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FreeBSD 13.0 – Full Desktop Experience

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

With the release of FreeBSD 13.0 on the horizon, I wanted to see how it shapes up on my Lenovo T450 laptop. Previous major releases on this laptop, using it as a workstation, felt very rough around the edges but with 13, it feels like the developers got it right.

I like to keep things simple when it comes to a desktop operating system so the description below is how I went from a fresh install of FreeBSD 13.0RC1 to a working environment that is based on using the XFCE4 desktop experience.

The FreeBSD install process is simple and well documented in other official locations, so I am not going to repeat that here. However, some of the configuration items that I did select was to use ZFS on Root, encrypted swap and disabled all services (this is a workstation, not a server).

Once the machine had been rebooted, we need to set it up so that suspend/resume works correctly (and tests as such) and enable power management. The main issue that people have getting the resume part of the suspend/resume to work is not having the drm or xf86 drivers loaded that are applicable to the onboard graphics.

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Linux, NetBSD, and OpenBSD

Filed under
Linux
BSD

  • EXT4 With Linux 5.13 Looks Like It Will Support Casefolding With Encryption Enabled - Phoronix

    While EXT4 supports both case-folding for optional case insensitive filenames and does support file-system encryption, at the moment those features are mutually exclusive. But it looks like the upcoming Linux 5.13 kernel will allow casefolding and encryption to be active at the same time.

    Queued this week into the EXT4 file-system's "dev" tree was ext4: handle casefolding with encryption.

  • SiFive FU740 PCIe Support Queued Ahead Of Linux 5.13 - Phoronix

    Arguably the most interesting RISC-V board announced to date is SiFive's HiFive Unmatched with the FU740 RISC-V SoC that features four U74-MC cores and one S7 embedded core. The HiFive Unmatched also has 16GB of RAM, USB 3.2 Gen 1, one PCI Express x16 slot (operating at x8 speeds), an NVMe slot, and Gigabit Ethernet. The upstream kernel support for the HiFive Unmatched and the FU740 SoC continues.

    With the Linux 5.12 cycle there was the start of mainlining SiFive FU740 SoC support and that work is continuing for the upcoming Linux 5.13 cycle.

  •                  

  • The state of toolchains in NetBSD

                     

                       

    While FreeBSD and OpenBSD both switched to using LLVM/Clang as their base system compiler, NetBSD picked a different path and remained with GCC and binutils regardless of the license change to GPLv3. However, it doesn't mean that the NetBSD project endorses this license, and the NetBSD Foundation's has issued a statement about its position on the subject.

                       

    Realistically, NetBSD is more or less tied to GCC, as it supports more architectures than the other BSDs, some of which will likely never be supported in LLVM.

                       

    As of NetBSD 9.1, the latest released version, all supported platforms have recent versions of GCC (7.5.0) and binutils (2.31.1) in the base system. Newer (and older!) versions of GCC can be installed via Pkgsrc, and the following packages are available, going all the way back to GCC 3.3.6: [...]

  •                

  • Review: OpenBSD 6.8 on 8th Gen Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 13.3"

                     

                       

    10 days ago, I bought this X1 Carbon. I immediately installed OpenBSD on it. It took me a few days to settle in and make myself at home, but here are my impressions.

                       

    This was the smoothest experience I've had getting OpenBSD set up the way I like it. The Toshiba NB305 in 2011 was a close second, but the Acer I used between these two laptops required a lot more tweaking of both hardware and kernel to get it to feel like home.

BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD
  • How to set Proxy and Update FreeBSD

    FreeBSD is an operating system used to power modern servers, desktops, and embedded platforms A large community has continually developed it for more than thirty years. Its advanced networking, security, and storage features have made FreeBSD the platform of choice for many of the busiest web sites and most pervasive embedded networking and storage devices.

  • How to install software in FreeBSD (mc example install)

    FreeBSD is an operating system used to power modern servers, desktops, and embedded platforms A large community has continually developed it for more than thirty years. Its advanced networking, security, and storage features have made FreeBSD the platform of choice for many of the busiest web sites and most pervasive embedded networking and storage devices.

