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BSD

Videos/Shows: Command Line Heroes, New in Invidious (YouTube), BSDNow, and Ubuntu Podcast

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GNU
Linux
BSD
  • Command Line Heroes: Season 8: Robot as Servant

    The 1980s promised robotic servants were in reach. They’d clean up our houses. Bring us drinks. Usher in an era of leisure. We didn’t get robot butlers. But if we look around, we’ll find an army of robotic servants already automating away domestic drudgery.

  • No The Steam Deck Won't Play Every Game - Invidious

    Due to some early information floating around some outlets reported that the Steam Deck will play every single game out there but anyone who has played games on Linux knows that would be impossible, proton is frankly not at this state.

  • JC's Linux Notes - Invidious

    A screencast in which we take a look at notes about Linux I have saved over the last few years.

  • GNOME redesign, Manjaro Cinnamon goes Vivaldi, and Steam Deck hype deflation - Linux news - Invidious
  • BSDNow 420: OpenBSD makes life better

    Choosing The Right ZFS Pool Layout, changes in OpenBSD that make life better, GhostBSD 21.09.06 ISO's now available, Fair Internet bandwidth management with OpenBSD, NetBSD wifi router project update, NetBSD on the Apple M1, HardenedBSD August Status Report, FreeBSD Journal on Wireless and Desktop, and more.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S14E28 – Tanks Rewarding Gender [Ed: Ubuntu Podcast will end soon. So they decided to push proprietary software like Windows and DRM like Steam.]

    This week we’ve been playing with Steam and the Windows Terminal. We look back at how Ubuntu and evolved over the years, bring you some command line love and go over all your feedback.

    It’s Season 14 Episode 28 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

GhostBSD 21.09.06 ISO's now available

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BSD

I am happy to announce the new ISO 21.09.06. This new ISO contains the switch from OpenRC to FreeBSD rc.d and numerous fixes and improvements.

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Audiocasts/Shows: BSDNow, TLLTS, and Bad Voltage

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GNU
Linux
BSD

NetBSD wifi project status update

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BSD
  • wifi project status update

    After initial work on the wifi renewal branch went quite fast and smooth, things have slowed down a bit in the last few months.

    Most of the slow down was due to me not being available for this type of work for unexpectedly long times - a problem that should be fixed now.

  • NetBSD Continues Long Overdue Push To Modernize Their WiFi Drivers - Phoronix

    Started back in 2018 was an effort by the NetBSD project to update their operating system WiFi drivers by re-syncing more code from FreeBSD and making various improvements. Three years later the work has yet to be merged but after stalling for some time is back to being worked on by interested developers.

    The WiFi renewal effort by NetBSD has been working to support newer WiFi standards, provide better SMP support, and handling other wireless networking features. The WiFi renewal effort was restarted last year though developer Martin Husemann noted the progress has slowed down a bit in recent months.

OpenSSH 8.7 released

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BSD

OpenSSH 8.7 has been released. Changes include steps toward deprecating scp and using the SFTP protocol for file transfers instead, changes to remote-to-remote copies (they go through the local host by default now), a stricter configuration-file parser, and more.

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NetBSD Explained: The Unix System That Can Run on Anything

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BSD

NetBSD is an open-source operating system. Like Linux, NetBSD aims for broad compatibility with Unix, offering similar utilities and behavior.

NetBSD is based on the Berkeley Software Distribution version of Unix, hence the "BSD" in the name. It's a branch off of the 386/BSD release that supported PCs in the early 1990s.

Where FreeBSD focuses on the PC platform and OpenBSD focuses on security, NetBSD focuses on portability to different platforms. While NetBSD might look like another Linux distribution, the entire system, including the kernel and user utilities, is developed together as a whole. This contrasts with the way Linux distributions cobble together components from multiple sources.

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OPNsense 21.7

Filed under
Security
BSD
  • OPNsense 21.7 released

    For more than 6 and a half years, OPNsense is driving innovation through
    modularising and hardening the open source firewall, with simple and reliable
    firmware upgrades, multi-language support, fast adoption of upstream software
    updates as well as clear and stable 2-Clause BSD licensing.

    21.7, nicknamed "Noble Nightingale", is one of the largest iterations of
    code changes in our recent history. It will also be the last release on
    HardenedBSD 12.1. We are planning to start the work on FreeBSD 13 as soon
    as next week for the 22.1 series.

