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BSD

BSD: DragonFlyBSD, ZFS vs. OpenZFS, FreeBSD Code

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BSD

OpenBSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD
  • OpenBSD Adds Initial User-Space Support For Vulkan

    Somewhat surprisingly, OpenBSD has added the Vulkan library and ICD loader support as their newest port.

    This new graphics/vulkan-loader port provides the generic Vulkan library and ICD support that is the common code for Vulkan implementations on the system. This doesn't enable any Vulkan hardware drivers or provide something new not available elsewhere, but is rare seeing Vulkan work among the BSDs. There is also in ports the related components like the SPIR-V headers and tools, glsllang, and the Vulkan tools and validation layers.

  • SSH gets protection against side channel attacks

    Implementation-wise, keys are encrypted "shielded" when loaded and then automatically and transparently unshielded when used for signatures or when being saved/serialised.

    Hopefully we can remove this in a few years time when computer architecture has become less unsafe.

  • doas environmental security

    Ted Unangst (tedu@) posted to the tech@ mailing list regarding recent changes to environment handling in doas (in -current): [...]

FreeBSD 11.3-RC2 Now Available

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BSD

The second RC build of the 11.3-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 11.3-RC2 amd64 GENERIC
o 11.3-RC2 i386 GENERIC
o 11.3-RC2 powerpc GENERIC
o 11.3-RC2 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 11.3-RC2 sparc64 GENERIC
o 11.3-RC2 armv6 BANANAPI
o 11.3-RC2 armv6 BEAGLEBONE
o 11.3-RC2 armv6 CUBIEBOARD
o 11.3-RC2 armv6 CUBIEBOARD2
o 11.3-RC2 armv6 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
o 11.3-RC2 armv6 RPI-B
o 11.3-RC2 armv6 RPI2
o 11.3-RC2 armv6 PANDABOARD
o 11.3-RC2 armv6 WANDBOARD
o 11.3-RC2 aarch64 GENERIC

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/11.3/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/11.3" branch.

A summary of changes since 11.3-RC1 includes:

o Updates to the ixl(4) and ixlv(4) drivers.

A list of changes since 11.2-RELEASE is available in the releng/11.3
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/releases/11.3R/relnotes.html

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 11.3-RELEASE cycle progresses.

=== Virtual Machine Disk Images ===

VM disk images are available for the amd64, i386, and aarch64
architectures.  Disk images may be downloaded from the following URL
(or any of the FreeBSD download mirrors):

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/VM-IMAGES/11.3-RC2/

The partition layout is:

    ~ 16 kB - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    ~ 1 GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    ~ 20 GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image
formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB and 165 MB
respectively (amd64/i386), decompressing to a 21 GB sparse image.

Note regarding arm64/aarch64 virtual machine images: a modified QEMU EFI
loader file is needed for qemu-system-aarch64 to be able to boot the
virtual machine images.  See this page for more information:

    https://wiki.freebsd.org/arm64/QEMU

To boot the VM image, run:

    % qemu-system-aarch64 -m 4096M -cpu cortex-a57 -M virt  \
	-bios QEMU_EFI.fd -serial telnet::4444,server -nographic \
	-drive if=none,file=VMDISK,id=hd0 \
	-device virtio-blk-device,drive=hd0 \
	-device virtio-net-device,netdev=net0 \
	-netdev user,id=net0

Be sure to replace "VMDISK" with the path to the virtual machine image.

=== Amazon EC2 AMI Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  eu-north-1 region: ami-091a9d377d956c519
  ap-south-1 region: ami-0fa381eb7dd65b236
  eu-west-3 region: ami-0888c48fcbc7ec3b9
  eu-west-2 region: ami-01d9ee1b7ba0aaf87
  eu-west-1 region: ami-072313e0a896f9fc3
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-081a9854f2575823e
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-027ab7629095b2419
  sa-east-1 region: ami-0ed1e9346b072b7fa
  ca-central-1 region: ami-0effcf973bbde0b80
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-06fc8fd0e39f4a6e8
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-0e68f9d80df9828aa
  eu-central-1 region: ami-042016143d5bf5261
  us-east-1 region: ami-0ad4a06d874497067
  us-east-2 region: ami-0efb20b4a888c1bd1
  us-west-1 region: ami-0b5b96c925cec68fe
  us-west-2 region: ami-0f672651aa001cc97

=== Vagrant Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 images are available on the Hashicorp Atlas site, and can
be installed by running:

    % vagrant init freebsd/FreeBSD-11.3-RC2
    % vagrant up

=== Upgrading ===

The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386
systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

	# freebsd-update upgrade -r 11.3-RC2

During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by
merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
performed merging was done correctly.

	# freebsd-update install

The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before
continuing.

