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BSD

BSD: FreeBSD Development News and BSD Now 294

Filed under
BSD
  • CFT for FreeBSD + ZoL

    We're pleased to make available images allowing testing of FreeBSD using ZFS on Linux. During this development cycle, the ZoL code has been made portable, and available in the ports tree as sysutils/zol and sysutils/zol-kmod, for userland/kernel bits respectively. While some have used these for testing, we felt it necessary to generate some installation images which are an easier method of getting up and started using ZoL. These images are built against FreeBSD 12-stable and 13-HEAD and will install a world / kernel with the base system ZFS disabled and the sysutils/zol ports pre-installed.

    It is possible to these with both UFS or ZFS on root, and we're looking for feedback on any stability issues or other regressions that you see vs the legacy ZFS in base.

  • FreeBSD Images Reworked With ZFS On Linux Code Up For Testing

    Last year FreeBSD developers decided to re-base their ZFS file-system code based on the "ZFS On Linux" port rather than the Illumos source tree where they originally had been acquiring the support for this BSD. There's now FreeBSD 12 and FreeBSD 13/Head images available for testing of this re-worked ZFS file-system support.

    Kris Moore of iXsystems has been involved in this large undertaking to get the FreeBSD ZFS code re-based over ZoL. They are still working on this big effort but have now spun some FreeBSD 12-STABLE and 13-HEAD installation images for those easily wanting to test out this ZoL'ed FreeBSD.

  • The SSH Tarpit | BSD Now 294

    A PI-powered Plan 9 cluster, an SSH tarpit, rdist for when Ansible is too much, falling in love with OpenBSD again, how I created my first FreeBSD port, the Tilde Institute of OpenBSD education and more.

OpenSSH 8.0 released

Filed under
Security
BSD

This release contains mitigation for a weakness in the scp(1) tool
and protocol (CVE-2019-6111): when copying files from a remote system
to a local directory, scp(1) did not verify that the filenames that
the server sent matched those requested by the client. This could
allow a hostile server to create or clobber unexpected local files
with attacker-controlled content.

This release adds client-side checking that the filenames sent from
the server match the command-line request,

The scp protocol is outdated, inflexible and not readily fixed. We
recommend the use of more modern protocols like sftp and rsync for
file transfer instead.

Read more

GhostBSD 19.04 Release Switches To LightDM, Based On FreeBSD 13.0-CURRENT

Filed under
BSD

With TrueOS (formerly PC-BSD) shifting away from its desktop FreeBSD focus, the GhostBSD project remains one of the nice "desktop BSD" operating system offerings. GhostBSD 19.04 is now available in MATE and Xfce desktop spins.

GhostBSD 19.04 is based on FreeBSD 13.0-CURRENT while officially using the MATE desktop but also providing a community Xfce desktop image. GhostBSD 19.04 switches to LightDM as its display/log-in manager, supports ZFS now when using the MBR mode in the installer, drops gksu, and has a number of bug fixes especially to its installer among other packages.

Read more

Also: t2k19 Hackathon Report: Stefan Sperling on 802.11? progress, suspend/resume and more

BSD, GNU and SUSE Events

Filed under
GNU
OSS
SUSE
BSD
  • t2k19 Hackathon Report: Ken Westerback on dhclient, disklabel, and more
  • Purism at LibrePlanet 2019 – Showcasing the Librem 5 Phone

    This year’s edition of LibrePlanet went on so well, we had people stopping by to ask questions before the conference was open for the day.

    Purism’s booth was busy, and people were happy to see us. Nearly everyone we talked to had been following our progress, and everyone was excited to see things in-person. We showcased the fourth version of Librem laptops, and made regular demonstrations of both PureBoot on a Librem 13v4 and Librem Key. Above all, we drew a lot of excitement around the in-person viewing of the Librem 5 devkit. So much excitement, we really wanted to write about the commotion caused by the Librem 5 development – and specially about the devkit demonstration – not only among the audience but also within our own team members.

    The Librem 5 phone may still be months away from delivery, but the Librem 5 devkit is under very rapid development. Showcasing our progress is something we’re very proud of, so at the first day of LibrePlanet we whet the appetite of audience members by showcasing sub ten-second boot times from powered-off state to unlock-screen… and we also showed off the initial application support of calling, settings, chat/sms, and browser.

  • SUSECON – Cloud Talkin’

    With over 1,000 attendees from 45 different countries, SUSECON was a truly global affair with a uniquely country twist.

NetBSD's New Hypervisor and GhostBSD 19.04 RC4

Filed under
BSD

WireGuard Snapshot `0.0.20190406` Available

Filed under
Software
Security
BSD

Hello,

A new snapshot, `0.0.20190406`, has been tagged in the git repository.

Please note that this snapshot is, like the rest of the project at this point
in time, experimental, and does not constitute a real release that would be
considered secure and bug-free. WireGuard is generally thought to be fairly
stable, and most likely will not crash your computer (though it may).
However, as this is a pre-release snapshot, it comes with no guarantees, and
its security is not yet to be depended on; it is not applicable for CVEs.