  • Link-o-Rama: Google testing new targeted ads, FreeBSD’s big oops, Henry Rollins’ record habits & Robyn Hitchcock’s essential records

    More than 20 years ago, when Linux was still wet around the ears, I remember a NetBSD proponent talking my ear off about how Linux was doomed (doomed!) and that the *BSDs would “win” in the long run because their code was more elegant and so forth. I’m still waiting… (To be fair, not all of my predictions and hot takes from the late 90s / early 00s were all that accurate, either.)

FreeBSD 13.0-RC5 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

The fifth RC build of the 13.0-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 13.0-RC5 amd64 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC5 i386 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC5 powerpc GENERIC
o 13.0-RC5 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 13.0-RC5 powerpc64le GENERIC64LE
o 13.0-RC5 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 13.0-RC5 armv6 RPI-B
o 13.0-RC5 armv7 GENERICSD
o 13.0-RC5 aarch64 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC5 aarch64 RPI
o 13.0-RC5 aarch64 PINE64
o 13.0-RC5 aarch64 PINE64-LTS
o 13.0-RC5 aarch64 PINEBOOK
o 13.0-RC5 aarch64 ROCK64
o 13.0-RC5 aarch64 ROCKPRO64
o 13.0-RC5 riscv64 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC5 riscv64 GENERICSD

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/13.0/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use Git to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/13.0" branch.

A summary of changes since 13.0-RC4 includes:

o COMPAT_FREEBSD32 fill/set dbregs/fpregs has been implemented for
  aarch64.

o Miscellaneous DTrace updates.

o An issue that could potentially affect some services to properly
  restart, notably Nginx, has been addressed.

o Miscellaneous networking fixes.

A list of changes since 12.2-RELEASE is available in the releng/13.0
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/releases/13.0R/relnotes.html

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 13.0-RELEASE cycle progresses.

=== Virtual Machine Disk Images ===

VM disk images are available for the amd64, i386, and aarch64
architectures.  Disk images may be downloaded from the following URL
(or any of the FreeBSD download mirrors):

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/VM-IMAGES/13.0-RC5/

The partition layout is:

    ~ 16 kB - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    ~ 1 GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    ~ 20 GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image
formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB and 165 MB
respectively (amd64/i386), decompressing to a 21 GB sparse image.

Note regarding arm64/aarch64 virtual machine images: a modified QEMU EFI
loader file is needed for qemu-system-aarch64 to be able to boot the
virtual machine images.  See this page for more information:

    https://wiki.freebsd.org/arm64/QEMU

To boot the VM image, run:

    % qemu-system-aarch64 -m 4096M -cpu cortex-a57 -M virt  \
	-bios QEMU_EFI.fd -serial telnet::4444,server -nographic \
	-drive if=none,file=VMDISK,id=hd0 \
	-device virtio-blk-device,drive=hd0 \
	-device virtio-net-device,netdev=net0 \
	-netdev user,id=net0

Be sure to replace "VMDISK" with the path to the virtual machine image.

BASIC-CI images can be found at:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/CI-IMAGES/13.0-RC5/

Read more

Also: FreeBSD 13.0-RC5 Released Due To Lingering Bugs

Audiocasts/Shows: Ubuntu Podcast, BSDNow, Bad Voltage, and Noodlings

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD

FreeBSD 13.0-RC4 Now Available

Filed under
BSD
The fourth RC build of the 13.0-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 13.0-RC4 amd64 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC4 i386 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC4 powerpc GENERIC
o 13.0-RC4 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 13.0-RC4 powerpc64le GENERIC64LE
o 13.0-RC4 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 13.0-RC4 armv6 RPI-B
o 13.0-RC4 armv7 GENERICSD
o 13.0-RC4 aarch64 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC4 aarch64 RPI
o 13.0-RC4 aarch64 PINE64
o 13.0-RC4 aarch64 PINE64-LTS
o 13.0-RC4 aarch64 PINEBOOK
o 13.0-RC4 aarch64 ROCK64
o 13.0-RC4 aarch64 ROCKPRO64
o 13.0-RC4 riscv64 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC4 riscv64 GENERICSD

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/13.0/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use Git to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/13.0" branch.