	# shutdown -r now

After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new
userland components:

	# freebsd-update install

It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible,
especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
FreeBSD 11.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat11x and
other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
into the new userland:

	# shutdown -r now

Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove
stale files:

	# freebsd-update install

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UNIX/BSD: ADGS and "Unix-Based Environment", HAMMER vs. HAMMER2 Benchmarks (DragonFlyBSD)

Filed under
BSD
  • QF RDI's ‘Innovation Coupon’ funding initiative to support private sector

    Qatar Foundation Research, Development, and Innovation (QF RDI) has marked the launch of its new funding initiative, ‘Innovation Coupon’, by signing an agreement with its first beneficiary, ADGS – a local private sector SME that sells a suite of products that utilise artificial intelligence (AI), behavioural biometrics, and emergent behaviour.

    [...]

    ADGS is working to port its security solution from a Windows to a Unix-based environment. The ADGS team will use QF RDI’s award to employ external support in order to allow the company to continue its expansion.

  • HAMMER vs. HAMMER2 Benchmarks On DragonFlyBSD 5.6

    With the newly released DragonFlyBSD 5.6 there are improvements to its original HAMMER2 file-system to the extent that it's now selected by its installer as the default file-system choice for new installations. Curious how the performance now compares between HAMMER and HAMMER2, here are some initial benchmarks on an NVMe solid-state drive using DragonFlyBSD 5.6.0.

Release of DragonFly BSD 5.6

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BSD
  • DragonFly BSD 5.6

    DragonFly version 5.6 brings an improved virtual memory system, updates to radeon and ttm, and performance improvements for HAMMER2.

    The details of all commits between the 5.4 and 5.6 branches are available in the associated commit messages for 5.6.0rc1 and 5.6.0.

  • DragonFlyBSD 5.6 Released With VM System, HAMMER2 In Good Shape

    DragonFlyBSD 5.6 is now available as the latest major update to this popular BSD operating system.

    DragonFlyBSD 5.6 brings the HAMMER2 file-system by default following numerous improvements this cycle to HAMMER2 to put it now in comparable/better standing than HAMMER1. HAMMER1 though remains available for those interested. I'll have out some new HAMMER2 DragonFlyBSD benchmarks shortly.

Compilers: GCC 10 and LLVM Clang 9.0

Filed under
GNU
BSD
  • GCC 10 Lands Support For Targeting TI's 32-bit PRU Processor

    New to the GCC 10 compiler code-base this week is a port for the Texas Instruments Programmable Real-Time Unit (PRU) processor found on various boards, including the likes of the BeagleBone Arm SBCs.

    The TI programmable real-time unit (PRU) is a processor on some TI boards that offers two 32-bit cores running at 200MHz. The PRU offers single-cycle I/O access and full access to the system's internal memory and peripherals. Texas Instruments has offered a proprietary toolchain for writing Assembly code to run on the PRU while now an independent developer has landed the GCC port for targeting this unique processor.

  • Clang-Scan-Deps Lands In Clang 9.0 For Much Faster Dependency Scanning

    Landing this week in the LLVM Clang 9.0 development code-base is the new clang-scan-deps tool for much faster scanning of files for dependencies compared to the traditional pre-processor based approach.

    Development of clang-scan-deps was led by Apple's compiler team and delivers up to around ten (10) times faster performance for scanning of dependencies/modules before compiling compared to the pre-processor-based scanning.

FreeBSD 11.3-RC1 Now Available

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BSD

The first RC build of the 11.3-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Read more

Also: FreeBSD 11.3 Release Candidate Brings Different Fixes

Audiocasts/Shows: BSD Now (DragonFlyBSD/OpenBSD/NetBSD), The Linux Link Tech Show, and FLOSS Weekly

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • Contention Reduction | BSD Now 302

    DragonFlyBSD’s kernel optimizations pay off, differences between OpenBSD and Linux, NetBSD 2019 Google Summer of Code project list, Reducing that contention, fnaify 1.3 released, vmctl(8): CLI syntax changes, and things that Linux distributions should not do when packaging.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 813
  • FLOSS Weekly 533: faastRuby

    faastRuby allows you to build serverless applications using functions to deploy to any cloud and scale without cold starts. You can use both Ruby and Crystal in the same appl and schedule periodic runs in plain English and Cron syntax. It allows for real-time cloud syn from your favorite code editor as well.

Ubuntu Server development summary – 11 June 2019

Filed under
Server
BSD
Ubuntu

The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list or visit the Ubuntu Server discourse hub for more discussion.

Read more

Also: DragonFlyBSD 5.6 RC1 Released With VM Optimizations, HAMMER2 By Default

DragonFlyBSD Now Defaulting To HAMMER2 File-System and Playing Bluetooth Audio with OpenBSD

Filed under
BSD
  • DragonFlyBSD Now Defaulting To HAMMER2 File-System By Default

    After being an experimental option in DragonFlyBSD for more than the past half-decade, HAMMER2 is the new default file-system of this FreeBSD derivative. 