With all that said, if you'd like to test this snapshot out, there are a
few relevant changes.

== Changes ==

  * allowedips: initialize list head when removing intermediate nodes
  
  Fix for an important regression in removing allowed IPs from the last
  snapshot. We have new test cases to catch these in the future as well.
  
  * wg-quick: freebsd: rebreak interface loopback, while fixing localhost
  * wg-quick: freebsd: export TMPDIR when restoring and don't make empty
  
  Two fixes for FreeBSD which have already been backported into ports.
  
  * tools: genkey: account for short reads of /dev/urandom
  * tools: add support for Haiku
  
  The tools now support Haiku! Maybe somebody is working on a WireGuard
  implementation for it?
  
  * tools: warn if an AllowedIP has a nonzero host part
  
  If you try to run `wg set wg0 peer ... allowed-ips 192.168.1.82/24`, wg(8)
  will now print a warning. Even though we mask this automatically down to
  192.168.1.0/24, usually when people specify it like this, it's a mistake.
  
  * wg-quick: add 'strip' subcommand
  
  The new strip subcommand prints the config file to stdout after stripping
  it of all wg-quick-specific options. This enables tricks such as:
  `wg addconf $DEV <(wg-quick strip $DEV)`.
  
  * tools: avoid unneccessary next_peer assignments in sort_peers()
  
  Small C optimization the compiler was probably already doing.
  
  * peerlookup: rename from hashtables
  * allowedips: do not use __always_inline
  * device: use skb accessor functions where possible
  
  Suggested tweaks from Dave Miller.
  
  * qemu: set framewarn 1280 for 64bit and 1024 for 32bit
  
  These should indicate to us more clearly when we cross the most strict stack
  thresholds expected when using recent compilers with the kernel.
  
  * blake2s: simplify
  * blake2s: remove outlen parameter from final
  
  The blake2s implementation has been simplified, since we don't use any of the
  fancy tree hashing parameters or the like. We also no longer separate the
  output length at initialization time from the output length at finalization
  time.
  
  * global: the _bh variety of rcu helpers have been unified
  * compat: nf_nat_core.h was removed upstream
  * compat: backport skb_mark_not_on_list
  
  The usual assortment of compat fixes for Linux 5.1.

This snapshot contains commits from: Jason A. Donenfeld, Luis Ressel, Samuel 
Neves, Bruno Wolff III, and Alexander von Gluck IV.

As always, the source is available at https://git.zx2c4.com/WireGuard/ and
information about the project is available at https://www.wireguard.com/ .

This snapshot is available in compressed tarball form here:
  https://git.zx2c4.com/WireGuard/snapshot/WireGuard-0.0.20190406.tar.xz
  SHA2-256: 2f06f3adf70b95e74a7736a22dcf6e9ef623b311a15b7d55b5474e57c3d0415b
  BLAKE2b-256: 787a01fa3d6a800d7376a04ff57dd16d884a7d3cb99d2f91bfc59895ab759200

A PGP signature of that file decompressed is available here:
  https://git.zx2c4.com/WireGuard/snapshot/WireGuard-0.0.20190406.tar.asc
  Signing key: AB9942E6D4A4CFC3412620A749FC7012A5DE03AE

If you're a snapshot package maintainer, please bump your package version. If
you're a user, the WireGuard team welcomes any and all feedback on this latest
snapshot.

Finally, WireGuard development thrives on donations. By popular demand, we
have a webpage for this: https://www.wireguard.com/donations/

Thank you,
Jason Donenfeld

Read more

Also: New WireGuard Snapshot Offers FreeBSD Fixes, Other Tweaks

LLVM Clang 9.0 Adds "-ftime-trace" To Produce Useful Time Trace Profiling Data

Filed under
Development
BSD

LLVM has merged a very useful feature for the Clang 9.0 release this autumn: the -ftime-trace feature allows producing time trace profiling data in a friendly format that is useful for developers to better understand where the compiler is spending most of its time and other areas for improvement.

Clang has already supported -ftime-report for printing time summaries for each stage of the compilation process while -ftime-trace yields much more useful data. The output of -ftime-trace is JSON-based profiling outputs that can be loaded into Chrome's chrome://tracing visualizer. This data shows how much time LLVM/Clang is spending on compiling each file, down to the function granularity.

Read more

DragonFlyBSD Receives Initial FUSE Port For File-Systems In User-Space

Filed under
BSD

Tomohiro Kusumi has contributed an initial FUSE implementation to DragonFlyBSD for implementing file-systems in user-space support.

The design is based roughly on FreeBSD code but is a cleanly written implementation for allowing user-space file-systems to work on this BSD. This initial FUSE support isn't designed to be API/ABI compatible with the FreeBSD code due to different sysctls and other factors.