A summary of changes since 13.0-RC3 includes:

o A fix affecting scripted installations has been addressed.

o Several POWERPC fixes have been included.

o A memory leak in NETMAP_REQ_PORT_INFO_GET has been fixed.

o An issue with local-unbound and some IPv6 deployment has been fixed.

o Historical output range from random(9) has been restored to previous
  behavior.

o OpenSSL has been updated to version 1.1.1k.

o A fix for validation of RDNSS options has been addressed.

o Other miscellaneous items have been addressed.

A list of changes since 12.2-RELEASE is available in the releng/13.0
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/releases/13.0R/relnotes.html

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 13.0-RELEASE cycle progresses.

=== Virtual Machine Disk Images ===

VM disk images are available for the amd64, i386, and aarch64
architectures.  Disk images may be downloaded from the following URL
(or any of the FreeBSD download mirrors):

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/VM-IMAGES/13.0-RC4/

The partition layout is:

    ~ 16 kB - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    ~ 1 GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    ~ 20 GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image
formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB and 165 MB
respectively (amd64/i386), decompressing to a 21 GB sparse image.

Note regarding arm64/aarch64 virtual machine images: a modified QEMU EFI
loader file is needed for qemu-system-aarch64 to be able to boot the
virtual machine images.  See this page for more information:

    https://wiki.freebsd.org/arm64/QEMU

To boot the VM image, run:

    % qemu-system-aarch64 -m 4096M -cpu cortex-a57 -M virt  \
	-bios QEMU_EFI.fd -serial telnet::4444,server -nographic \
	-drive if=none,file=VMDISK,id=hd0 \
	-device virtio-blk-device,drive=hd0 \
	-device virtio-net-device,netdev=net0 \
	-netdev user,id=net0

Be sure to replace "VMDISK" with the path to the virtual machine image.

Read more

Also: FreeBSD 13.0-RC4 Released With POWER Fixes, Other Bugs Addressed

Interview with Abhinav Upadhyay, NetBSD contributor and machine learning software developer

Filed under
Interviews
BSD

Abhinav Upadhyay is an Indian software developer, the NetBSD project contributor, and works with the exciting field of machine learning (ML). Recently I did a quick Q and A with Abhinav about his life-changing journey with NetBSD, getting started with ML and FLOSS community, and his daily workflow.

Read more

Buffer overruns, license violations, and bad code: FreeBSD 13’s close call

Filed under
BSD

At first glance, Matthew Macy seemed like a perfectly reasonable choice to port WireGuard into the FreeBSD kernel. WireGuard is an encrypted point-to-point tunneling protocol, part of what most people think of as a "VPN." FreeBSD is a Unix-like operating system that powers everything from Cisco and Juniper routers to Netflix's network stack, and Macy had plenty of experience on its dev team, including work on multiple network drivers.
So when Jim Thompson, the CEO of Netgate, which makes FreeBSD-powered routers, decided it was time for FreeBSD to enjoy the same level of in-kernel WireGuard support that Linux does, he reached out to offer Macy a contract. Macy would port WireGuard into the FreeBSD kernel, where Netgate could then use it in the company's popular pfSense router distribution. The contract was offered without deadlines or milestones; Macy was simply to get the job done on his own schedule.

With Macy's level of experience—with kernel coding and network stacks in particular—the project looked like a slam dunk. But things went awry almost immediately. WireGuard founding developer Jason Donenfeld didn't hear about the project until it surfaced on a FreeBSD mailing list, and Macy didn't seem interested in Donenfeld's assistance when offered. After roughly nine months of part-time development, Macy committed his port—largely unreviewed and inadequately tested—directly into the HEAD section of FreeBSD's code repository, where it was scheduled for incorporation into FreeBSD 13.0-RELEASE.

This unexpected commit raised the stakes for Donenfeld, whose project would ultimately be judged on the quality of any production release under the WireGuard name. Donenfeld identified numerous problems with Macy's code, but rather than object to the port's release, Donenfeld decided to fix the issues. He collaborated with FreeBSD developer Kyle Evans and with Matt Dunwoodie, an OpenBSD developer who had worked on WireGuard for that operating system. The three replaced almost all of Macy's code in a mad week-long sprint.

