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BSD: ZFS, NetBSD and BSD Router Project Release 1.97

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BSD
  • An Introduction to ZFS A Place to Start

    ZFS has become increasingly popular in recent years. ZFS on Linux (ZoL) has pushed the envelope and exposed many newcomers to the ZFS fold. iXsystems has adopted the newer codebase, now called OpenZFS, into its codebase for TrueNAS CORE. The purpose of this article is to help those of you who have heard about ZFS but have not yet had the opportunity to research it.

    Our hope is that we leave you with a better understanding of how and why it works the way it does. Knowledge is key to the decision-making process, and we feel that ZFS is something worth considering for most organizations.

  • GSoC Reports: Enhancing Syzkaller support for NetBSD, Part 2

    As a part of Google summer code 2020, I have been working on Enhance the Syzkaller support for NetBSD. This post summarises the work done in the past month.

    For work done in the first coding period, you can take a look at the previous post.

  • The GNU GDB Debugger and NetBSD (Part 3)

    I've written an integration of GDB with fork(2) and vfork(2) events. Unfortunately, this support (present in a local copy of GDB in the base-system) had not been merged so far, because there is a generic kernel regression with the pg_jobc variable. This variable can be called a reference counter of the number of processes within a process group that has a parent with control over a terminal. The semantics of this variable are not very well defined and in the result the number can become negative. This unexpected state of pg_jobc resulted in spurious crashes during kernel fuzzing. As a result new kernel assertions checking for non-negative pg_jobc values were introduced in order to catch the anomalies quickly. GDB as a ptrace(2)-based application happened to reproduce negative pg_jobc values quickly and reliably and this stopped the further adoption of the fork(2) and vfork(2) patch in GDB, until the pg_jobc behavior is enhanced. I was planning to include support for posix_spawn(3) events as well, as they are implemented as a first-class operation through a syscall, however this is also blocked by the pg_jobc blocker.

  • BSD Router Project Release 1.97 (04/08/2020)

DragonFlyBSD Pulls In AMD Temperature Driver, SMN Support From FreeBSD

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BSD

DragonFlyBSD has been generally working out well for AMD Zen systems sans a few motherboard specific woes, but now is getting even better thanks to importing some new drivers from FreeBSD.

Most exciting is the amdtemp driver now being imported from FreeBSD to DragonFlyBSD. This driver allows for temperature monitoring on AMD Family 0Fh, 10h, 11h, 12h, 14h, 15h, 16h, and 17h processors. The AMD Family 17h support covers Zen 1 as well as Zen 2, including the likes of Threadripper and EPYC.

Also imported from FreeBSD is the amdsmn driver. This driver is for the AMD System Management Network (SMN) support on AMD Zen systems.

Read more

FreeBSD Foundation Turns 20, Has New Site Look

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BSD
  • We’ve Got a New Look

    The Foundation team is excited to announce a new look for our website! We hope you’ll find the new site easier to read and navigate. We’ve also added a FreeBSD Resources section that includes links to our how-to guides and other community training resources. If you have a blog, youtube channel, or other training materials you’d like us to include, please let us know.

    Also, as you may have noticed, not only are we unveiling a new site, but we’re also unveiling a 20th Anniversary logo. It’s hard to believe the Foundation has been supporting the FreeBSD Project for 20 years. You’ll hear more about that in the coming weeks. In the meantime, take a look around the site and let us know if you see something amiss.

  • FreeBSD Foundation Celebrates 20th Anniversary

    The FreeBSD Foundation has announced its twentieth anniversary. Founded as a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization by early FreeBSD developer Justin Gibbs in March 2000, the FreeBSD Foundation has helped FreeBSD to become one of the most widely distributed open source operating systems, and is used by Netflix, Apple, Sony, Intel, Microsoft, and tens of millions of deployed systems.

    From 2000 to 2005, FreeBSD Foundation activities were managed by its board of directors comprised of volunteers, including Gibbs. During this time, FreeBSD partnered with Sun Microsystems to license FreeBSD Java binaries, funded early work on network scalability for SMP systems, and fostered BSD conferences. In 2004, the FreeBSD Foundation acquired the FreeBSD trademark from Wind River.

    In 2005, the FreeBSD Foundation hired its first employee, Deb Goodkin, who came to the foundation with a technical background of 20 years in storage development as firmware engineer, logic designer, applications engineer, technical marketing and technical sales.

OPNsense® 20.7 "Legendary Lion" released

Filed under
Security
BSD

For five and a half years, OPNsense is driving innovation through modularising and hardening the open source firewall, with simple and reliable firmware upgrades, multi-language support, HardenedBSD security, fast adoption of upstream software updates as well as clear and stable 2-Clause BSD licensing.

