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The DragonFly BSD Team is Working in Reducing of ISO Image Size

Filed under
BSD

Usually an operating system’s installation media grows from one release to the next release as they add more features.

The DragonFly BSD team is working in reducing of ISO image size by reducing the size of packages on the operating system’s media.

The next release of DragonFly BSD ISO image size should be smaller.

They have removed enough packages on the installer image to drop the package disk usage 50%.

How it can be done?

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Direct: Reduce the size of /usr/local on the IMG/ISO considerably.

Stable release: HardenedBSD-stable 12-STABLE v1200059

Filed under
BSD

MFC r348167, r348168, r348359, r348361: Add posixshmcontrol(1) utility. (a6d485ce245aa9798f9e402c446010f26ab974ba)
MFC 347033: Increase the VirtIO segment count to support modern Windows guests. (8fb552d38dcee4f17df31d13ac823568a76c5988)
MFC r348052: NDFREE(): Fix unlocking for LOCKPARENT|LOCKLEAF and ndp->ni_dvp == ndp->ni_vp. (7b981e827b29bdf244f703e789cb02e6a37729b9)

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FreeBSD 11.3 Beta 3

Filed under
BSD

The third BETA build of the 11.3-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 11.3-BETA3 amd64 GENERIC
o 11.3-BETA3 i386 GENERIC
o 11.3-BETA3 powerpc GENERIC
o 11.3-BETA3 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 11.3-BETA3 sparc64 GENERIC
o 11.3-BETA3 armv6 BANANAPI
o 11.3-BETA3 armv6 BEAGLEBONE
o 11.3-BETA3 armv6 CUBIEBOARD
o 11.3-BETA3 armv6 CUBIEBOARD2
o 11.3-BETA3 armv6 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
o 11.3-BETA3 armv6 RPI-B
o 11.3-BETA3 armv6 RPI2
o 11.3-BETA3 armv6 PANDABOARD
o 11.3-BETA3 armv6 WANDBOARD
o 11.3-BETA3 aarch64 GENERIC

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/11.3/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "stable/11" branch.

A summary of changes since 11.3-BETA2 includes:

o Support for the IPV6_NEXTHOP option has been restored.

o Warnings for IPsec algorithms deprecated in RFC 8221 have been added.

o Fix for FC-Tape bugs.

o A fix in jail_getid(3) for jail(8) ID 0.

o Warnings for weaker geli(4) algorithms have been added.

o Various updates and fixes in libarchive(3).

o A fix in cxgbe(4) to address a connection hang when running iozone
  over an NFS-mounted share.

o A fix to the zfs(8) 'userspace' subcommand where all unresolved UIDs
  after the first were ignored.

o An apm(8) fix to correct battery life calculation.

o The default size of Vagrant images has been increased.

o Reporting on deprecated features for all major FreeBSD versions has
  been merged.

A list of changes since 11.2-RELEASE is available in the stable/11
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/relnotes/11-STABLE/relnotes/article.html

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 11.3-RELEASE cycle progresses.

=== Virtual Machine Disk Images ===

VM disk images are available for the amd64, i386, and aarch64
architectures.  Disk images may be downloaded from the following URL
(or any of the FreeBSD FTP mirrors):

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/VM-IMAGES/11.3-BETA3/

The partition layout is:

    ~ 16 kB - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    ~ 1 GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    ~ 20 GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image
formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB and 165 MB
respectively (amd64/i386), decompressing to a 21 GB sparse image.

Note regarding arm64/aarch64 virtual machine images: a modified QEMU EFI
loader file is needed for qemu-system-aarch64 to be able to boot the
virtual machine images.  See this page for more information:

    https://wiki.freebsd.org/arm64/QEMU

To boot the VM image, run:

    % qemu-system-aarch64 -m 4096M -cpu cortex-a57 -M virt  \
	-bios QEMU_EFI.fd -serial telnet::4444,server -nographic \
	-drive if=none,file=VMDISK,id=hd0 \
	-device virtio-blk-device,drive=hd0 \
	-device virtio-net-device,netdev=net0 \
	-netdev user,id=net0

Be sure to replace "VMDISK" with the path to the virtual machine image.

