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The first release candidate of NomadBSD 1.4 is now available!

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BSD

We are pleased to present the first release candidate of NomadBSD 1.4.

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GhostBSD 21.01.20 release note

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BSD

This new release is to fix a bug found in the installer related to the hostname not behind set up properly on the new system installation. I am sorry if some of you had a problem cause I the missing hostname.

[...]

Recommended system requirements for the new iso

- 64-bit processor
- 4GB+ of RAM
- 15 GB of free hard drive space
- Network card

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Linux vs. BSD: Everything You Need to Know

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Linux
BSD

BSDs are free and open-source systems that are very popular among old-school admins. They are direct descendants of the traditional Unix system and offer many rock-solid features. However, despite their robust performance, BSD systems do not enjoy the widespread popularity of Linux. So many users wonder if switching from Linux to BSD is a good idea. This guide aims to shed some light on this.

BSDs are a group of POSIX-compliant operating systems derived from the original Unix. They follow proven development strategies and focus on stability and performance. When talking about BSDs, we generally refer to one of the three main BSD distributions: FreeBSD, NetBSD, and OpenBSD.

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Netgate Announces pfSense Plus With Greater Divergence From pfSense

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Security
BSD

Netgate has announced pfSense as a rebranded and improved edition of this popular BSD-based firewall/network OS platform.

The pfSense Plus offering is based on the existing pfSense Factory Edition and with that a greater divergence is forming between pfSense Community Edition and this commercial offering,

Moving ahead, pfSense Community Edition and pfSense Plus will diverge but with Netgate continuing to "donate features" to the community project. pfSense Plus will be made available to Netgate customers and will be installed on all Netgate appliances.

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Original: Announcing pfSense® Plus

Audiocasts/Shows: CLI, BSD Now, Coder Radio and TLLTS

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GNU
Linux
BSD

BSD: WireGuard in pfSense and PulseAudio in FreeBSD

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BSD

  • WireGuard Is Now Available For pfSense - Phoronix

    The domination of the open-source WireGuard secure VPN tunnel not only on Linux systems but BSDs too... WireGuard is now available on pfSense, the FreeBSD-based firewall/router focused software platform. 

    Netgate announced today that WireGuard is now available for pfSense. Following FreeBSD mainlining WireGuard support at the end of November, initial support for WireGuard has been brought to pfSense Community Edition 2.5 snapshots. 

  •   

  • PulseAudio Lands Much Better Support For FreeBSD - Audio Now Plays Correctly - Phoronix

    While 2021 may be the year that some desktop Linux distributions begin using PipeWire by default as the next-generation replacement to the likes of PulseAudio and JACK, for upstream PulseAudio this week it's finally seeing better/restored support for FreeBSD. PulseAudio has merged a set of patches long available via FreeBSD Ports and the like to improve the BSD audio experience. 

GhostBSD 21.01.15 Release Notes

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BSD

I am happy to announce the availability of the new ISO 21.01.15. This new ISO comes with a clean-up of packages that include removing LibreOffice and Telegram from the default selection. We did this to bring the zfs RW live file systems to run without problem on 4GB of ram machine. We also removed the UFS full disk option from the installer. Users can still use custom partitions to setup UFS partition, but we discourage it. We also fixed the Next button's restriction in the custom partition related to some bug that people reported. We also fix the missing default locale setup and added the default setup for Linux Steam, not to forget this ISO includes kernel, userland and numerous application updates.

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FreeBSD October-December 2020 Status Report

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BSD

This report covers FreeBSD related projects for the period between October and December, and is the fourth of four planned reports for 2020.

This quarter had quite a lot of work done, including but certainly not limited to, in areas relating to everything from multiple architectures such as x86, aarch64, riscv, and ppc64 for both base and ports, over kernel changes such as vectored aio, routing lookups and multipathing, an alternative random(4) implementation, zstd integration for kernel dumps, log compression, zfs and preparations for pkg(8), along with wifi changes, changes to the toolchain like the new elfctl utility, and all the way to big changes like the git migration and moving the documentation from DocBook to Hugo/AsciiDoctor, as well as many other things too numerous to mention in an introduction.