20.7, nicknamed "Legendary Lion", is a major operating system jump forward on a sustainable firewall experience. This release adds DHCPv6 multi-WAN, custom error pages for the web proxy, Suricata 5, HardenedBSD 12.1, netstat tree view, basic firewall API support (via plugin) and extended live log filtering amongst
others.

Download links, an installation guide[1] and the checksums for the images can be found below as well.

Read more

BSD Shows: "OPNsense Makes Sense" and BSD Now

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BSD

           

  • OPNsense Makes Sense | Self-Hosted 24

    Chris figures out how hot is too hot, Alex performs an extreme remote firewall install, and we share some of our favorite SSH tricks.

  •        

  • BSD Now 361: Function-based MicroVM

    Emulex: The Cheapest 10gbe for Your Homelab, In Search of 2.11BSD, as released, Fakecracker: NetBSD as a Function Based MicroVM, First powerpc64 snapshots available for OpenBSD, OPNsense 20.1.8 released, and more.

Checking Out FuryBSD 12.1, KDE Edition

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BSD

FuryBSD is a relatively young project that is offering live systems using either KDE Plasma or the Xfce environment for the x86_64 architecture based on FreeBSD that can be installed from the desktop once booted up. This sounds quite appealing after having had good experiences with GhostBSD which is also based on FreeBSD and I was looking forward to check out a clean system using KDE.

Years ago I had tried the now discontinued PC-BSD with KDE but it seemed heavy and bloated. The website also looks lean, nice and professional, promising a "powerful, portable FreeBSD desktop" so expectations were up. Time to get the ISO. The last release is 12.1 and as indicated I opted to download the Plasma edition over Xfce. The file is 3.2 GB in size. If that is a problem or takes too long on a slow connection the Xfce edition comes in at a more manageable 1.6 GB. The file was then written to USB key. I tried both the 2020030701 release and the updated 2020042001 with similar results.

Booting up the FuryBSD live image we get a traditional black screen with Ascii style characters straight from the old days of computing. Such is the BSD heritage. There are a couple of options to boot into multi user (the default) or single user mode which allows us to go into text mode and also an option to abort. This is pretty much it. Unfortunately there is no way to start an installation from here so we'll have to boot into the desktop. Once we hit that option the boot sequence commences, predictably old style and without obfuscation. Lots of text scrolling by but that's ok with me.

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: BSD Now, Bad Voltage, Python Bytes and The Linux Link Tech Show (TLLTS)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD

TrueNAS Core will soon replace FreeNAS—and we test the beta

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

Earlier this week, network-storage vendor iXsystems announced the release of TrueNAS 12.0-BETA1, which will replace FreeNAS later in 2020. The major offering of the new TrueNAS Core—like FreeNAS before it—is a simplified, graphically managed way to expose the features and benefits of the ZFS filesystem to end users. In the most basic environments, this might amount to little more than a Web front-end to ZFS itself, along with the Samba open-source implementation of Microsoft's SMB network file-sharing protocol.

Although this might be sufficient for the majority of users, it only scratches the surface of what TrueNAS Core is capable of. For instance, more advanced storage users may choose to share files via NFS or iSCSI in addition to or in place of SMB. Additional services can be installed via plug-ins utilizing FreeBSD's jail (containerization) facility, and the system can even run guest operating systems by way of FreeBSD's BHyve virtualization system—all managed via Web interface alone.

TrueNAS Core will be what FreeNAS is now—the free, community version of iXsystems' NAS (Network Attached Storage) distribution. End users—and system administrators who aren't looking for paid support—can download FreeNAS or TrueNAS Core ISOs directly from iX, burn them to a bootable optical disc or thumbdrive, and install them on generic x86 hardware like any other operating system.

We've been kicking the tires on early versions of TrueNAS Core since its announcement in March, and we see no evidence of any FreeNAS functionality slipping away behind "premium only" paywalls. The dividing lines between TrueNAS Core and TrueNAS Enterprise are no different than those between earlier versions of FreeNAS and TrueNAS itself.

Due to the sheer breadth of TrueNAS Core's offerings, we can't walk you through everything it's capable of in a single article. But we will hit the major highlights along the way—we'll install the distribution and set up a storage pool on eight physical disks, join TrueNAS Core to a Windows Active Directory domain, set up some file shares, and play with ZFS snapshot and replication facilities.

Read more

FreeBSD Back To Seeing Progress On 802.11ac WiFi Support, Ath10k Driver

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BSD

  • FreeBSD Back To Seeing Progress On 802.11ac WiFi Support, Ath10k Driver

    Longtime FreeBSD/Linux network stack developer and former Qualcomm Atheros engineer Adrian Chadd is back to working on FreeBSD wireless networking improvements.