=== Amazon EC2 AMI Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  eu-north-1 region: ami-07fd27786377bc6fd
  ap-south-1 region: ami-01f208a9f001a22e2
  eu-west-3 region: ami-085439f21755d95a4
  eu-west-2 region: ami-0993e4ba21a62262d
  eu-west-1 region: ami-0f2f6a13b79dd804b
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-07164fb9df8db807f
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-0c1b2bbd0b1cced6e
  sa-east-1 region: ami-0d51b7b8c6a2f8a57
  ca-central-1 region: ami-054c4785980cbfbb4
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-07cbfed103b47434a
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-06e7f111242f4a03e
  eu-central-1 region: ami-05b82446f270f2c7e
  us-east-1 region: ami-0b3ea59d3140af471
  us-east-2 region: ami-0b59f21c8a159bf51
  us-west-1 region: ami-0a6d215b372bd8a86
  us-west-2 region: ami-0861887499c7e29c3

=== Vagrant Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 images are available on the Hashicorp Atlas site, and can
be installed by running:

    % vagrant init freebsd/FreeBSD-11.3-BETA3
    % vagrant up

=== Upgrading ===

The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386
systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

	# freebsd-update upgrade -r 11.3-BETA3

During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by
merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
performed merging was done correctly.

	# freebsd-update install

The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before
continuing.

	# shutdown -r now

After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new
userland components:

	# freebsd-update install

It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible,
especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
FreeBSD 10.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat10x and
other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
into the new userland:

	# shutdown -r now

Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove
stale files:

	# freebsd-update install

Read more

Original from site

Also: FreeBSD 11.3 Beta 3 Arrives With Various Fixes, Correct Battery Life Reporting

BSD: NetBSD 8.1 and OpenBSD Foundation Has New Sponsor

Filed under
BSD
  • NetBSD 8.1 available

    The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce NetBSD 8.1, the first feature and stability maintenance release of the netbsd-8 stable branch.

    Besides the workarounds for the latest CPU specific vulnerabilities, this also includes many bug fixes and a few selected new drivers. For more details and instructions see the 8.1 announcement.

    Get NetBSD 8.1 from our CDN (provided by fastly) or one of the ftp mirrors.

  • NetBSD 8.1 Released With MDS Mitigations, Driver Improvements

    NetBSD 8.1 is out today as the latest feature update to this popular BSD operating system.

    NetBSD 8.1 brings Zombieload/MDS mitigations as well as the ability to turn off SMT/HT in the name of security. With Hyper Threading looking increasingly insecure, NetBSD is the latest OS providing an easy tunable for disabling it if so desired.

  • Smartisan becomes Iridium Donor for 2019

    The OpenBSD Foundation is excited to announce that it has received its largest ever donation. Smartisan has topped its own previous record donation with a 2019 donation of CDN$380,000.00. This makes Smartisan the first Iridium level donor of 2019.

BSD: OpenBSD and FreeBSD Reports

Filed under
BSD
  • g2k19 Hackathon Report: Andrew Fresh on portgen (1), coffee, and more
  • FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report - First Quarter 2019

      The FreeBSD CI team maintains continuous integration system and related
       tasks for the FreeBSD project. The CI system regularly checks the
       changes committed to the project's Subversion repository can be
       successfully built, and performs various tests and analysis of the
       results. The results from build jobs are archived in an artifact
       server, for the further testing and debugging needs. The CI team
       members examine the failing builds and unstable tests, and work with
       the experts in that area to fix the code or adjust test infrastructure.

       Starting from this quarter, we started to publish CI weekly report at
       freebsd-testing@ mailing list. The archive is available at
       https://hackfoldr.org/freebsd-ci-report/

       We also worked on extending test executing environment to improve the
       code coverage, temporarily disabling flakey test cases, and opening
       tickets to work with domain experts. The details are of these efforts
       are available in the weekly CI reports.

       We published the draft FCP for CI policy and are ready to accept
       comments.

  • FreeBSD Had A Very Busy Q1-2019 As It Approaches Its 26th Birthday

    FreeBSD had a very busy first quarter with a status report out today providing a look at to all of the ongoing development activities for this leading BSD platform. 

