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Fluxbox

Mozilla: More on IRC (or Less of IRC), Firefox Nightly and Mozilla's 'IoT'

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Fluxbox
  • The Rust Programming Language Blog: Mozilla IRC Sunset and the Rust Channel

    The Rust community has had a presence on Mozilla’s IRC network almost since Rust’s inception. Over time, the single channel grew into a set of pretty active channels where folks would come to ask Rust questions, coordinate work on Rust itself, and just in general chat about Rust.

    Mozilla recently announced that it would be shutting down its IRC network, citing a growing maintenance and moderation burden. They are looking into new options for the Mozilla community, but this does leave the question open as to what the Rust project will do.

    Last year a lot of the teams started exploring new communication platforms. Almost all the Rust teams no longer use IRC as their official discussion platform, instead using Discord or Zulip (as well as a variety of video chat tools for synchronous meetings). The few teams that do use IRC are working with us to find a new home, likely a channel on Discord or Zulip.

    This leaves the #rust and #rust-beginners channels on Mozilla’s IRC network, which are still quite active, that will need a new home when Mozilla’s network shuts down. Rust’s official Discord server does have the #users, #help, and #beginners channels that fill in this purpose, and we recommend people start using those.

  • irc.mozilla.org

    I remember the very first time I used IRC. It was 2004, and earlier in the week I had met with Mike Shaver at Seneca, probably for the first time, and he'd ended our meeting with a phrase I'd never heard before, but I nodded knowingly nevertheless: "Ping me in #developers."

    Ping me. What on earth did that mean!? Little did I know that this phrase would come to signify so much about the next decade of my life. After some research and initial trial and error, 'dave' joined irc.mozilla.org and found his way to the unlisted #developers channel. And there was 'shaver', along with 300 or so other #developers.

    The immediacy of it was unlike anything I'd used before (or since). To join irc was to be transported somewhere else. You weren't anywhere, or rather, you were simultaneously everywhere. For many of these years I was connecting to irc from an old farm house in the middle of rural Ontario over a satellite internet connection. But when I got online, there in the channels with me were people from New Zealand, the US, Sweden, and everywhere in between.

  • Firefox Nightly: These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 58

    Continuing on fixing regressions in QuantumBar, including improvements for RTL, less visual flicker and lots more.

  • Mozilla's IoT relaunches, sun-based GPS, and more news

    As you might expect, Mozilla has irons in a number of open source fires. Over the last two weeks, Mozilla has gone public with two significant projects.

    The first one is Pyodide. It's an "experimental Python project that’s designed to perform computation" from within a browser window. While other projects are also attempting to bring Python interpreters to the web browser, Pyodide "doesn’t require a rewrite of popular scientific computing tools (like NumPy, Pandas, Scipy, and Matplotlib) to achieve adequate performance."

    The second project is an IoT platform called Mozilla WebThings. WebThings isn't new. It's the grown up version of the organization's Project Things platform "for monitoring and controlling connected devices." The latest version of WebThings add features for logging and visualizing data from your smart devices, as well as monitoring and triggering alarms from internet-connected detectors. You can learn more at the Mozilla IoT site.

Mozilla: Mozilla Developer Roadshow, Mozilla Localization, A "moral obligation to use Firefox" and Release for Vista 10

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Fluxbox
  • Developer Roadshow 2019 returns with VR, IoT and all things web

    Mozilla Developer Roadshow is a meetup-style, Mozilla-focused event series for people who build the web. In 2017, the Roadshow reached more than 50 cities around the world. We shared highlights of the latest and greatest Mozilla and Firefox technologies. Now, we’re back to tell the story of how the web continues to democratize opportunities for developers and digital creators.

  • Mozilla Localization (L10N): Implementing Fluent in a localization tool

    In order to produce natural sounding translations, Fluent syntax supports gender, plurals, conjugations, and virtually any other grammatical category. The syntax is designed to be simple to read, but translators without developer background might find more complex concepts harder to deal with.

    That’s why we designed a Fluent-specific user interface in Pontoon, which unleashes Fluent powers to localizers who aren’t coders. Any other general purpose Translation Management System (TMS) with support for popular localization formats can follow the example. Let’s have a closer look at Fluent implementation in Pontoon.

  • It is your moral obligation to use Firefox

    While both Google Chrome and Microsoft Edge themselves are proprietary products they are based on the open source Chromium project utilizing Blink and V8 engines. This means that in practice the entire browser market is currently based on free and open solutions. This is obviously a wonderful thing and Google Chrome itself appears to be a good and nice to use product. Unfortunately as always the world is not as beautiful as we would like it to be.

    As the Chromium project is largely financed by Google and used by Chrome, the most popular browser in the world, Google exerts a significant political pressure over the project and de facto controls it. This control can at this point effectively be used in order to shape the web and push it in the desired direction.