    Adrian Chadd has announced his return to working on FreeBSD's wireless networking stack with a particular focus on the 802.11ac support (or there the largely lack of at the moment) and the porting of the Ath10k driver from Linux to FreeBSD.

  • [Old] Throw-Away Browser on FreeBSD With "pot" Within 5 Minutes

    pot is a great and relatively new jail management tool. It offers DevOps style provisioning and can even be used to provide Docker-like, scalable cloud services together with nomad and consul (more about this in Orchestrating jails with nomad and pot).

    When using FreeBSD on your desktop, you can also use it simply to easily create “throw away” browser jails. That way, the browser environment is reliably and completely erased and reset each time you re-create it with one single, simple command.

  • [Old] Questions and Answers (by Jesse Smith)

    Comparing-apples-to-BSDs asks: I was reading one of the old articles from the archive. One of the things mentioned was how the BSDs have a distinct approach in terms of packaging the base system relative to userland apps, and that the Linux distros at the time were not following the same practice. Are there Linux distros that have adopted the same approach in modern times? If not, are there technical limitations that are preventing them from doing so, such as some distros supporting multiple kernel versions maybe? [...]

Audiocasts/Shows: BSD Now, Going Linux, Self-Hosted and TLLTS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • BSD Now 359: Throwaway Browser

    Throw-Away Browser on FreeBSD With "pot" within 5 minutes, OmniOS as OpenBSD guest with bhyve, BSD vs Linux distro development, My FreeBSD Laptop Build, FreeBSD CURRENT Binary Upgrades, and more.

  • Going Linux #394 · Manjaro Linux Overview

    Bill searches for a non-Debian-based distribution that is suitable for Linux newcomers. He finds one in Manjaro!
    Episode 394 Time Stamps
    00:00 Going Linux #394 · Manjaro Linux Overview
    01:51 Rolling release
    04:02 An Arch-based distribution for new Linux users
    05:46 Windows vs. Manjaro on Dell Latitude 5450
    10:13 Performance comparison after installation
    13:09 The promise of perpetual upgrades
    13:59 Installing Manjaro
    14:44 The updates
    16:56 Compared with other distros best for new Linux users
    17:37 Default browser (Midori)
    19:12 Manjaro Hello (Welcome)
    21:30 Obtaining and installing software
    24:12 Universal package format support
    27:57 The community support
    29:49 Manjaro: New user distro
    32:25 A note on hybrid graphics
    35:20 Overall: 'Thumbs up'
    38:04 goinglinux.com, goinglinux@gmail.com, +1-904-468-7889, @goinglinux, feedback, listen, subscribe
    39:04 End

  • Shields Up | Self-Hosted 23

    We've spent thousands of dollars, and over a decade refining the perfect home media setup. We get nostalgic and share what worked, and what REALLY didn't.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 866

    terminal-quest, kano products, pi, stuff

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More in Tux Machines

AWOW AK41 Mini Desktop PC – Gaming – Week 5

This is a weekly blog chronicling my experiences of running the AWOW AK41 Mini Desktop PC on Linux. I’ve already touched on the graphics capabilities of the AWOW AK41. To recap, this Mini PC uses the Intel UHD Graphics 605, an integrated processor graphics unit from the Gemini Lake generation. Performance of the graphics unit is widely reported as in the low-end segment and rarely sufficient for modern games. It’s often touted that integrated graphics are not meant for gaming. But what does that really mean? There are tons of free games available for Linux. Many of them aren’t that graphically demanding. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Clarissa Borges: Which library is the GNOME UI extending from?

    About two weeks ago I did some research and learned about some libraries to choose one to extend from to use on my GSoC GNOME UI library project, and it turned out to be a very interesting topic that I’d like to share and take the opportunity to talk about how’s the project going, as it’s been a while since I don’t blog :P In case you don’t know what my project is about, I recommend you to visit my first post where I provide an explanation of the project goals.

  • KDE Plasma 5.20 Pre-Beta Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at KDE Plasma 5.20 Pre-Beta. Enjoy!

  • DebConf6 (20200804-debconf6)

    DebConf6 was my 4th DebConf and took place in Oaxtepec, Mexico. I'm a bit exhausted right now which is probably quite fitting to write something about DebConf6... many things in life are a question of perception, so I will mention the waterfall and the big swirl and the band playing with the fireworks during the conference dinner, the joy that we finally could use the local fiber network (after asking for months) just after discovering that the 6h shopping tour forgot to bring the essential pig tail connectors to connect the wireless antennas to the cards, which we needed to provide network to the rooms where the talks would take place. DebConf6 was the first DebConf with live streaming using dvswitch (written by Ben Hutchings and removed from unstable in 2015 as the world had moved to voctomix, which is yet another story to be told eventually). The first years (so DebConf6 and some) the videoteam focussed on getting the post processing done and the videos released, and streaming was optional, even though it was an exciting new feature and we still managed to stream mostly all we recorded and sometimes more...

