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Slack

Slackware Linux 13.1 arrives

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Slack

slackware.com: Yes, it's that time again! After many months of development and careful testing, we are proud to announce the release of Slackware version 13.1!

Slackware Linux 13.1 screenshots

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zdnet.com.au: If you've grown tired of all the hand-holding utilities in Ubuntu or Fedora, then look no further than Slackware.

Slackage Management, Baby!

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lockergnome.com: There are those who say that Slackware Linux doesn’t really have a package manager. BAH! I say. It has two package management systems, actually.

Get Slack!

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lockergnome.com: Like most X-MS Windows users, I did not come to Slackware directly. I took a round-about route through a few other distributions first.

Slackware 13 Revisit

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ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: In my Slackware 13 review mfillpot gave some suggestions to improve the Slackware experience and I thought I would give them a shot.

Ode to Slackware

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slackstuff.com: I have a place reserved in my heart that only Slackware Linux fills. Strange as it might be, Slackware was the first Linux distribution that seemed to understand me and, I it. I recently read an article which brought to mind, the time that I started my venture into Linux.

Slackware Linux - Less is more

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itpro.co.uk: Slackware is the oldest Linux distribution still with us and has a loyal following among those long term Linux users who pine for the old fashioned virtues of simplicity, straightforwardness and lack of bloat.

some words about Slackware

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mysticalgr.awardspace: some guys over at TechCrunch UK (or something like that) made a review of 8 linux distributions which ships KDE as their default graphical desktop. the first one? Slackware…

Review: Slackware 13.0

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ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: When Slackware 13 came a few months ago on the LXF magazine, I decided to throw it into Virtualbox to see how it has changed. One difference this time around is that I now have the dual core machine so I am running Slackware on that machine.

Pimp my Slack!

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HowTos

pdg86.wordpress: I am a KDE fan. Besides the eye-candy, I love the KDE apps. This article is about what I did with my default Slackware install to make it more beautiful. I will be using Slackware 13.0 with vbatts KDE4.3.1 packages.

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