  • Mozilla Future Releases Blog: Firefox Beta for Windows 10 on Qualcomm Snapdragon Always Connected PCs Now Available

Mozilla: Rust, Privacy, and Ad-Blocking

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Fluxbox
  • This Week in Rust 213

    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.

  • Firefox 57 delays requests to tracking domains

    Firefox Quantum – version 57 – introduced number of changes to the network requests scheduler. One of them is using data of the Tracking Protection database to delay load of scripts from tracking domains when possible during the time a page is actively loading and rendering – I call it tailing.

    This has a positive effect on page load performance as we save some of the network bandwidth, I/O and CPU for loading and processing of images and scripts running on the site so the web page is complete and ready sooner.

  • Taking a break from Adblock Plus development

    After twelve years of working on Adblock Plus, the time seems right for me to take a break. The project’s dependence on me has been on the decline for quite a while already. Six years ago we founded eyeo, a company that would put the former hobby project on a more solid foundation. Two years ago Felix Dahlke took over the CTO role from me. And a little more than a month ago we launched the new Adblock Plus 3.0 for Firefox based on the Web Extensions framework. As damaging as this move inevitably was for our extension’s quality and reputation, it had a positive side effect: our original Adblock Plus for Firefox codebase is now legacy code, not to be worked on. Consequently, my Firefox expertise is barely required any more; this was one of the last areas where replacing me would have been problematic.

  • Don Marti: quick question on tracking protection

    One quick question for anyone who still isn't convinced that tracking protection needs to be a high priority for web browsers in 2018. Web tracking isn't just about items from your online shopping cart following you to other sites. Users who are vulnerable to abusive practices for health or other reasons have tracking protection needs too.

AntiX Linux: A Brief Review

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Fluxbox
Reviews

Certain factors like systemd are polarizing the Linux community. It seems that either you like it or you hate it. Some of the Debian developers are getting nervous and so a fork of Debian called Devuan has been announced.

I'm always looking at other distros that emphasize compactness and the ability to run on old hardware. I was also intrigued by the Debian controversy with systemd so when I saw AntiX 13.2 was based on Debian Wheezy I had to give it a try. AntiX comes on a single CD so installing it was easy enough.

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Fluxbox 1.3.7 Released With Few Changes

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Fluxbox

Fluxbox 1.3.6 was released last month after this lightweight window manager went two years without a new release. It looks like the rate of development of Fluxbox is ticking back up as Fluxbox 1.3.7 was just tagged this morning.

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Wayland & Weston 1.5 Officially Released

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Fluxbox

Wayland 1.5 features a new internal event queue for Wayland display events, which allows for the client library to dispatch delete and error events immediately. On the build front, Wayland now uses non-recursive Makefiles.

As usual, the Weston compositor changes tend to be more interesting these days and includes more work on XDG-Shell, the Weston input stack is now split out into libinput, there's support for the new XWayland Server to be found in this summer's release of X.Org Server 1.16, the full-screen shell was added, an animate window closing event, support for different color depths on different outputs, and other changes.

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Trimming the fat with Fluxbox

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Fluxbox

omgsuse.com: One of the oft touted reasons to use openSUSE is the stellar support and packaging for a wide-variety of desktop environments. While the amount attention focused on the "big four" is certainly the lion's share, there is still a lot of attention paid towards less popular window managers and desktop environments like Enlightenment, Openbox, Window Maker or Fluxbox.

What is Your Favorite Desktop?

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KDE
Fluxbox
Software

ostatic.com: Every few years I run a poll on my personal Website to gauge Linux users' favorite desktop. When analyzing the results over the years, some trends do emerge. Is KDE or GNOME king? What has come in third or fourth consistently over the years? How about you, what is your favorite desktop?

Fluxbox 1.3 Released | What’s new | Compile

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Fluxbox
HowTos

linuxnov.com: Fluxbox is a great lightweight X window manager that does not require a high machine performance to use it. Been a long time since last Fluxbox stable release from two years, finally Fluxbox 1.3 has been released today with quite a few new features.

Flexible for a Fluxbox? – Lightweight X Window Manager

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Fluxbox
HowTos

thegeekstuff.com: One of the many great things about using UNIX or a UNIX-like operating system is the ability to tailor your environment to your liking. If you want something less resource intensive that offers a greater degree of control then Fluxbox Window Manager is what you’re looking for.

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora Community Updates From Red Hat

  • Fedora program update: 2020-43

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora this week. Fedora 33 will be released on Tuesday! I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • Fedora status updates: September 2020

    Welcome to the newly-revitalized monthly set of updates on key areas within Fedora. This update includes Fedora Council representatives, Fedora Editions, and Fedora Objectives. The content here is based on the regular updates submitted to the Fedora Council, published to the project dashboard.