  • DSLR Motion Capture with Raspberry Pi and OpenCV
  • mOLOID is a pet like no other

    As a part of their masters program at the University of Stuttgart, Jan Ingo Haller and Lorin Samija created a robotic pet that moves in a manner that may not be immediately evident. With the internals obscured by a cloth covering, the moving OLOID, or mOLOID, seems to roll from one vague lobe section to another like some sort of claymation creature. The mOLOID’s unique locomotion is due to an internal “oloid” structure, an arrangement of two circles at 90°. Two servos move weights around the perimeter of each circle to vary its center of gravity, causing it to flop back and forth.

  • How to speed up the Rust compiler some more in 2020

    First up is a process change: I have started doing weekly performance triage. Each Tuesday I have been looking at the performance results of all the PRs merged in the past week. For each PR that has regressed or improved performance by a non-negligible amount, I add a comment to the PR with a link to the measurements. I also gather these results into a weekly report, which is mentioned in This Week in Rust, and also looked at in the weekly compiler team meeting. The goal of this is to ensure that regressions are caught quickly and appropriate action is taken, and to raise awareness of performance issues in general. It takes me about 45 minutes each time. The instructions are written in such a way that anyone can do it, though it will take a bit of practice for newcomers to become comfortable with the process. I have started sharing the task around, with Mark Rousskov doing the most recent triage. This process change was inspired by the “Regressions prevented” section of an excellent blost post from Nikita Popov (a.k.a. nikic), about the work they have been doing to improve the speed of LLVM. (The process also takes some ideas from the Firefox Nightly crash triage that I set up a few years ago when I was leading Project Uptime.)

  • Data@Mozilla: Experimental integration Glean with Unity applications

    You might notice Firefox Reality PC Preview has been released in HTC’s Viveport store. That is a VR web browser that provides 2D overlay browsing alongside immersive content and supports web-based immersive experiences for PC-connected VR headsets. In order to easily deploy our product into the Viveport store, we take advantage of Unity to help make our application launcher. Also because of that, it brings us another challenge about how to use Mozilla’s existing telemetry system. As we know, Glean SDK has provided language bindings for different programming language requirements that include Kotlin, Swift, and Python. However, when we are talking about supporting applications that use Unity as their development toolkit, there are no existing bindings available to help us achieve it. Unity allows users using a Python interpreter to embed Python scripts in a Unity project; however, due to Unity’s technology being based on the Mono framework, that is not the same as our familiar Python runtime for running Python scripts. So, the alternative way we need to find out is how to run Python on .Net Framework or exactly on Mono framework. If we are discussing possible approaches to run Python script in the main process, using IronPython is the only solution. However, it is only available for Python 2.7, and the Glean SDK Python language binding needs Python 3.6. Hence, we start our plans to develop a new Glean binding for C#.

  • WordPress 5.5 Release Candidate 2

    The second release candidate for WordPress 5.5 is here! WordPress 5.5 is slated for release on August 11, 2020, but we need your help to get there—if you haven’t tried 5.5 yet, now is the time!

  • Podcast: CLUECON SPECIAL FEATURE – OrecX not only delivers top shelf stereo recording, but delivers a huge ecosystem of add on technology that may already provide the capability you want to use

    Bruce and OrecX have also been attending the ClueCON Conference from the beginning. The founders of OrecX are open source recording pioneers, launching the Oreka GPL in 2005 (used today by millions in over 190 countries).

The 10 Best KDE Plasma Widgets for KDE Desktop Environment

If you were looking for the best KDE Plasma widgets for your Linux desktop, then you are in the right place. There is much debate about the fact of who implemented the widget feature first on a computer GUI. But nobody can deny that the widgets have brought a new era in the modern user interface. Most of the people rely on beautiful widgets for performing different tasks without opening the main instance of the program. Although Windows ditched their native desktop widgets feature with their Windows 8 for the sake of the live tiles. Linux still has a great library of widgets that are being maintained by the developer community. Read more

Stable Kernels: 5.7.13, 5.4.56, 4.19.137, and 4.14.192

  • Linux 5.7.13
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.7.13 kernel. All users of the 5.7 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.7.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.7.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 5.4.56
  • Linux 4.19.137
  • Linux 4.14.192