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Slack

Porteus Kiosk Edition Is an Operating System Based on Slackware and Firefox

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OS
Moz/FF
Slack

Porteus 3.1 (Kiosk Edition) is based on Slackware 14.0 and relies on Linux kernel 3.12.20 and Firefox 24.0. It's a 32-bit system, which is entirely locked down to prevent tampering with any of the components (including the browser).

“This distribution release includes bug fixes, software updates and new features. At a mere 50 megabytes, the Porteus Kiosk Edition ISO includes just the libraries and utilities required to run Firefox in a secure environment, making this a perfect fit for kiosks and other web terminals.”

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Slackware-Based Salix Openbox 14.1 Beta 1 Is Out and Ready for Testing

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Slack

Salix Openbox 14.1 Beta 1, a GNU/Linux distribution based on Slackware that is simple, fast, easy to use, and based on the Openbox window manager, has been released and is now available for download.

The Openbox version of Salix has been released has arrived and it’s pretty similar with the previous flavors that have been made available until now in this branch. This window manager is a very light one, which means that it can run on low-end hardware and on old computers.

“The 32-bit iso image includes both SMP (multiple processor capable) and non-SMP (single processor) kernels. The non-SMP kernel is mostly intended for machines that can’t run the SMP kernel, which is anything older than a Pentium III, and some models of the Pentium M that don’t support PAE.”

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Slackware Release Announcement [14.1]

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Slack

Yes, it is that time again! After well over a year of planning, development, and testing, the Slackware Linux Project is proud to announce the latest stable release of the longest running distribution of the Linux operating system, Slackware version 14.1!

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Slackware 14.1 on Its Way

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Slack

ostatic.com: Just when we needed some exciting development news Patrick Volkerding declared Current Beta, 14.1 is officially on its way! Distrowatch.com's top-secret webcrawler found the tidbit in this morning's changelog.

Slackware Turns 20

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Linux
Slack

ostatic.com: Slackware Linux turned 20 years old yesterday and no one gave them a party. Even I, who commonly remembered the illustrious distribution's birthdays in my now former column, had to be reminded by LWN. Well, that won't do.

Ten reasons to choose Slackware Linux

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Slack

kikinovak.net: This summer, the Slackware Linux distribution will celebrate its twentieth anniversary. Here's a list of ten reasons why Slackware is still the perfect choice.

Slackpkg Update Fixes Long Standing Annoyance

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Slack

ostatic.com: Slackware's Slackpkg has long had a design flaw that could result in inoperative applications or systems. But Patrick Volkerding recently addressed the issue with a simple but significant change.

Will there ever be a perfect operating system?

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OS
Linux
Slack
SUSE
  • Will there ever be a perfect operating system?
  • Running Slackware-Current
  • OpenSuSE 12.3 – the Cheater
  • elementary OS 0.2 review - Uphill
  • Review: Fuduntu 2013.2
  • North by (Linux Fest) Northwest
  • Fedora 19 Alpha Version Arrives
  • This week in rawhide 2013-04-23 edition
  • Mandriva Business Server gets updates
  • Lightweight openSUSE: LXDE Desktop From Scratch
  • Fedora 19 Sneak Peek
  • ROSA ABF 2.0
  • Release date for Wheezy announced
  • Manjaro: A Convenient Way To Play With Arch

Linux Potpourri: Slack Current, KDELyteDEsktop, and Sabayon systemd

Filed under
KDE
Linux
Slack

ostatic.com: I've gotten a bit behind the last few days and here are a few items I wanted to report about. Patrick Volkerding says Slackware Current is too current. Will Stephenson is developing a lighter KDE desktop. And Sabayon has implemented systemd.

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today's leftovers

Leftovers: Software

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    Finally, after many iterations, we have something that works! The ocs-server team (Claudio Desideri and Francesco Wofford) is therefore announcing the first release of ocs-server 0.1 technology preview.
  • 5 Less known Linux Admin Tools
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    dmMediaConverter is described by its developer as an FFmpeg frontend (GUI), but regular users only need to know that it's an application that allows them to quickly convert files from one format to another, in a simple and intuitive way. It's not the best looking out there, but it gets the job done.
  • Goggles Music Manager 1.0.7 Adds Support for Ratings and Tags to Filters, More
    On July 30, the developers of the Goggles Music Manager software, an open-source music collection manager and player that supports some of the most popular audio file formats, announced the release of version 1.0.7.
  • Semi-Official Google Drive Support For Linux Arrives, What's Next?
    Three years ago, when a user would attempt to download the Google Drive Sync Client, Google would bring them to the appropriate download page, which of course, is based off of the operating system that user is running on. If a user would attempt to download the Google Drive Sync Client while running on Linux, they’d land on a page where the message reads: “Not (yet) supported for Linux.” So, what’s the deal with Google not developing a sync client for Linux users, seeing as to how they build a lot of their things using Linux? There’s one simple answer to that, unfortunately. Windows is mainstream, so a lot of their focus is put on what a majority of people use. The bigger the market, the more money in their pockets, of course. But don’t fear, change is near!

today's howtos