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Slack

Slackware-Based Slackel 7.4 Released with Linux Kernel 5.10 LTS, Full Portability

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Slack

Coming six months after Slackel 7.3, the Slackel 7.4 release is now available in a lightweight form with the Openbox window manager by default. KDE Plasma and MATE editions may follow in the next days or weeks, but for now let's have a look at the general changes that apply to all of them.

First and foremost, Slackel is now powered by the latest and greatest Linux 5.10 LTS kernel series, which means top-notch hardware support. Slackel 7.4 includes the recently released Linux kernel 5.10.4 by default, and also comes with all the latest updates from Slackware’s ‘Current’ tree for the best possible Slackware Linux experience.

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Today, Plasma5 replaces KDE4 in Slackware

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KDE
Slack

Finally. It’s the major step towards a first Beta release of Slackware 15.0!

Pat used this past weekend to merge the ‘vtown’ packages in the Slackware-current testing area into the core distro. The result is a ChangeLog.txt entry that is 680 lines long… lots of package removals due to KDE4 having been replaced with Plasma5.

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Slackware-Based SlackEX Linux Now Ships with Latest Enlightenment Desktop

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Slack

Based on Slackware 14.2, the new SlackEX Linux release drops the lightweight Xfce desktop environment for the even more lighter and beautiful Enlightenment desktop environment/window manager. In fact, SlackEX appears to be the only live system that uses the latest Enlightenment release, version 0.24.2.

But that's not all that' new in the latest SlackEX Linux release, which is now powered by the Linux 5.9 kernel series. This not only means better hardware support, but it also means you won't find another Slackware-based live system running Linux kernel 5.9.

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Ktown becomes Vtown

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KDE
Slack

So it is finally happening.
On US Election Day 2020, Pat Volkerding added “vtown” into the ‘testing’ directory of Slackware-current.

The “vtown” in Slackware is essentially my ‘ktown’ repository containing KDE Plasma5 plus its dependencies, with a few exceptions, a number of my packages removed, some caveats and a couple of renamed packages.

A lot of useful information from early adopters can already be found on linuxquestions.org in the dedicated thread about vtown.

One of the benefits of this testing version of Plasma5 in Slackware is the merging of several Slackware and ktown packages.
Mostly because I needed to provide Qt5-supporting versions of existing Slackware packages, I needed different names for the ‘ktown’ versions that I was going to provide. I could not risk that people would end up with old Slackware Qt4 based packages which would break Plasma5.
So to avoid clashing with packages like “plasma-nm”, “attica”, “baloo”, “kscreen” etc… I had to use alternative package names like “plasma5-nm”, “attica-framework”, “baloo5”, “kscreen2” and several (actually, many) more.
Here is the full list of my packages that got merged back into packages with the original Slackware names...

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Distros: Absolute64, OpenMandriva, and Ubuntu

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GNU
Linux
MDV
Slack
Ubuntu
  • Absolute64-20201103 released

    Based on Slackware64-current.
    Keeping up with wholesale library changes (especially python) and kernels, etc...
    (Will there ever be a Slackware 15?)
    Edited some utilities to adjust to new libs.
    Tighten up the UI/mime/icons.

  • Progress on OMLx 4.2

    Work continues on OMLx 4.2. It is anticipated that Beta release should be happening in the next week or two.

  • Accessibility audit of Vanilla framework | Ubuntu

    The team behind the Vanilla Framework has a background in development, UX and Visual Design. We all care about accessibility, but none of us is an accessibility expert.

    We were interested in evaluating how well the framework complies with accessibility standards. We decided to start with an internal audit, fix any issues we find, then look for a third-party service to evaluate the framework from the perspective of real-world users with disabilities

The Earliest Linux Distros: Before Mainstream Distros Became So Popular

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GNU
Linux
Slack

In here we have tried to explore how the idea of popular distros such as Red Hat, Debian, Slackware, SUSE, Ubuntu and many others came into being after the first Linux kernel became available.

As Linux was initially released in the form of a kernel in 1991, the distros we know today was made possible with the help of numerous collaborators throughout the world with the creation of shells, libraries, compilers and related packages to make it a complete Operating System.