    The installer was replaced to offer native ZFS installations and prevent
    glitches in virtual machines using UEFI. Firmware updates were partially
    redesigned and the UI layout consolidated between static and MVC pages.
    The live log now contains the actual rule ID to avoid mismatches after
    adjusting your ruleset and the firewall aliases now also support wildcard
    netmasks. For a complete list of changes see below.

  • OPNsense 21.7 Released With New Installer Offering Better ZFS Support - Phoronix

    OPNsense as the FreeBSD/HardenedBSD-based firewall and routing platform long ago forked from pfSense is out with its newest major release.

    OPNsense 21.7 is "one of the largest iterations of code changes" in their recent history but is still based on HardenedBSD 12.1, the BSD effort around further security hardening of FreeBSD 12.1. OPNsense developers now following this release are beginning to transition to FreeBSD 13 for their OPNsense 22.1 release due out early next year.

  • OPNsense® 21.7 "Noble Nightingale" released

    With over 1000 commits in its core and plugin repository since the last major, this 14th major release is again packed with improvements, new and updated plugins as well as new drivers such as the new AMD XGBE driver.

    Amongst the improvements are the newly designed - API enabled - firewall states diagnostics, firewall live log template support and a full firmware update revamp.

BSD: FreeBSD and OpenBSD

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BSD
  • Migrating from Apache to Nginx on FreeBSD

    In this article I will tell you how I’ve migrated my servers running Apache+PHP to Nginx+PHP-fpm without diying the process.

  • Signify

    We look at OpenBSD’s Signify. You can use Signify as an alternative to GnuPG or Minisign for signing and verifying files.

    Signify uses Ed25519 for cryptographic signing and verification. OpenBSD developers use Signify extensively for signing. Actually, Ted Unangst developed the tool to sign and verify OpenBSD’s files. Besides, some other projects rely on Signify, like Wireguard, radare2, or LibreSSL.

    The current version of Signify is v30, released on September 24, 2020.

  • Introducing dhcpleased(8)

    Now enabled by default on OpenBSD -current is dhcpleased(8), a dynamic host configuration protocol daemon written by florian@ (Florian Obser), who spoke with us about his work: [...]

My Fanless OpenBSD Desktop

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BSD

After the disappointment of my X1 Nano and learning that all future Intel “Evo”-branded laptops would lack S3 suspend, I started thinking about returning to my M1 MacBook full-time or building an OpenBSD desktop. I chose the latter, building my first desktop machine in many years.

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NVMM Ported To DragonFlyBSD For Virtualization

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BSD

DragonFlyBSD has integrated the NetBSD Virtual Machine Monitor (NVMM) hypervisor that can be used with QEMU.

As of yesterday the initial NVMM port has landed within the DragonFlyBSD source tree for supporting NVMM for virtualization on this operating system long ago forked from FreeBSD. NVMM currently supports making use of AMD SVM and Intel VT/VMX for hardware accelerated virtualization.

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More in Tux Machines

Debian: EasyOS, Rust, TeX Live 2021

  • nodejs compiled in OpenEmbedded

    I posted a couple of days ago about another attempt to compile Chromium. Learnt a lot from that. One thing, is that need the 'nodejs' package in the host OS.

  • Ian Jackson: Tricky compatibility issue - Rust's io::ErrorKind

    This post is about some changes recently made to Rust's ErrorKind, which aims to categorise OS errors in a portable way. [...] The Rust programming language tries to make it straightforward to write portable code. Portable error handling is always a bit tricky. One of Rust's facilities in this area is std::io::ErrorKind which is an enum which tries to categorise (and, sometimes, enumerate) OS errors. The idea is that a program can check the error kind, and handle the error accordingly. That these ErrorKinds are part of the Rust standard library means that to get this right, you don't need to delve down and get the actual underlying operating system error number, and write separate code for each platform you want to support. You can check whether the error is ErrorKind::NotFound (or whatever). Because ErrorKind is so important in many Rust APIs, some code which isn't really doing an OS call can still have to provide an ErrorKind. For this purpose, Rust provides a special category ErrorKind::Other, which doesn't correspond to any particular OS error.

