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BSD Leftovers

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BSD
  • FreeBSD 11.0 Alpha 5 Released, Schedule So Far Going On Track

    The fifth alpha release of the huge FreeBSD 11.0 operating system update is now available for testing.

    FreeBSD 11.0 is bringing updated KMS drivers, Linux binary compatibility layer improvements, UEFI improvements, Bhyve virtualization improvements, and a wide range of other enhancements outlined via the in-progress release notes.

  • DragonFly's HAMMER2 File-System Sees Some Improvements

    The HAMMER2 file-system is going on four years in development by the DragonFlyBSD crew, namely by its founder Matthew Dillon. It's still maturing and taking longer than anticipated, but this is yet another open-source file-system.

FreeBSD 11 Alpha 1 — New Features Coming To This Open Source OS

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BSD

For those unfamiliar with FreeBSD, it is considered one of the few operating systems left to be true UNIX. It is a direct descendant of the BELL/AT&T labs UNIX. Much of the software available for Linux is also available for FreeBSD as well, including Gnome and KDE desktop environments and much more user and server software. Despite the amount of software available, it is often thought of as an obscure system with a rather small software library. This is simply

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FreeBSD 11.0 Alpha 4 Released

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BSD

The fourth alpha release of the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 is now available for testing.

FreeBSD 11.0 Alpha 4 ships the very latest fixes for this major BSD update. FreeBSD 11.0 is scheduled to be officially released in early September with the code freeze happening last week, the beta builds beginning in July, and release candidates in August. The FreeBSD 11.0 schedule can be found via FreeBSD.org.

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Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • BSDCan 2016 Presentations Online
  • LLVM's Clang Is Working On Unified Offloading Support

    There's more work going on in the CUDA/OpenMP space for the LLVM Clang compiler.

    Landing this week in Clang SVN/Git is generic offload toolchains for the concept of an offloading tool chain plus related work. The initial patch explains, "This patch is the first of a series of three that attempts to make the current support of CUDA more generic and easier to extend to other programming models, namely OpenMP."

Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • ART single thread performances

    ART has been the default routing table backend in OpenBSD for some months now. That means that OpenBSD 6.0 will no longer consult the 4.3 BSD reduced radix tree to perform route lookups.

    The principal motivation for adopting a new tree implementation can be explained in three letters: SMP.

    I'll describe in a different context why and how ART is a good fit in our revamp of OpenBSD network stack. For the moment, let's have a look at the single-thread performances of this algorithm in OpenBSD -current.

  • parallel-lib: New LLVM Suproject
  • LLVM Has New "parallel-lib" Sub-Project

    This new parallelism library is described as "[hosting] the development of libraries which are aimed at enabling parallelism in code and which are also closely tied to compiler technology. Examples of libraries suitable for hosting within the parallel-libs subproject are runtime libraries and parallel math libraries. The initial candidates for inclusion in this subproject are StreamExecutor and libomptarget which would live in the streamexecutor and libomptarget subdirectories of parallel-libs, respectively."

pfSense 2.3.1 FreeBSD Firewall Gets New Update to Patch Web GUI Security Issues

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Security
BSD

Chris Buechler from pfSense announced earlier today, June 16, 2016, that there's a new maintenance update available for the pfSense 2.3.1 FreeBSD-based firewall distribution.

pfSense 2.3.1 Update 5 (2.3.1_5) is a small bugfix release for the pfSense 2.3.1 major update announced last month, and since pfSense now lets its maintainers update only individual parts of the system, we see more and more small builds like this one, which patch the most annoying issues.

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LLVM

Filed under
Development
BSD

Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • pkgsrc 50th release interviews - Jonathan Perkin

    The pkgsrc team has prepared the 50th release of their package management system, with the 2016Q1 version. It's infrequent event, as the 100th release will be held after 50 quarters.

    The NetBSD team has prepared series of interviews with the authors. The next one is with Jonathan Perkin, a developer in the Joyent team.

  • FreeBSD on Microsoft Azure [iophk: "It's just a one hour, non-technical sales pitch from a marketeer. BSDCan used to be a technical conference. The selection committee really failed on this one."]

Microsoft Creates Its Own Distribution Of FreeBSD Operating System

Filed under
Microsoft
BSD

Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • Why I Run OpenBSD

    This post is about my journey down the OS rabbit hole and how it landed me in OpenBSD land as a happy and productive user.

    It contains information that is highly opinionated, wildly inaccurate, mostly speculation. It is, after all, on the internet!

  • bsdtalk265 - Sunset on BSD

    A brief description of playing around with SunOS 4.1.4, which was the last version of SunOS to be based on BSD.

  • LibreSSL 2.4 Released
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today's leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Security Leftovers

  • Chrome vulnerability lets attackers steal movies from streaming services
    A significant security vulnerability in Google technology that is supposed to protect videos streamed via Google Chrome has been discovered by researchers from the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Cyber Security Research Center (CSRC) in collaboration with a security researcher from Telekom Innovation Laboratories in Berlin, Germany.
  • Large botnet of CCTV devices knock the snot out of jewelry website
    Researchers have encountered a denial-of-service botnet that's made up of more than 25,000 Internet-connected closed circuit TV devices. The researchers with Security firm Sucuri came across the malicious network while defending a small brick-and-mortar jewelry shop against a distributed denial-of-service attack. The unnamed site was choking on an assault that delivered almost 35,000 HTTP requests per second, making it unreachable to legitimate users. When Sucuri used a network addressing and routing system known as Anycast to neutralize the attack, the assailants increased the number of HTTP requests to 50,000 per second.
  • Study finds Password Misuse in Hospitals a Steaming Hot Mess
    Hospitals are pretty hygienic places – except when it comes to passwords, it seems. That’s the conclusion of a recent study by researchers at Dartmouth College, the University of Pennsylvania and USC, which found that efforts to circumvent password protections are “endemic” in healthcare environments and mostly go unnoticed by hospital IT staff. The report describes what can only be described as wholesale abandonment of security best practices at hospitals and other clinical environments – with the bad behavior being driven by necessity rather than malice.
  • Why are hackers increasingly targeting the healthcare industry?
    Cyber-attacks in the healthcare environment are on the rise, with recent research suggesting that critical healthcare systems could be vulnerable to attack. In general, the healthcare industry is proving lucrative for cybercriminals because medical data can be used in multiple ways, for example fraud or identify theft. This personal data often contains information regarding a patient’s medical history, which could be used in targeted spear-phishing attacks.
  • Making the internet more secure
  • Beyond Monocultures
  • Dodging Raindrops Escaping the Public Cloud