Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Slack

Slackware Live Edition – Beta 2

Filed under
Slack
  • Slackware Live Edition – Beta 2

    Thanks for all the valuable feedback on the first public beta of my Slackware Live Edition. It allowed me to fix quite a few bugs in the Live scripts (thanks again!), add new functionality (requested by you or from my own TODO) and I took the opportunity to fix the packages in my Plasma 5 repository so that its Live Edition should actually work now.

  • Updated multilib packages for -current
  • (Hopefully) final recompilations for KDE 5_15.11

    There was still some work to do about my Plasma 5 package repository. The recent updates in slackware-current broke several packages that were still linking to older (and no longer present) libraries which were part of the icu4c and udev packages.

5 open-source alternatives to Slack

Filed under
OSS
Slack

Here are five full-featured Slack alternatives — tools that go beyond IRC, in other words — that are open-source software, which means you can download it and run it on whatever server you want. That implies that you’re in charge of security, for better or worse, instead of, say, Slack.

Read more

ArchEX Build 151117 Has Been Released, Other New Releases

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Slack

As you may know, ArchEX is an Arch Linux flavor that uses LXDE as the default desktop environment to provide a lightweight system, usable on old, low-power computers.

The latest version available is ArchEX Build 151117, which has been updated to use the latest Arch Linux version available and Kernel 4.2.5, among others. Also, a new text-based installer has been implemented, this one permitting the users to choose the default language during installation and GParted has been added, for an easier partition management.

Read more

Also new: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 Screenshot Tour

Slackware: GCC 5.2.0 multilib

LibreOffice 5.0.3 and new steamclient

Cleanups from the -current update fallout

Slackware Live Edition

Filed under
Slack

I thought it would be a cool idea to celebrate the “farewell to udev”. With the abandoned ConsoleKit replaced by ConsoleKit2 which is actively maintained by the Slackware-friendly XFCE crew, and Gentoo’s eudev taking the place of udev, we are well equipped to keep systemd out of our distro for a while. Basically eudev contains the udev code as found in the systemd sources, but then stripped from all standards-violating systemd crap and with a sane build system. Hooray, we’re back in business and eudev gained some more traction. Win-win.

Read more

Puppy Linux 6.3 "Slacko" Comes to Play, Based on Slackware 14.1 and Linux Kernel 4.1

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Slack

Barry Kauler, the creator of the Puppy Linux computer operating system, has had the great pleasure of announcing today, November 17, the release and immediate availability for download of Puppy Linux 6.3 "Slacko."

Read more

New in Slackware

Filed under
Slack
  • KDE 5_15.11 for Slackware-current – visual improvements

    In one of my previous articles, where I wrote about the upcoming Slackware Live edition, I added some premature screenshots of the Plasma 5 packages I am announcing today. Just when I was preparing for upload, Pat released his big November 14th batch of updates to Slackware-current (including new kernel, compilers and X.Org), dubbing it “almost a beta”. That delayed the release process for my November Plasma 5 packages because I needed to check the impact of these updates to my already compiled packages.

  • Last week’s security updates

A Real Honest-to-Goodness Live Slackware Coming Soon

Filed under
Slack

There is Porteus and SLAX, but no real Slackware live. Perhaps that's about to change. Should Linux users live in fear of viruses and malware as Windows users do? Mel Khanlichi answered today. SteamOS was found to be lagging behind Windows performance for gaming and Josh Fruhlinger found 10 odds places for Linux. All this and more in today's Linux news.

Read more

Slackel Linux: Not Your Father's Slackware

Filed under
Reviews
Slack

You might think of the Slackel distro as a better Slackware derivative. Slackware dates back to 1992. By comparison, well-known and well-used distros such as Ubuntu, Fedora and Linux Mint were introduced in the mid-2000s. So Slackware is among the oldest actively maintained Linux distros. Despite its longevity, it has not joined more modern Linux offspring in terms of user friendliness.

Read more

Unofficial Linux Kernel 4.2.2 Now Available for Slackware 12.0 and Its Derivatives

Filed under
Linux
Slack

Arne Exton, the developer of numerous Linux kernel-based and Android-x86 distributions, was happy to inform Softpedia about the release of a custom kernel for the Slackware 12.0 operating system and its derivatives.

Read more

Slackware Packages

Filed under
Slack
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

ownCloud Desktop Client 2.2.4 Released with Updated Dolphin Plugin, Bug Fixes

ownCloud is still alive and kicking, and they've recently released a new maintenance update of the ownCloud Desktop Client, version 2.2.4, bringing some much-needed improvements and patching various annoying issues. Read more

Early Benchmarks Of The Linux 4.9 DRM-Next Radeon/AMDGPU Drivers

While Linux 4.9 will not officially open for development until next week, the DRM-Next code is ready to roll with all major feature work having been committed by the different open-source Direct Rendering Manager drivers. In this article is some preliminary testing of this DRM-Next code as of 29 September when testing various AMD GPUs with the Radeon and AMDGPU DRM drivers. Linux 4.9 does bring compile-time-offered experimental support for the AMD Southern Islands GCN 1.0 hardware on AMDGPU, but that isn't the focus of this article. A follow-up comparison is being done with GCN 1.0/1.1 experimental support enabled to see the Radeon vs. AMDGPU performance difference on that hardware. For today's testing was a Radeon R7 370 to look at the Radeon DRM performance and for AMDGPU testing was the Radeon R9 285, R9 Fury, and RX 480. Benchmarks were done from the Linux 4.8 Git and Linux DRM-Next kernels as of 29 September. Read more

How to Effectively and Efficiently Edit Configuration Files in Linux

Every Linux administrator has to eventually (and manually) edit a configuration file. Whether you are setting up a web server, configuring a service to connect to a database, tweaking a bash script, or troubleshooting a network connection, you cannot avoid a dive deep into the heart of one or more configuration files. To some, the prospect of manually editing configuration files is akin to a nightmare. Wading through what seems like countless lines of options and comments can put you on the fast track for hair and sanity loss. Which, of course, isn’t true. In fact, most Linux administrators enjoy a good debugging or configuration challenge. Sifting through the minutiae of how a server or software functions is a great way to pass time. But this process doesn’t have to be an exercise in ineffective inefficiency. In fact, tools are available to you that go a very long way to make the editing of config files much, much easier. I’m going to introduce you to a few such tools, to ease some of the burden of your Linux admin duties. I’ll first discuss the command-line tools that are invaluable to the task of making configuration more efficient. Read more

Why Good Linux Sysadmins Use Markdown

The Markdown markup language is perfect for writing system administrator documentation: it is lightweight, versatile, and easy to learn, so you spend your time writing instead of fighting with formatting. The life of a Linux system administrator is complex and varied, and you know that documenting your work is a big time-saver. A documentation web server shared by you and your colleagues is a wonderful productivity tool. Most of us know simple HTML, and can whack up a web page as easily as writing plain text. But using Markdown is better. Read more