  • Playing Bluetooth Audio with OpenBSD

     

    OpenBSD removed Bluetooth support in 2014, so officially there is no way to connect a Bluetooth to your OpenBSD system. However, jcs@ posted on Twitter that he found a simple way to play audio via Bluetooth. He recommended the Creative BT-W2 USB dongle.

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Android Leftovers

When Diverse Network ASICs Meet A Unifying Operating System

And it has also been a decade since switch upstart Arista Networks launched its Extensible Operating System, or EOS, which is derived from Linux. [...] The cross-platform nature of ArcOS, coupled with its ability to run in any function on the network, could turn out to be the key differentiator. A lot of these other NOSes were point solutions that could only be deployed in certain parts of the network, and that just creates animosity with the incumbent vendors that dominate the rest of the networking stack. Given the mission-critical nature of networking in the modern datacenter, it costs a great deal to qualify a new network operating system, and it can take a lot of time. If ArcOS can run across more platforms, qualify faster, and do more jobs in the network, then, says Garg, it has a good chance of shaking up switching and routing. “That totally changes the business conversation and the TCO advantages that we can bring to a customer across the entirety of their network.” Read more

Server: Kubernetes/OpenShift, OpenStack, and Red Hat's Ansible

  • 9 steps to awesome with Kubernetes/OpenShift presented by Burr Sutter

    Burr Sutter gave a terrific talk in India in July, where he laid out the terms, systems and processes needed to setup Kubernetes for developers. This is an introductory presentation, which may be useful for your larger community of Kubernetes users once you’ve already setup User Provisioned Infrastructure (UPI) in Red Hat OpenShift for them, though it does go into the deeper details of actually running the a cluster. To follow along, Burr created an accompanying GitHub repository, so you too can learn how to setup an awesome Kubernetes cluster in just 9 steps.

  • Weaveworks Named a Top Kubernetes Contributor

    But anyone who knows the history of Weaveworks might not be too surprised by this. Weaveworks has been a major champion of Kubernetes since the very beginning. It might not be too much of a coincidence that Weaveworks was incorporated only a few weeks after Kubernetes was open sourced, five years ago. In addition to this, the very first elected chair of the CNCF’s Technical Oversight Committee, responsible for technical leadership to the Cloud Native Foundation was also headed up by our CEO, Alexis Richardson(@monadic) (soon to be replaced by the awesome Liz Rice (@lizrice) of Aqua Security).

  • Improving trust in the cloud with OpenStack and AMD SEV

    This post contains an exciting announcement, but first I need to provide some context! Ever heard that joke “the cloud is just someone else’s computer”? Of course it’s a gross over-simplification, but there’s more than a grain of truth in it. And that raises the question: if your applications are running in someone else’s data-centre, how can you trust that they’re not being snooped upon, or worse, invasively tampered with?

  • Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15 Enhances Infrastructure Security and Cloud-Native Integration Across the Open Hybrid Cloud

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the general availability of Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15, the latest version of its highly scalable and agile cloud Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) solution. Based on the OpenStack community’s "Stein" release, Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15 adds performance and cloud security enhancements and expands the platform’s ecosystem of supported hardware, helping IT organizations to more quickly and more securely support demanding production workloads. Given the role of Linux as the foundation for hybrid cloud, customers can also benefit from a more secure, flexible and intelligent Linux operating system underpinning their private cloud deployments with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.

  • Red Hat Ansible Automation Accelerates Past Major Adoption Milestone, Now Manages More Than Four Million Customer Systems Worldwide

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that more than four million customer systems worldwide are now automated by Red Hat Ansible Automation. Customers, including Energy Market Company, Microsoft, Reserve Bank of New Zealand and Surescripts all use Red Hat Ansible Automation to automate and orchestrate their IT operations, helping to expand automation across IT stacks. According to a blog post by Chris Gardner with Forrester Research, who was the author of The Forrester Wave™: Infrastructure Automation Platforms, Q3 2019, "Infrastructure automation isn’t just on-premises or the cloud. It’s at the edge and everywhere in between."1 Since its launch in 2013, Red Hat Ansible Automation has provided a single tool to help organizations automate across IT operations and development, including infrastructure, networks, cloud, security and beyond.

Top 15+ Best Script Writing Software for Linux in 2019

Script writing software is designed to play a vital role for writers from different writing sectors. As a newbie, it may not be simple to use. But, after a certain period, it comes handy for creating scripts for films, novels, and television programs. Linux has to offer a bunch of tools for script writing for both beginners and professionals. There is a wide range of applications that are open source and free. Moreover, if you want to get some extra bit of advanced features, you may need to spend some bucks. Read more