Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

BSD

OpenBSD 6.2 Released Early

Filed under
BSD

BSD: OpenBSD 6.2 Out a Week From Now

Filed under
BSD

BSD: FreeBSD 10.4, LibertyBSD 6.1, OpenSSH 7.6

Filed under
BSD
  • FreeBSD gains eMMC support so … errr … watch out, Android

    Version 10.4 of FreeBSD has landed, with the headline feature being support for eMMC.

    For those of you still short of your best after nocturnal chemical exertions, eMMC – aka Embedded Multimedia Card – packs some flash memory and a controller into a single package. That arrangement is handy for manufacturers of personal electronics.

  • LibertyBSD 6.1 Released As A "Deblobbed" Version Of OpenBSD

    LibertyBSD 6.1 is now available as a deblobbed version of OpenBSD.

    LibertyBSD is a downstream of OpenBSD that focuses on only distributing free software. OpenBSD ships with non-free, binary-only firmware like Linux, but LibertyBSD strips away those binary-only bits, similar to the Linux-libre downstream kernel.

  • OpenSSH 7.6 has just been released.

OpenSSH 7.6 and FreeBSD 10.4

Filed under
Software
Security
BSD

FreeBSD 10.4 Released With Full Support For eMMC Storage

Filed under
BSD

The latest release in the FreeBSD 10 series is now available with some work backported from FreeBSD 11 and other improvements/fixes.

FreeBSD 10.4 happens to be the operating system's first release with full support for eMMC storage. FreeBSD 10.4 also has improvements to its AES-NI driver, better Intel Kabylake device support, em networking driver improvements, various Wake-On-LAN (WoL) improvements to different drivers, updated firmware/microcode files, and more.

Read more

DragonFlyBSD 5.0 Branched As The Next Release

Filed under
BSD

We've known a new DragonFlyBSD release was being worked on for release soon. That release has now been branched, the first release candidate tagged, and it's being marked as version 5.0.

Succeeding DragonFlyBSD 4.8 will be DragonFlyBSD 5.0. 5.0.0-rc1 was tagged on Friday night while the code is branched for the 5.0 release undertaking. On Git master is now the DragonFly 5.1 development version.

Read more

BSD: Testing OpenSSH 7.6, 23 Years of FreeDOS

Filed under
BSD
  • Call for testing: OpenSSH 7.6

    OpenSSH 7.6p1 is almost ready for release, so we would appreciate testing
    on as many platforms and systems as possible. This is a bugfix release.

  • 23 Years of FreeDOS

    This eBook contains the voices of many of the users who contributed their stories, as well as the history of FreeDOS. Many individuals have helped make FreeDOS what it is, but this eBook represents only a few of them. I hope you enjoy this collection of 23 years of everything FreeDOS!

FreeBSD 10.4-RC2 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

The second RC build of the 10.4-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Read more

FreeBSD 10.4-RC1 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

The first RC build of the 10.4-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o amd64 GENERIC
o i386 GENERIC
o ia64 GENERIC
o powerpc GENERIC
o powerpc64 GENERIC64
o sparc64 GENERIC
o armv6 BEAGLEBONE
o armv6 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
o armv6 GUMSTIX
o armv6 PANDABOARD
o armv6 RPI-B
o armv6 WANDBOARD

Read more

OpenBSD Development News

Filed under
Development
BSD
  • t2k17 Hackathon report: Ken Westerback on dhclient progress, developer herding
  • A return-oriented programming defense from OpenBSD

    Stack-smashing attacks have a long history; they featured, for example, as a core part of the Morris worm back in 1988. Restrictions on executing code on the stack have, to a great extent, put an end to such simple attacks, but that does not mean that stack-smashing attacks are no longer a threat. Return-oriented programming (ROP) has become a common technique for compromising systems via a stack-smashing vulnerability. There are various schemes out there for defeating ROP attacks, but a mechanism called "RETGUARD" that is being implemented in OpenBSD is notable for its relative simplicity.

    In a classic stack-smashing attack, the attack code would be written directly to the stack and executed there. Most modern systems do not allow execution of on-stack code, though, so this kind of attack will be ineffective. The stack does affect code execution, though, in that the call chain is stored there; when a function executes a "return" instruction, the address to return to is taken from the stack. An attacker who can overwrite the stack can, thus, force a function to "return" to an arbitrary location.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

6-Way Enterprise Focused Linux Distribution Comparison With An Intel Core i9, Dual Xeon Gold Systems

Here's our latest Linux distribution comparison with this time looking at the out-of-the-box performance of six Linux distributions while running a range of enterprise/workstation-focused benchmarks while using two systems. One system is a high-end Core i9 7980XE desktop system and the other a Tyan 1U Xeon Scalable server with dual Xeon Gold 6138 processors. Read more

Security: FOSS Versus Windows

Linux/Android hacker SBC with hexa-core Rockchip SoC debuts at $75

The Vamrs “RK3399 Sapphire” SBC is on sale for $75, or $349 for a full kit. Vamrs is also prepping an RK3399-based “Rock960” 96Boards SBC. Rockchip’s RK3399 is one of the most powerful ARM-based system-on-chips available on hacker boards, featuring two server-class Cortex-A72 cores clocked to up to 2.0GHz, as well as four Cortex-A53 at up to 1.42GHz and a quad-core Mali-T864 GPU. The hexa-core SoC has appeared on T-Firefly’s Firefly-RK3399 SBC and RK3399 Coreboard computer-on-module, as well as Videostrong’s VS-RD-RK3399 SBC and Theobroma’s RK3399-Q7 Qseven module. Now we have a new contender: Shenzhen based Vamrs, which built the limited edition Rockchip RK3399 Sapphire SBC as the official RK3399 dev board for Rockchip, is now re-launching the board, which features a 40-pin Raspberry Pi compatible connector, with “many in stock” for a discounted price of $75. Read more