FreeBSD 11.3-BETA2 Now Available

Filed under
BSD
  • FreeBSD 11.3-BETA2 Now Available
    The second BETA build of the 11.3-RELEASE release cycle is now
    available.
    
    Installation images are available for:
    
    o 11.3-BETA2 amd64 GENERIC
    o 11.3-BETA2 i386 GENERIC
    o 11.3-BETA2 powerpc GENERIC
    o 11.3-BETA2 powerpc64 GENERIC64
    o 11.3-BETA2 sparc64 GENERIC
    o 11.3-BETA2 armv6 BANANAPI
    o 11.3-BETA2 armv6 BEAGLEBONE
    o 11.3-BETA2 armv6 CUBIEBOARD
    o 11.3-BETA2 armv6 CUBIEBOARD2
    o 11.3-BETA2 armv6 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
    o 11.3-BETA2 armv6 RPI-B
    o 11.3-BETA2 armv6 RPI2
    o 11.3-BETA2 armv6 PANDABOARD
    o 11.3-BETA2 armv6 WANDBOARD
    o 11.3-BETA2 aarch64 GENERIC
    
    Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
    console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
    freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
    the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
    to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
    system.
    
    Installer images and memory stick images are available here:
    
        https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/11.3/
    
    The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.
    
    If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
    system or on the -stable mailing list.
    
    If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
    system, use the "stable/11" branch.
    
    A summary of changes since 11.3-BETA1 includes:
    
    o The fsck_readdir() and dircheck() functions have been rewritten for
      clarity and correctness.
    
    o contrib/zlib has been moved to sys/contrib/zlib so that it can be used
      in the kernel.
    
    o The bhyve SMBIOS table has been made topology-aware.
    
    o Accessor function for vm->maxcpus have been added.
    
    o The bectl(8) jail with numeric boot environment (BE) names has been
      fixed.
    
    o OpenSSL has been updated to version 1.0.2s.
    
    o An update to prevent calling hw_mds_recalculate() from
      initializecpu().
    
    o An upstream LLVM fix has been merged to fix an assertion when building
      the graphics/mesa-dri port for PowerPC64.
    
    o A fix to the NDIS driver printing "(null)" when uninitialized when
      using the '-h' (help) flag.
    
    o An uart emulation bug has been fixed.
    
    o Increase the VirtIO segment count to support modern Windows guests.
    
    o A fix to prevent exposing the uptime via the TCP timestamps.
    
    o Expose the MD_CLEAR capability used by Intel MDS mitigations to
      guests.
    
    A list of changes since 11.2-RELEASE is available in the stable/11
    release notes:
    
        https://www.freebsd.org/relnotes/11-STABLE/relnotes/article.html
    
    Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
    updated on an ongoing basis as the 11.3-RELEASE cycle progresses.
    
    === Virtual Machine Disk Images ===
    
    VM disk images are available for the amd64 and i386 architectures.
    Disk images may be downloaded from the following URL (or any of the
    FreeBSD FTP mirrors):
    
        https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/VM-IMAGES/11.3-BETA2/
    
    The partition layout is:
    
        ~ 16 kB - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
        ~ 1 GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
        ~ 20 GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)
    
    The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image
    formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB and 165 MB
    respectively (amd64/i386), decompressing to a 21 GB sparse image.
    
    Note regarding arm64/aarch64 virtual machine images: a modified QEMU EFI
    loader file is needed for qemu-system-aarch64 to be able to boot the
    virtual machine images.  See this page for more information:
    
        https://wiki.freebsd.org/arm64/QEMU
    
    To boot the VM image, run:
    
        % qemu-system-aarch64 -m 4096M -cpu cortex-a57 -M virt  \
    	-bios QEMU_EFI.fd -serial telnet::4444,server -nographic \
    	-drive if=none,file=VMDISK,id=hd0 \
    	-device virtio-blk-device,drive=hd0 \
    	-device virtio-net-device,netdev=net0 \
    	-netdev user,id=net0
    
    Be sure to replace "VMDISK" with the path to the virtual machine image.
    