Read more

FreeBSD 13.0-RC3 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

The third RC build of the 13.0-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 13.0-RC3 amd64 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC3 i386 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC3 powerpc GENERIC
o 13.0-RC3 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 13.0-RC3 powerpc64le GENERIC64LE
o 13.0-RC3 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 13.0-RC3 armv6 RPI-B
o 13.0-RC3 armv7 GENERICSD
o 13.0-RC3 aarch64 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC3 aarch64 RPI
o 13.0-RC3 aarch64 PINE64
o 13.0-RC3 aarch64 PINE64-LTS
o 13.0-RC3 aarch64 PINEBOOK
o 13.0-RC3 aarch64 ROCK64
o 13.0-RC3 aarch64 ROCKPRO64
o 13.0-RC3 riscv64 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC3 riscv64 GENERICSD

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/13.0/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use Git to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/13.0" branch.

Read more

BSD and Free Software Leftovers

Filed under
GNU
BSD
  • Release candidate: Godot 3.3 RC 6

    If you missed the recent news, we decided to change our versioning for Godot 3.x and rename the upcoming version 3.2.4 to Godot 3.3, thereby starting a new stable branch. Check the dedicated blog post for details.

    But aside from the name change, it's still the same release. Our last testing build was 3.2.4 RC 5 and so this new Release Candidate is named 3.3 RC 6. The version change doesn't mean that we're reopening the branch for new features, and so Godot 3.3 is very close to its stable release.

    We still need a good round of testing on this new build to ensure that everything works as we want it before we make this the new stable branch (which will supersede the current 3.2.3 stable version).

  • The Apache News Round-up: week ending 19 March 2021

    And it's Friday! Let's take a look at what the Apache community has been up to over the past week...

  • The top tools data scientists use

    The sheer amount of data we need to process keeps growing, and you need the best tools to keep up. Here they are.
    I go on half-hour walks. After a walk, thanks to data collection tools in my smartwatch and smartphone, I can see that I took 4,227 steps, just over two miles, in 35 minutes and 14 seconds, and that I burned 191 calories along the way. And Google, Samsung, and my doctor, thanks to a connection to her electronic health record software, knows it too. Like it or lump it, we live in the world of big data.

    According to Statista, a business portal data site, in 2020 alone we reached a new high of 59 zettabytes of data. How much is a zettabyte, you ask? It's 10 to the 21st power bytes, or a trillion gigabytes. Or, in other words, the Library of Congress's total data is the merest minute fraction of the data constantly pouring into the Internet.

  • SaaSy move: GitLab floats a new company over the Great Firewall of China • The Register

    GitLab has licensed its technology to a Chinese company as the DevOps darling looks to drive adoption of its platform in the most populated country in the world.

    The company's existing self-managed version has been available in China for a while through a variety of resellers and system integrators and the online repo lays claim to several million users. The full-on SaaS version has, however, not been accessible in the same way due to what GitLab delicately referred to as "local licensing requirements."

    To deal with those issues, GitLab Information Technology (Hubei) Co., Ltd (referred to as JiHu) has been set up as an entity independent of GitLab Inc.

  • EuroBSDCon 2021 Call for Papers open

    Hoping to be able to make a conference in Vienna in September (and doing it digitally if not), the EuroBSDCon is now accepting submissions for presentations and tutorials.

  • Introduction to wg(4) - OpenBSD

    Before going further let's have a look at when OpenBSD's Wireguard implementation hit base by default.

    On May 12 2020, Matt Dunwoodie shared his work on OpenBSD's Wireguard implementation on openbsd-tech mailing list: [...]

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today's leftovers

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 678

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 678 for the week of April 4 – 10, 2021.

  • Ubuntu Blog: Design and Web team summary – 12 April 2021

    The web team at Canonical run two-week iterations building and maintaining all of Canonical websites and product web interfaces. Here are some of the highlights of our completed work from this iteration. This iteration has seen many of the team out of the office as schools are out in the UK. This has not limited the exciting new features and developments from the team.