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LibreOffice 6.4.5 finally for Slackware 14.2

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LibO
Slack

The Document Foundation recently released version 7.0.0 of their Libre Office suite of applications. The packages for Slackware-current can be found in my repository. But the situation for Slackware 14.2 used to be different – I got stuck after LibreOffice 6.2 because the newer source releases (6.3 and onwards) require versions of system software that our stable Slackware 14.2 platform does not offer.

From time to time during the last year, when there was time and the build box was not compiling packages, I messed around with the libreoffice.SlackBuild script in futile attempts to compile recent versions of LibreOffice on Slackware 14.2. I failed all the time.
Until last week. After I had uploaded the new KDE Plasma5 packages to ‘ktown‘, I had an epiphany and decided to use a new approach. What I did was: question all the historic stuff in the SlackBuild script that got added whenever I needed to work around compilation failures; and accept that the compilation needs newer versions of software than Slackware 14.2 offers. The first statement meant that I disabled patches and variable declarations that messed with compiler and linker; and for the second statement I stuck to a single guideline: the end product, if I were able to compile a package successfully, has to run out of the box on Slackware 14.2 without the need to update any of the core Slackware packages.

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Porteus 5.0-rc2 Released: Slackware-Based Fast And Portable Linux Distro

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Linux
Slack

More than a year later, the Dev team of Porteus Linux has finally announced the second release candidate (RC-2) for its upcoming version 5.0. This means you can now try the new testing version Porteus 5.0-rc2.

For those who don’t know, Porteus is based on one of the oldest Linux distros, Slackware. It was also formerly known as Slax remix when it started as a community remix of Slax OS.

Porteus aims to provide a portable, fast, and light operating system that you can boot directly in less than 15 seconds (in the case of LXDE desktop) from CD, USB flash drive, hard drive, or other bootable storage media.

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KDE Plasma 5 August 2020 release for Slackware

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KDE
Slack

New Plasma5 packages for Slackware-current are ready for download & installation. I skipped July (holiday season) and so here is KDE-5_20.08 aka my August 2020 release. Be sure to read the upgrade instructions very carefully to prevent breakage, because starting with my June batch the goal is to remove Slackware’s ConsoleKit2 and replace it with elogind!.

It would not harm if you (re-)read my previous blog article about Plasma5, “Replacing ConsoleKit2 with elogind – first steps“. It has a lot more detail about the reasons for this move as well as guidance on using the Wayland Window Manager (as a test) instead of regular X.Org. Note that Wayland sessions still need a lot of maturing and X.Org will remain Slackware’s default choice.

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Slackel 7.3 Mate beta1

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Slack

Slackel 7.3 Mate beta1 has been released. Slackel is based on Slackware and Salix.

Includes the Linux kernel 5.4.50, Mate-1.22.1 and latest updates from Slackware's 'Current' tree.
Added support to do a real installation to an external usb stick or usb ssd or usb hard disk.

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More in Tux Machines

Raspberry Pi Foundation Release Their Own Silicon, the Raspberry Pi Pico

It was about time for the Raspberry Pi Foundation to release their own silicon, so here it is guys! Meet Raspberry Pi Pico, the result of several years of hard work designed to offer Raspberry Pi owners and anyone else who like building their own hardware high performance for integer workloads, flexible I/O, and low cost. Raspberry Pi Pico is built on the RP2040 microcontroller chip, which features a dual-core ARM Cortex-M0+ processor running at 133MHz, 264KB of on-chip RAM, support for up to 16MB of off-chip flash memory via a dedicated QSPI bus, DMA controller, as well as interpolator and integer divider peripherals. Read more

TUXEDO InfinityBook S 15 Linux Laptop Launches with Tiger Lake CPUs, Ultra Thin Design

Meet TUXEDO InfinityBook S 15, the smallest 15.6-inch Linux laptop offering from TUXEDO Computers that does not disappoint on any aspect. Its biggest attraction is the ultra thin design with 92 percent screen-to-body ratio and very compact design that can only be found on 14-inch laptops. The ultra modern and thin design is due to the 15.6-inch Full HD (1920×1080 pixels) IPS display featuring approximately 300 nits brightness, 800:1 contrast, 95% sRGB color gamut, and anti-reflective / non-glare coating, as well as the monocolor (white) backlit keyboard with TUX super-key, and a clickpad with multi-touch gestures. Read more

Debian based PinePhone Mobian Edition Review. Spec, Price, and More.