    === Amazon EC2 AMI Images ===
    
    FreeBSD/amd64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:
    
      eu-north-1 region: ami-010af11cb640a6dee
      ap-south-1 region: ami-02b1930180c7e1f84
      eu-west-3 region: ami-02c0fbb70c27140c9
      eu-west-2 region: ami-0a153ee6417cc762a
      eu-west-1 region: ami-0d408e28706df7df4
      ap-northeast-2 region: ami-06fb52e8cf793dd53
      ap-northeast-1 region: ami-0bf79180cdb0e6923
      sa-east-1 region: ami-0f4aff5453cb72b01
      ca-central-1 region: ami-056a0b9ce2bd839f5
      ap-southeast-1 region: ami-0f73e82a020a5137f
      ap-southeast-2 region: ami-06468078ec3e31029
      eu-central-1 region: ami-0a6e0eb4c2a169f66
      us-east-1 region: ami-0bc8f1f1ed85baa0f
      us-east-2 region: ami-041a4cee6e5445ee3
      us-west-1 region: ami-00c3ebed64c1338e2
      us-west-2 region: ami-01288513b23077913
    
    === Vagrant Images ===
    
    FreeBSD/amd64 images are available on the Hashicorp Atlas site, and can
    be installed by running:
    
        % vagrant init freebsd/FreeBSD-11.3-BETA2
        % vagrant up
    
    === Upgrading ===
    
    The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386
    systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
    FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:
    
    	# freebsd-update upgrade -r 11.3-BETA2
    
    During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by
    merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
    performed merging was done correctly.
    
    	# freebsd-update install
    
    The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before
    continuing.
    
    	# shutdown -r now
    
    After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new
    userland components:
    
    	# freebsd-update install
    
    It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible,
    especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
    FreeBSD 10.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat10x and
    other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
    into the new userland:
    
    	# shutdown -r now
    
    Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove
    stale files:
    
    	# freebsd-update install
  • FreeBSD 11.3 Beta 2 Brings Virtualization Updates, Exposes MD_CLEAR MDS Bit To Guests

    The second weekly beta of FreeBSD 11.3 is now available for testing.

    FreeBSD 11.3 should be released in July and offers up various bug fixes and other minor improvements compared to last year's 11.2 release. FreeBSD 12 remains the current stable series while new development is happening for FreeBSD 13.

  • FreeBSD 11.3-BETA2

    The second BETA build for the FreeBSD 11.3 release cycle is now available. ISO images for the amd64, armv6, arm64, i386, powerpc, powerpc64, and sparc64 architectures are available on most of our FreeBSD mirror sites.

Project Trident version 19.05 is now available!

Filed under
BSD

This is a minor update to synchronize packages and move Project Trident to the 19.05 version of TrueOS (v20190516). This brings in all of the FreeBSD security fixes for the Intel vulnerabilities that were announced last week.

Read more

FreeBSD 11.3 Beta 1

Filed under
BSD
  • FreeBSD 11.3 BETA

    24 May: The first BETA build for the FreeBSD 11.3 release cycle is now available. ISO images for the amd64, armv6, arm64, i386, powerpc, powerpc64, and sparc64 architectures are available on most of our FreeBSD mirror sites.

  • FreeBSD 11.3-BETA1 Now Available

    The first BETA build of the 11.3-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

    Installation images are available for:

    o 11.3-BETA1 amd64 GENERIC
    o 11.3-BETA1 i386 GENERIC
    o 11.3-BETA1 powerpc GENERIC
    o 11.3-BETA1 powerpc64 GENERIC64
    o 11.3-BETA1 sparc64 GENERIC
    o 11.3-BETA1 armv6 BANANAPI
    o 11.3-BETA1 armv6 BEAGLEBONE
    o 11.3-BETA1 armv6 CUBIEBOARD
    o 11.3-BETA1 armv6 CUBIEBOARD2
    o 11.3-BETA1 armv6 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
    o 11.3-BETA1 armv6 RPI-B
    o 11.3-BETA1 armv6 RPI2
    o 11.3-BETA1 armv6 PANDABOARD
    o 11.3-BETA1 armv6 WANDBOARD
    o 11.3-BETA1 aarch64 GENERIC

    Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
    console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
    freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access. Additionally,
    the root user password is set to root. It is strongly recommended
    to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
    system.

  • FreeBSD 11.3 Enters Beta Ahead Of July Release

    While FreeBSD 12 is the latest and greatest stable series since the end of last year, for those still on FreeBSD 11 there is the 11.3 update due out for release in July while this weekend the first beta was issued.