  • Enabling Rapid Decision Making with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server and NVIDIA Virtual GPU (vGPU)
  • SUSECON Digital 2021: a Behind-the-Scenes Look at a Space Oddity | SUSE Communities

    It’s been almost a year since we unveiled SUSECON Digital 2020 – our first virtual SUSECON event. No lies, that event was pulled off in a frenzied whirlwind of pandemic onslaughts, virtual session recordings, and bandwidth battles. Frankly, I was amazed that we met our production schedule in the wake of the Covid-cancellation of our live event in Dublin. And I was even more amazed at our SUSECON audience reaction to the virtual event. You loved it! As one of the first virtual conferences of the Covid era, your feedback told us that we had delivered exactly what was needed at the time. What an exceptional opportunity for us to include thousands of friends from all over the world who normally can’t join us at the big event!

  • JK Tyre & Industries improves operating efficiency and drives future innovation with SUSE
  • Top 3 Linux Server Operating Systems in 2021

    In this article we will look at several Linux distributions, which are an excellent choice if we want to use them as servers. We chose them precisely because they have an excellent level of security, regular patch maintenance and updates, and huge communities. In addition, there are thousands of tutorials on the Internet for every single thing on how to do it and last but not least they are easy to use. [...] Although we have not put them in the top three, not because they are not unique server operating systems, but because they require more patience, knowledge and time, we must mention FreeBSD, Red Hat, Cent OS and Fedora.

  • Element Keeps conversations in your control

    You are probably using chat applications like Slack, WhatsApp, Discord, Facebook Messenger, Telegram, and another chat app. These are all great to have but in using them you are making a trade-off; you are trading security and privacy for a service that easy to use. Matrix is an open standard for communication messages. It is not a server so much as a standard way for clients and servers to talk with each other. The clients and server are open sources. With Matrix, you are not giving your data away to a company that is going to profile you and target advertising at you. This provides a degree of transparency you can look at the code, and you can be confident that it is behaving itself. Many developer love Matrix because it let them build on it like Lego bricks and write their clients and servers bots or anything else you can self-host your Matrix server and that means you can create a private community where it knows that your communications are not being intercepted by anybody else. Matrix also has the option for end-to-end encryption, so you know that your messages are private. Let’s take a look at a Matrix client known as Element (Riot and Vector) and it is pretty much the reference messaging client.

  • RSS Guard 3.9.2

    RSS Guard is a simple (yet powerful) feed reader. It is able to fetch the most known feed formats, including RSS/RDF and ATOM. It's free, it's open-source. RSS Guard currently supports Czech, Dutch, English, French, German, Italian. RSS Guard will never depend on other services - this includes online news aggregators like Feedly, The Old Reader and others.

  • Free Software: Is It Just A Thing Of The Past?

    Free software is an idea that has existed since before the foundation of Linux but has the idea become stuck in the past and is FOSS something that we should move past, this author seems to think so, I disagree though.

  • New Linux Foundation project takes blockchain and the open source approach to the insurance industry
  •    
  • Linux Foundation Hosts Collaboration Among World’s Largest Insurance Companies

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, and the American Association of Insurance Services (AAIS), today are announcing the launch of OpenIDL, the Open Insurance Data Link platform and project. The platform will reduce the cost of regulatory reporting for insurance carriers, provide a standardized data repository for analytics and a connection point for third parties to deliver new applications to members. openIDL brings together some of the world’s largest insurance companies, including The Hanover and Selective Insurance Group, along with technology and service providers Chainyard, KatRisk and MOBI to advance a common distributed ledger platform for sharing information and business processes across the insurance ecosystem. [...] “AAIS, and the insurance industry in general, are trailblazers in their contribution and collaboration to these technologies,” said Mike Dolan, senior vice president and general manager of Projects at the Linux Foundation. “Open governance networks like openIDL can now accelerate innovation and development of new product and service offerings for insurance providers and their customers. We’re excited to host this work.” As an open source project, all software source code developed will be licensed under an OSI-approved open source license, and all interface specifications developed will be published under an open specification license. And all technical discussions between participants will take place publicly, further enhancing the ability to expand the network to include other participants. As with an openly accessible network, organizations can develop their own proprietary applications and infrastructure integrations.