Read more

BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD

Release of HardenedBSD 1200058.4 and BSD Now 290

Filed under
BSD
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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: AMDGPU and X.Org Elections

  • amdgpu drm-next-5.2
  • AMDGPU Has Another Round Of Updates Ahead Of Linux 5.2
    Feature work on DRM-Next for the Linux 5.2 kernel cycle is winding down while today AMD has sent in what could be their last round of AMDGPU feature updates for this next kernel release. Building off their earlier Linux 5.2 feature work are more updates. That earlier round brought new SMU11 enablement code for Vega 20, various other Vega 20 features, HMM preparations, and other code changes.
  • 2019 Election Round 2 voting OPEN
    To all X.Org Foundation Members: The round 2 of X.Org Foundation's annual election is now open and will remain open until 23:59 UTC on 2 May 2019. Four of the eight director seats are open during this election, with the four nominees receiving the highest vote totals serving as directors for two year terms. There were six candidates nominated. For a complete list of the candidates and their personal statements, please visit the 2019 X.Org Elections page at https://www.x.org/wiki/BoardOfDirectors/Elections/2019/ The new bylaw changes were approved in the first round of voting. Here are some instructions on how to cast your vote: Login to the membership system at: https://members.x.org/ If you do not remember your password, you can click on the "lost password" button and enter your user name. An e-mail will be sent to you with your password. If you have problems with the membership system, please e-mail membership at x.org. When you login you will see an "Active Ballots" section with the "X.Org 2019 Elections Round 2" ballot. When you click on that you will be presented with a page describing the ballot. At the bottom you will find a number of dropdowns that let you rank your candidates by order of preference. For the election: There is a pull-down selection box for 1st choice, 2nd, choice, and so on. Pick your candidates top to bottom in order of preference, avoiding duplicates. After you have completed your ballot, click the "Cast vote" button. Note that once you click this button, your votes will be cast and you will not be able to make further changes, so please make sure you are satisfied with your votes before clicking the "Cast vote" button. After you click the "Vote" button, the system will verify that you have completed a valid ballot. If your ballot is invalid (e.g., you duplicated a selection or did not answer the By-laws approval question), it will return you to the previous voting page. If your ballot is valid, your votes will be recorded and the system will show you a notice that your votes were cast. Note that the election will close at 23:59 UTC on 2 May 2019. At that time, the election committee will count the votes and present the results to the current board for validation. After the current board validates the results, the election committee will present the results to the Members. Harry, on behalf of the X.Org elections committee
  • It's Time To Re-Vote Following The Botched 2019 X.Org Elections
    While there were the recent X.Org Foundation board elections, a do-over was needed as their new custom-written voting software wasn't properly recording votes... So here's now your reminder to re-vote in these X.Org elections. At least with the initial round of voting they reached a super majority and the ballot question of whether the X.Org Foundation should formally fold FreeDesktop.org into its umbrella worked and that X.Org + FreeDesktop.org hook-up passed so all is well on that front. But for the Board of Directors elections, that's where re-voting is needed with the voting software that now correctly records the votes.

today's howtos

Games: Lutris and More

  • Epic Games Store Now On Linux Thanks To Lutris
    While the Epic Games Store itself is not officially supported by the open source Linux operating system, a third-party gaming client has now made sure that you can access the store and launcher on your own distro. The Epic Games Store is now accessible on Linux via the Lutris Gaming client. The client is available to all Linux users, who in the past has provided the same users a way to play PC games without the need to have Windows installed in their machines. Although Linux is not necessarily the go-to platform when it comes to PC gaming, there is a very niche audience dedicated to making the platform work in favor of open-source and to counteract what could be perceived as a heavily Windows-biased PC gaming community. Linux gaming is somewhat tedious to the relatively casual or normal user, although there are some within the Linux community that advertise and try to foster its growth in terms of gaming, as there are some games that can run better on the operating system. That is to say, if you have a lot of patience to try and make it work.
  • You Died but a Necromancer revived you is good fun in a small package
    Sometimes, simplicity is what makes a game and in the case of You Died BaNRY that's very true. The game has little depth to it but makes up for that in just how frantic and fun it can be. The entire gameplay is just you (or you and friends) attempting to cross a small level filled with platforms, spikes and all sorts of crazy traps. It's ridiculously easy to get into as well, since the controls are so basic all you need to worry about is your movement.
  • Forager is a weirdly addictive casual grinding game that has mined into my heart
    I'm not usually one for games that have you endlessly wander around, collect resources, build a little and repeat but Forager is so ridiculously charming it's lovely.
  • DragonRuby Game Toolkit, a cross-platform way to make games with Ruby
    Now for something a little different! Ryan "Icculus" Gordon, a name known for many Linux ports and SDL2 teamed up with indie developer Amir Rajan to create a new cross-platform toolkit. Why was it created? Well, in a nutshell they both "hate the complexity of today's engines" and this toolkit was actually made to help ship A Dark Room for the Nintendo Switch, which shows how versatile it is.

10+ Open Source Software Writing Tools That Every Writer Should Know

Being a professional writer requires two key things to help ensure success: commitment and support. The former comes from the writer, and the latter comes from the tools he (or she) uses to get the job done. Below is a list of 11 great and lesser-known writing tools or apps, many of which are free and open-source, that can help improve the quality of your writing and make you a more productive and successful writer. Read more