This report with 42 entries, which don't hold the answer to life, the universe and everything, couldn't have happened without all the people doing the work also writing an entry for the report, so the quarterly team would like to thank them, as otherwise, we wouldn't have anything to do.

Please note that the deadline for submissions covering the period between January and March is March 31st.

We hope you'll enjoy reading as much as we enjoyed compiling it.
Daniel Ebdrup Jensen, on behalf of the quarterly team.

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Screencasts and Shows: Garuda KDE, RISC V and BSD Now

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GNU
Linux
BSD

From Unix to Linux: Key Trends in the Evolution of Operating Systems (Part 3)

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GNU
Linux
BSD

The developers and intense users of the BSD distributions I’ve talked to paint a complex portrait of BSD's dilemma, with as many angles as a cubist still life. Warner Losh, a former member of the FreeBSD core team, said in his comments on this article that he believes BSD had a healthy environment under its original developers, the Computer Systems Research Group (CSRG). That team finished its work and disbanded in 1995 with the intention that further development would take place in the BSDi company. Fragmentation started after that.

The leadership started making decisions that other contributors found arbitrary. Forming cliques, team members could not always recognize which contributions from outsiders were worth including. 386BSD, FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD—one by one, a small team of discontented developers would split off and create their own fork. The Linux community was immature by comparison, but kernel development stayed relatively united and the participants found their way forward to stability.

One might accept the proliferation of different BSD variants as a gift to users. Each variant had its own strengths—so the argument goes—and users could choose what was right for them. But the forks left none of the variants, except possibly FreeBSD, with a large enough critical mass to thrive. Anyone who wanted to develop for BSD needed to choose one of the variants or do a lot of porting. From the standpoint of the publishing industry, I can attest that putting out a book about BSD was nearly impossible. We couldn't cover all variants, and covering a single variant left us with too small an audience to make a profit.

McKusick points out that three separate distributions are a fairly small number for a historic operating system and seem like nothing compared to the fecund proliferation of GNU/Linux distributions. Not only do the utilities in the GNU/Linux distributions differ in important ways—such as the tools used to build and install software packages—but their underlying kernels are different.

This is all valid and worthy of discussion. But it's natural for distributions to build different kernels frequently. The Linux development repository has managed to remain unitary. And GNU/Linux enthusiasts will back me up in saying that one can reasonably learn enough utilities to expertly manage all the well-known distributions. Mick Bauer, who wrote Building Secure Servers with Linux for O'Reilly in 2002 (Linux Server Security in a later edition), confirms my point in his review of this article. He writes, "I was surprised at how easy it was to cover Red Hat, Debian/Ubuntu, and SuSE for all my topics. Knowing just a few utilities (mainly package managers) and config-file locations was all it took."

Bauer also attributes the burgeoning of GNU/Linux to two distinguishing traits: the strength of its distributions and the license under which it was developed. Regarding distributions, he says: "From very early on users could choose between militantly free distributions like Slackware and Debian, commercial distributions with structured training and support programs like Red Hat and SuSE, and all points between. But this diversity hasn't (yet) led to any disruptive schisms in Linux kernel development. Early in Linux's evolution, this combination of commercial support contracts and kernel-development stability helped make Linux a viable choice for hosting network services for large corporations."

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Also: Preliminary OpenBSD Support Added to OBS Studio

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Contributing to KDE is easier than you think – Bug triaging

Today, 2021-01-28, is the Plasma Beta Review Day for Plasma 5.21, that is to say, Plasma 5.20.90. Right now it’s a bit after 2 a.m., so after this I’m going to bed so I can be present later. This month I’ve mostly been enjoying my post-job vacation as last year I was bordering burnout. As such I didn’t help much. Before bed I’ll be providing a few things I’ve learned about triaging, though. While this blog post isn’t specifically about the Beta Review Day, this should make the general bug triaging process clearer for you, making it quite timely. Read more