  • Windows, Ubuntu, Zoom, Safari, MS Exchange Hacked at Pwn2Own 2021

    The 2021 spring edition of Pwn2Own hacking contest concluded last week on April 8 with a three-way tie between Team Devcore, OV, and Computest researchers Daan Keuper and Thijs Alkemade. [...] The Zoom vulnerabilities exploited by Daan Keuper and Thijs Alkemade of Computest Security are particularly noteworthy because the flaws require no interaction of the victim other than being a participant on a Zoom call. What's more, it affects both Windows and Mac versions of the app, although it's not clear if Android and iOS versions are vulnerable as well. Technical details of the flaws are yet to be disclosed, but in a statement sharing the findings, the Dutch security firm said the researchers "were then able to almost completely take over the system and perform actions such as turning on the camera, turning on the microphone, reading emails, checking the screen and downloading the browser history."

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (kernel and libldb), Debian (mediawiki, qemu, ruby-kramdown, and xen), Fedora (grub2, libldb, libopenmpt, python-pikepdf, python39, samba, squid, and webkit2gtk3), openSUSE (bcc, ceph, gssproxy, hostapd, isync, kernel, openexr, openSUSE KMPs, and tpm2-tss-engine), SUSE (fwupdate and wpa_supplicant), and Ubuntu (spamassassin).

Programming Leftovers

  • Create Beautiful Websites Using Emacs Org Mode

    In my never-ending quest to find the perfect way to create beautiful (yet minimal) websites, I had to try out Org Export in Emacs. Since I tend to write everything in Org Mode these days, it would be amazing to simply be able to convert my Org docs into HTML, and maybe add a little CSS to spice things up.

  • Qt Creator 4.15: New CMake Features

    Qt Creator 4.15 comes with a bunch of features and bug fixes for the CMake Project Manager. Below, you have a list of what’s new and a few tips and tricks which would hopefully improve your CMake experience in Qt Creator.

  • 7 Popular Open Source CI/CD Tools

    DevOps is a software development strategy that incorporates agile practices for fast, efficient product creation and release. It focuses on integration of development and operations teams, continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD) and automation of tasks and processes. Typically, DevOps teams use pipelines to streamline and standardize processes. DevOps pipelines are toolchains that teams can use to automate tasks and provide visibility into the software development life cycle. In this article, we’ll cover seven popular open source CI/CD tools.

  • Community Member Monday: Gökçe Kuler

    I’m from Aydın, Turkey. Currently I’m studying in my final years at the Computer Engineering department of Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University. I’m interested in free software – and enjoy working with free software projects and learning new things aboutthemit. I met free software when I started university via my advisor Necdet Yücel. I like playing the guitar and the kalimba. Also, I recently started painting with acrylic paints. I’m vegetarian, and actively participate in animal protection and gender equality projects.

  • App Showcase: Drawing

    Drawing is a simple app in the PureOS store to doodle on a digital canvas.

today's howtos

  • How to Use tcpdump and 6 Examples

    Are you trying to capture data packets in order to analyze traffic on your network? Maybe you are a server administrator who has bumped into an issue and wants to monitor transmitted data on the network. Whatever the situation be, the tcpdump Linux utility is what you need. In this article, we will discuss the tcpdump command in detail, along with some guides on how to install and use tcpdump on your Linux system.

  • How to play The Forest on Linux

    The Forest works on Linux, but only with Proton’s help, which is a built-in feature of the Linux release of Steam. So, before we can go over how to configure the game, we must demonstrate how to install Steam on Linux.

  • How to Install CopyQ Clipboard Manager 4.0.0 in Ubuntu 20.04 | UbuntuHandbook

    The CopyQ clipboard manager released version 4.0.0 a day ago. Here’s how to install it in Ubuntu 20.04, Ubuntu 21.04, Ubuntu 18.04 via PPA. CopyQ is a free and open-source clipboard manager with editing and scripting features. The new 4.0.0 release features new script engine with some new functions, better ECMAScript support, improved performance.

  • These 10 Sed Examples Will Make You a Linux Power User

    Editing text files and terminal output is an everyday job for those who administer Linux machines. Command-line utilities like sed allow a user to modify and change the content of a text file right from the terminal window. In this article, we will discuss the sed command in detail, along with some essential examples that demonstrate the power of the sed utility in Linux.

Today in Techrights