  • Norbert Preining: TeX Live 2021 for Debian

    The release of TeX Live 2021 is already half a year away, but due to the delay of waiting for Debian/Bullseye release, we haven’t updated TeX Live in Debian for quite some time. But the waiting is over, today I uploaded the first packages of TeX Live 2021 to unstable.

today's howtos

  • How to Install Glances System Monitor on Linux Mint 20 - LinuxCapable

    Glances System Monitor is free, an open-source command-line tool for process monitoring, system resources such as CPU, Disk I/O, File System, Load Average, Memory, Network Interfaces and processes. Glances are built with Python language. Glances support cross-platform monitoring, which can be used in conjunction with a web-based interface. One of the excellent features Glances supports is the ability to set thresholds in the program. You can set careful, warning, and critical in the configuration file, which will then relay information in colors that can show alerts to systems resources bottlenecks, system resources issues, and much more. Glances, by default, comes with a pre-set list of colors, but you can modify and add additional configs.

  • How To Install OpenLDAP on Ubuntu 20.04 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install OpenLDAP on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, OpenLDAP (lightweight directory access protocol) provides user authentication and enables you to set up user accounts that provide the user access to each computer in your network without having to set up a local user account on each computer. OpenLDAP is the free and open-source implementation of LDAP. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the OpenLDAP on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian-based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • Add storage with LVM | Opensource.com

    Logical Volume Manager (LVM) allows for a layer of abstraction between the operating system and the hardware. Normally, your OS looks for disks (/dev/sda, /dev/sdb, and so on) and partitions within those disks (/dev/sda1, /dev/sdb1, and so on). In LVM, a virtual layer is created between the operating system and the disks. Instead of one drive holding some number of partitions, LVM creates a unified storage pool (called a Volume Group) that spans any number of physical drives (called Physical Volumes). Using the storage available in a Volume Group, LVM provides what appear to be disks and partitions to your OS. And the operating system is completely unaware that it's being "tricked."

  • Turn Your Old PC into an Access Point [Ed: Old article reposted]

    Got some older computer equipment lying around? Don’t throw away those old PCs just yet. Whether you’re cleaning out or upgrading the computers in the office or at home, you should be able to find something to do with them. As we’ll discuss, you can use them for experimentation, routing, security, file or Internet serving, and more. Use these five suggestions to make one of the projects your late-night endeavor on the weekend or your new project at work.

  • How to back up Linux apps and files on your Chromebook - TechRepublic

    If you've made the jump and installed Linux support on your Chromebook, you've probably already started installing apps and working with files and data. That being the case, you might be curious as to how you back up those apps and data. In some cases, you'll be saving data within the Linux filesystem hierarchy (and not on either your local or cloud storage, via Chrome OS. Fortunately, the Chrome OS developers thought of this, so you don't have to bother with locating that data and running commands to back it all up.

Windows 11 will be the new Vista (or Windows 8)

I've been using Windows 10 in production for about two years now - testing it since even before the official release. Early on, my impression was that it was comparable to Windows 7. Okay. Nothing too special, new or revolutionary. Over time, this impression has changed. With subsequent semi-annual releases, I encountered issues I've never had in Windows before, mostly various system errors and bugs that speak of low quality and bad design. Then, Windows 10 would occasionally undo some of my tweaks and options, wasting my time, and forcing me to tighten the screws ever more. All in all, my outlook isn't bright or happy. Bored and exhausted by the nonsense would be the best word. Now, Windows 11 is coming. As I've done many times in the past, I logged into my Insiders account and started testing, to see what awaits me. Right away, I found the experience quite dejecting. My early impression of Windows 11 Dev Build was mediocre at best, and it progressively got worse with each update. Different from Windows 10, though. What happened was, I found myself reliving 2011, when I tested Windows 8 and came to pretty much the same conclusions. To wit, this is what I think will unfold. Read more

Maui Report – 15

Maui 2 was released a month ago, and since then new features, bug fixes, and improvements have been made to the Maui set of apps and frameworks; the following blog post will cover some of the changes and highlights from the last or so months of development. What’s new? Among many bug fixes that will be listed below for each individual app, some of the highlights include better support for client-side decorations aka CSD. Clip, the video player, is now working again on Android; MauiKit Controls now provide improved contextual menu actions and a lighter tab bar styling. Index, the file manager, can now also preview PDF documents, adding up to support for previews of text, video, audio and fonts file types; and translucency support is now embedded into MauiKit itself. Read more