked in 1995 from NetBSD. Other notable derivatives include DragonFly BSD, which was forked from FreeBSD 4.8, and Apple Inc.’s iOS and OS X, with its Darwin base including a large amount of code derived from FreeBSD.

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ubuntuBSD Is Looking to Become an Official Ubuntu Flavor

Filed under
BSD
Ubuntu

ubuntuBSD maintainer and lead developer Jon Boden is now looking for a way for his operating system to contribute to the Ubuntu community and, eventually, become an official Ubuntu flavor.

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FreeBSD/PC-BSD 10.3 vs. Linux Benchmarks

Filed under
BSD

With FreeBSD 10.3 having been released followed by the desktop-oriented PC-BSD 10.3 release that's running rather nicely, I decided to run some open-source performance benchmarks atop PC-BSD 10.3 x64 compared to various Linux distributions.

Originally I also aimed to run some PC-BSD vs. Linux gaming tests using the updated Linux binary compatibility layer in FreeBSD 10.3's kernel, but sadly, that didn't pan out. As noted in the aforelinked article, I've been running into a variety of issues that made my usual test candidates not run on PC-BSD 10.3 with either the x86 or x86_64 Linux binaries. If you want to see my old tests, there is FreeBSD: A Faster Platform For Linux Gaming Than Linux? from a few years ago.

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PC-BSD 10.3 Is Looking Great, Plus Trying The Linux Compatibility Layer

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD

Following this week's release of FreeBSD 10.3 has been the releases of the deskop-friendly PC-BSD 10.3 operating system along with PC-BSD's server-focused TrueOS 10.3 release. I've fired up PC-BSD 10.3 for some benchmarking and so far the experience has been going great.

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BSD and GNU

Filed under
GNU
BSD

LLVM and FreeBSD

Filed under
BSD
  • LLVM's New LLD ELF Linker Continues To Mature For Linux Systems

    Last year LLVM developers made significant progress on developing a new ELF linker for Linux/Unix-like systems. Since then, this high-performance linker from LLD (dubbed "LLD") has continued maturing and gaining additional functionality.

  • FreeBSD 10.3 lands
  • FreeBSD 10.3 Officially Released With Much Better Linux Binary Compatibility

    FreeBSD 10.3 is now out in stable release form.

    FreeBSD 10.3 offers improvements to its UEFI boot loader support, support for high availability setups with the CAM Target Layout, much improved support to FreeBSD's Linux binary compatibility layer, support with the Linux compatibility layer for running 64-bit applications on x86_64, initial support for reroot support in the reboot utility, GNOME 3.16.2 is now packaged, and there are many other improvements.

PC-BSD 10.3 Is the Last in the Series, PC-BSD 11.0 Arrives Later This Year

Filed under
BSD

PC-BSD developer Kris Moore was more than happy to announce today, April 4, 2016, the release and immediate availability for download of the PC-BSD 10.3 operating system.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • OpenSSL patches two high-severity flaws
    OpenSSL has released versions 1.0.2h and 1.0.1t of its open source cryptographic library, fixing multiple security vulnerabilities that can lead to traffic being decrypted, denial-of-service attacks, and arbitrary code execution. One of the high-severity vulnerabilities is actually a hybrid of two low-risk bugs and can cause OpenSSL to crash.
  • Linux Foundation Advances Security Efforts via Badging Program
    The Linux Foundation Core Infrastructure Initiative's badging program matures, as the first projects to achieve security badges are announced.
  • Linux Foundation tackles open source security with new badge program
  • WordPress Plugin ‘Ninja Forms’ Security Vulnerability
    FOSS Force has just learned from Wordfence, a security company that focuses on the open source WordPress content management platform, that a popular plugin used by over 500,000 sites, Ninja Forms, contains serious security vulnerabilities.
  • Preparing Your Network for the IoT Revolution
    While there is no denying that IP-based connectivity continues to become more and more pervasive, this is not a fundamentally new thing. What is new is the target audience is changing and connectivity is becoming much more personal. It’s no longer limited to high end technology consumers (watches and drones) but rather, it is showing up in nearly everything from children’s toys to kitchen appliances (yes again) and media devices. The purchasers of these new technology-enabled products are far from security experts, or even security aware. Their primary purchasing requirements are ease of use.
  • regarding embargoes
    Yesterday I jumped the gun committing some patches to LibreSSL. We receive advance copies of the advisory and patches so that when the new OpenSSL ships, we’re ready to ship as well. Between the time we receive advance notice and the public release, we’re supposed to keep this information confidential. This is the embargo. During the embargo time we get patches lined up and a source tree for each cvs branch in a precommit state. Then we wait with our fingers on the trigger. What happened yesterday was I woke up to a couple OpenBSD developers talking about the EBCDIC CVE. Oh, it’s public already? Check the OpenSSL git repo and sure enough, there are a bunch of commits for embargoed issues. Pull the trigger! Pull the trigger! Launch the missiles! Alas, we didn’t look closely enough at the exact issues fixed and had missed the fact that only low severity issues had been made public. The high severity issues were still secret. We were too hasty.
  • Medical Equipment Crashes During Heart Procedure Because of Antivirus Scan [Ed: Windows]
    A critical medical equipment crashed during a heart procedure due to a timely scan triggered by the antivirus software installed on the PC to which the said device was sending data for logging and monitoring.
  • Hotel sector faces cybercrime surge as data breaches start to bite
    Since 2014, things have become a lot more serious with a cross section of mostly US hotels suffering major breaches during Point-of-Sale (POS) terminals. Panda Security lists a string of attacks on big brands including on Trump Hotels, Hilton Worldwide, Hyatt, Starwood, Rosen Hotels & Resorts as well two separate attacks on hotel management outfit White Lodging and another on non-US hotel Mandarin Oriental.

Android Leftovers

today's howtos