    FreeBSD 11.3 offers up the latest security updates and other stable bug fixes over FreeBSD 11.2 that was released nearly one year ago. But for those craving all the latest features and functionality, FreeBSD 12 is in release form or there is also FreeBSD 13-CURRENT.

DragonFlyBSD 5.4.3 Released With Various Fixes

Filed under
BSD

DragonFlyBSD 5.4.3 was released on Monday with just a hand full of changes over last month's 5.4.2 point release.

DragonFlyBSD 5.4.3 takes care of an SMP race condition within the PF code, fixes a FP bug in its kernel, restores the trim_enabled device sysctl, ensures the ca_root_nss certificate is installed, sets GID_TTY for non-root users by default, and stubs out pthread_equal() for its C library.

Read more

Linux Foundation, BSDs and Servers

Filed under
Linux
Server
BSD
  • Like Linux, It’s Very Hard to Create the Next Bitcoin (BTC)
  • Linux Foundation launches Urban Computing Foundation

    The Linux Foundation, best known for its stewardship of the kernel which bears its name, has announced it is branching out into the world of smart cities and autonomous vehicles through the formation of the Urban Computing Foundation.

    Originally a hobby project of then-student Linus Torvalds, the Linux kernel has grown into one of the most widely-deployed operating system kernels in history. It's used in everything from games consoles to pacemakers, supercomputing to routers, and now the Linux Foundation is looking to push it still wider with the formation of the new Urban Computing Foundation.

  • Intel Has Been Recently Ramping Up Their FreeBSD Support

    While Intel's open-source Linux support is largely stellar and was a big focus of this week's Open-Source Technology Summit in Washington, their FreeBSD support isn't nearly as polished but over the past roughly year and a half they've been establishing a FreeBSD team and working towards feature parity and supporting critical functionality for their customers.

    As written about last year, Ben Widawsky who had long been part of their Linux graphics driver team began part of the effort on improving the FreeBSD support around Intel hardware. Ben spoke Wednesday at OSTS 2019 about this FreeBSD improvement voyage.

  • DragonFlyBSD Flips On Compiler-Based Retpoline Support For Its Kernel, Also Adds SMAP/SMEP

    In addition to DragonFlyBSD seeing MDS "Zombie Load" mitigations this week, the DragonFlyBSD kernel now has better Spectre Variant Two coverage with making use of the GCC compiler support.

    DragonFlyBSD switched to GCC 8 by default at the end of last year and that allows them now to enable -mindirect-branch=thunk-inline as part of the Spectre Variant Two mitigation strategy. Their earlier GCC5 compiler didn't offer this support albeit it took them a while still to enable this compiler flag by default when compiling the kernel.

  • Roberto Alsina: Coffee As a Service Architecture

    Today I was in a meeting with recruiters (yes, really) because they want to be better at technical recruiting and they had the idea that talking to me would help them (oh, sweet summer children).

    A nice time was had by all (I hope) and at one point I was asked about what architecture was, and more specifically, about the difference between microservices and a monolith.

    Which I tried to explain using what I had at hand: coffee cups, sugar dispensers, a spoon and so on. It didn't quite work out but I kept thinking about it on my way home and ... let's try again.

    [...]

    So, that's why nowadays most people prefer to pay the performance penalty of a microservice architecture instead of using an awesome monolith.

  • IBM 'cloudifies' mainframe software pricing, adds hybrid, private cloud services

    Specifically IBM rolled out Tailored Fit Pricing for the IBM Z mainframe which offers two consumption-based pricing models that can help customers cope with ever-changing workload – and hence software – costs.