We take a detailed look at the PinePhone Mobian Edition and give you a perspective on the features, prices and comparisions. Read more

today's howtos

  • How Do I Change UEFI Settings? – Linux Hint

    When you are using Linux, of any distribution, you sometimes need to look at settings for the UEFI. The reasons vary; you may have a dual-boot system and cannot find the other boot option, maybe you want to have it boot securely, or, in some cases, you want to turn secure boot off so you can boot anything.

  • How to Deploy GraphQL Application Using Node.js on EC2 Server – Linux Hint

    GraphQL, also known as Graph Query Language, established and maintained by Facebook, is a query language used for APIs. It is built using JavaScript, Scala, Java, and Ruby programming languages. Its basic purpose is to ask for the data from server to client.GraphQL aggregates the data from different sources. Aggregation is the process of filtering data on the server side and then sending the filtered data to the client. Without aggregation, we send all the data to the client, and then the data is filtered at the client-side. This makes the system slow, and we can improve the efficiency of an API by using GraphQL. Here we will learn to deploy a simple GraphQL application using node.js on an EC2 server.

  • How to Install OpenJDK on Fedora Linux – Linux Hint

    Java is a general-purpose programming language offering reliability, security, and compatibility. Java is everywhere – mobile apps, desktop programs, web applications, and enterprise systems. To build Java apps, developers need the JDK (Java Development Kit) that comes with all the essential tools. In this guide, check out how to install OpenJDK on Fedora Linux.

  • Ultimate Guide to Install Flask on Ubuntu

    Flask is an open-source and free micro web-based python framework, designed to help programmers for building scalable, secure, and easily maintainable web applications. If you are a beginner, then, it’s quite easy and simple to start. We will tell you in this article how to install the python framework Flask on Ubuntu 20.04 system. The commands we have implemented can also run on Debian and old Ubuntu distributions.

  • How to Install Linux Apps Using the Snap Store – Linux Hint

    Snap store is a desktop application used to find, install, and manage apps(also known as snaps) on Linux platforms. It shows all of the featured and famous applications with a thorough description, reviews, screenshots, and ratings. You can easily search for a specific application then download it on your system. Snap store always keeps users’ data secure and safe so that no one can access the data without your permission. Snap store is a similar platform to Google app store as a user can download any Linux supported application easily from it. It is good to use the Snap store in your system to cover complete details on how to install Linux apps using the Snap store in this article. Snap store installation is almost the same for every Linux distro; read the article below to install snap store and download applications completely.

  • How to Install SysStat to Enable System Monitoring on Debian 10? – Linux Hint

    SysStat is a very useful utility for Linux based systems that are used for effectively monitoring your system. With system monitoring, you can easily figure out all the potential issues in your system, and hence, you can keenly observe the activities going on in your system. In this article, we are going to explain to you the procedure of installing SysStat to enable system monitoring on Debian 10.

  • How to Setup vsftpd FTP Server on Debian 10? – Linux Hint

    Vsftpd (Very Secure FTP Daemon), licensed under GNU General Public License, is an FTP protocol used to transfer files to and from a remote network. It is a secure, stable, and fast FTP server that is supported on Linux/UNIX operating systems. In this post, we will learn how to set up a vsftpd FTP server on the Debian system.

  • Tweaks for OpenEmbedded Dunfell

    I am currently working on changes to my fork of OE, Dunfell release. Working through a to-do list, here is progress so far... When I compiled LibreOffice recently on the Pi4, was unable to use the 'boost', 'harfbuzz' and 'neon' system packages, had to use internal versions. This is duplication, means that the final LibreOffice binary package will be bigger that is could be.

  • Installing Steam on Fedora Linux – Linux Hint

    Vsftpd (Very Secure FTP Daemon) is a secure, stable, and fast FTP protocol used to transfer files to and from a remote network. In this article, we’ll discuss how to setup vsftpd FTP server on Debian 10 machine to easily access and upload/download files to and from your FTP server.

  • BRL‑CAD : Open-Source Solid Modeling CAD Software

    Are you looking for open-source solid modeling software for your Linux PC? We recommend you try BRL-CAD. FOSS Linux brings you a detailed guide on its set up and usage.