  • Fedora program update: 2020-42 – Fedora Community Blog

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora this week. Final freeze is underway. Please update the Release Readiness page with your team’s status. The Go/No-Go meeting is Thursday. I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • Fedora Community Blog monthly summary: September 2020

    In September, we published 18 posts. The site had 3,176 visits from 2,022 unique viewers. Readers wrote no comments. 13 visits came from Fedora Planet, while 872 came from search engines, and 199 came from the WordPress Android App.

  • GitLab AMA follow-up – Fedora Community Blog

    Last month, we invited folks from GitLab to a public Ask Me Anything (AMA) session. We collected questions from the community in advance about the upcoming Fedora migration to GitLab. The Community Platform Engineering (CPE) team has been working with GitLab for the past few months on understanding and troubleshooting the technical challenges associated with the migration. This AMA was a natural next step to enable the community to participate and give the Fedora community a chance to get to know some of the GitLab team members who are supporting the migration process. During the AMA session, Nuritzi Sanchez, Lindsay Olson, Jason Young, André Luís, Greg Myers, Michelle Gill, Daniel Gruesso, and Nick Thomas from GitLab sat down on IRC with the Fedora and CentOS communities to answer questions live.

  • Crashing saltstack minions on f33?

    It’s a _scope_id bug affecting Salt on Python 3.9. There’s a patch submitted upstream, and 3002+this patch is headed to updates-testing.

  • The Python Maintenance team is hiring

    The Python Maintenance team at Red Hat is looking for a software engineer to join us and help us maintain Python in Fedora and RHEL. Hey, Pythonistas. We’re looking for a software engineer to join us in the Python Maintenance team at Red Hat – our remote-friendly Brno-based team with members throughout the Czech Republic (including Prague and Ostrava) as well as abroad (France, partially Greece, US planned).

Android Leftovers

Review: Peppermint OS 10

Peppermint is one of those delightful distributions which does what it says it will do. It sets out to be lightweight, easy to set up, and offer native-like access to web applications. It does all of these things and does them well. I also happen to really like the well-organized settings panel and the friendly software manager. I especially like how mintInstall makes it clear when it is working with Deb or Flatpak packages. While I'm not personally a fan of web applications, I do think Peppermint deserves full credit for making them as easy to use as possible and as native-like as it does. I may never like running my applications over the web, but for people who do like this approach, Peppermint's Ice and SSB features are excellent. Mostly though I'm a big fan of the distribution's combined LXDE/Xfce desktop. It is a mixture of components which works nicely, is fairly easy to configure, and it offers some of the best performance I have had with an open source desktop this year. There are some rough edges. The system installer threw out some errors towards the end of the setup process. Needing to logout and back in to see Flatpaks in the application menu was a pain, but not a deal breaker. On the whole I think Peppermint does a good job of feeling modern while offering good performance and easy to use tools. Read more

Linux 5.10-rc1

Two weeks have passed, and the merge window is over. I've tagged and
pushed out 5.10-rc1, and everything looks fairly normal.

This looks to be a bigger release than I expected, and while the merge
window is smaller than the one for 5.8 was, it's not a *lot* smaller.
And 5.8 was our biggest release ever.

I'm not entirely sure whether this is just a general upward trend (we
did seem to plateau for a while there), or just a fluke, or perhaps
due to 5.9 dragging out an extra week. We will see, I guess.

That said, things seem to have gone fairly smoothly. I don't see any
huge red flags, and the merge window didn't cause any unusual issues
for me. Famous last words..

The most interesting - to me - change here is Christoph's setf_fs()
removal (it got merged through Al Viro, as you can see in my mergelog
below).  It's not a _huge_ change, but it's interesting because the
whole model of set_fs() to specify whether a userspace copy actually
goes to user space or kernel space goes back to pretty much the
original release of Linux, and while the name is entirely historic (it
hasn't used the %fs segment register in a long time), the concept has
remained. Until now.

We still do have "set_fs()" around, and not every architecture has
been converted to the new world order, but x86, powerpc, s390 and
RISC-V have had the address space overrides removed, and all the core
work is done. Other architectures will hopefully get converted away
from that very historic model too, but it might take a while to get
rid of it all.

Anyway, to most people that all shouldn't matter at all, and it's
mainly a small historical footnote that 5.10 no longer relies on the
whole set_fs() model. Most of the actual changes are - as usual -
driver updates, but there are changes all over. I think the merge log
below gives some kind of flavor of what's been going on on a high
level, but if you're interested in the details go look at the git
tree. As mentioned, it's a big merge window, with  almost 14k commits
(*) by closer to 1700 people.

Please go test,

                  Linus

(*) closer to 15k commits if you count merges.
Read more Also: Linux 5.10-rc1 Released With New Hardware Support, Security Additions