    Tailored Fit Pricing removes the need for complex and restrictive capping, which typically weakens responsiveness and can impact service level availability, IBM said. IBM’s standard monthly mainframe licensing model calculates costs as a “rolling four-hour average” (R4HA) which would determine cost based on a customer’s peak usage during the month. Customers would many time cap usage to keep costs down, experts said

    Systems can now be configured to support optimal response times and service level agreements, rather than artificially slowing down workloads to manage software licensing costs, IBM stated.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

When Diverse Network ASICs Meet A Unifying Operating System

And it has also been a decade since switch upstart Arista Networks launched its Extensible Operating System, or EOS, which is derived from Linux. [...] The cross-platform nature of ArcOS, coupled with its ability to run in any function on the network, could turn out to be the key differentiator. A lot of these other NOSes were point solutions that could only be deployed in certain parts of the network, and that just creates animosity with the incumbent vendors that dominate the rest of the networking stack. Given the mission-critical nature of networking in the modern datacenter, it costs a great deal to qualify a new network operating system, and it can take a lot of time. If ArcOS can run across more platforms, qualify faster, and do more jobs in the network, then, says Garg, it has a good chance of shaking up switching and routing. “That totally changes the business conversation and the TCO advantages that we can bring to a customer across the entirety of their network.” Read more

Server: Kubernetes/OpenShift, OpenStack, and Red Hat's Ansible

  • 9 steps to awesome with Kubernetes/OpenShift presented by Burr Sutter

    Burr Sutter gave a terrific talk in India in July, where he laid out the terms, systems and processes needed to setup Kubernetes for developers. This is an introductory presentation, which may be useful for your larger community of Kubernetes users once you’ve already setup User Provisioned Infrastructure (UPI) in Red Hat OpenShift for them, though it does go into the deeper details of actually running the a cluster. To follow along, Burr created an accompanying GitHub repository, so you too can learn how to setup an awesome Kubernetes cluster in just 9 steps.

  • Weaveworks Named a Top Kubernetes Contributor

    But anyone who knows the history of Weaveworks might not be too surprised by this. Weaveworks has been a major champion of Kubernetes since the very beginning. It might not be too much of a coincidence that Weaveworks was incorporated only a few weeks after Kubernetes was open sourced, five years ago. In addition to this, the very first elected chair of the CNCF’s Technical Oversight Committee, responsible for technical leadership to the Cloud Native Foundation was also headed up by our CEO, Alexis Richardson(@monadic) (soon to be replaced by the awesome Liz Rice (@lizrice) of Aqua Security).

  • Improving trust in the cloud with OpenStack and AMD SEV

    This post contains an exciting announcement, but first I need to provide some context! Ever heard that joke “the cloud is just someone else’s computer”? Of course it’s a gross over-simplification, but there’s more than a grain of truth in it. And that raises the question: if your applications are running in someone else’s data-centre, how can you trust that they’re not being snooped upon, or worse, invasively tampered with?

  • Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15 Enhances Infrastructure Security and Cloud-Native Integration Across the Open Hybrid Cloud

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the general availability of Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15, the latest version of its highly scalable and agile cloud Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) solution. Based on the OpenStack community’s "Stein" release, Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15 adds performance and cloud security enhancements and expands the platform’s ecosystem of supported hardware, helping IT organizations to more quickly and more securely support demanding production workloads. Given the role of Linux as the foundation for hybrid cloud, customers can also benefit from a more secure, flexible and intelligent Linux operating system underpinning their private cloud deployments with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.

  • Red Hat Ansible Automation Accelerates Past Major Adoption Milestone, Now Manages More Than Four Million Customer Systems Worldwide

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that more than four million customer systems worldwide are now automated by Red Hat Ansible Automation. Customers, including Energy Market Company, Microsoft, Reserve Bank of New Zealand and Surescripts all use Red Hat Ansible Automation to automate and orchestrate their IT operations, helping to expand automation across IT stacks. According to a blog post by Chris Gardner with Forrester Research, who was the author of The Forrester Wave™: Infrastructure Automation Platforms, Q3 2019, "Infrastructure automation isn’t just on-premises or the cloud. It’s at the edge and everywhere in between."1 Since its launch in 2013, Red Hat Ansible Automation has provided a single tool to help organizations automate across IT operations and development, including infrastructure, networks, cloud, security and beyond.

Top 15+ Best Script Writing Software for Linux in 2019

Script writing software is designed to play a vital role for writers from different writing sectors. As a newbie, it may not be simple to use. But, after a certain period, it comes handy for creating scripts for films, novels, and television programs. Linux has to offer a bunch of tools for script writing for both beginners and professionals. There is a wide range of applications that are open source and free. Moreover, if you want to get some extra bit of advanced features, you may need to spend some bucks. Read more