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Fluxbox

AntiX Linux: A Brief Review

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Fluxbox
Reviews

Certain factors like systemd are polarizing the Linux community. It seems that either you like it or you hate it. Some of the Debian developers are getting nervous and so a fork of Debian called Devuan has been announced.

I'm always looking at other distros that emphasize compactness and the ability to run on old hardware. I was also intrigued by the Debian controversy with systemd so when I saw AntiX 13.2 was based on Debian Wheezy I had to give it a try. AntiX comes on a single CD so installing it was easy enough.

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Fluxbox 1.3.7 Released With Few Changes

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Fluxbox

Fluxbox 1.3.6 was released last month after this lightweight window manager went two years without a new release. It looks like the rate of development of Fluxbox is ticking back up as Fluxbox 1.3.7 was just tagged this morning.

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Wayland & Weston 1.5 Officially Released

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Fluxbox

Wayland 1.5 features a new internal event queue for Wayland display events, which allows for the client library to dispatch delete and error events immediately. On the build front, Wayland now uses non-recursive Makefiles.

As usual, the Weston compositor changes tend to be more interesting these days and includes more work on XDG-Shell, the Weston input stack is now split out into libinput, there's support for the new XWayland Server to be found in this summer's release of X.Org Server 1.16, the full-screen shell was added, an animate window closing event, support for different color depths on different outputs, and other changes.

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Trimming the fat with Fluxbox

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Fluxbox

omgsuse.com: One of the oft touted reasons to use openSUSE is the stellar support and packaging for a wide-variety of desktop environments. While the amount attention focused on the "big four" is certainly the lion's share, there is still a lot of attention paid towards less popular window managers and desktop environments like Enlightenment, Openbox, Window Maker or Fluxbox.

What is Your Favorite Desktop?

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KDE
Fluxbox
Software

ostatic.com: Every few years I run a poll on my personal Website to gauge Linux users' favorite desktop. When analyzing the results over the years, some trends do emerge. Is KDE or GNOME king? What has come in third or fourth consistently over the years? How about you, what is your favorite desktop?

Fluxbox 1.3 Released | What’s new | Compile

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Fluxbox
HowTos

linuxnov.com: Fluxbox is a great lightweight X window manager that does not require a high machine performance to use it. Been a long time since last Fluxbox stable release from two years, finally Fluxbox 1.3 has been released today with quite a few new features.

Flexible for a Fluxbox? – Lightweight X Window Manager

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Fluxbox
HowTos

thegeekstuff.com: One of the many great things about using UNIX or a UNIX-like operating system is the ability to tailor your environment to your liking. If you want something less resource intensive that offers a greater degree of control then Fluxbox Window Manager is what you’re looking for.

Linux Mint Fluxbox CE, resurrected

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Linux
Fluxbox

linuxmint.com: The Fluxbox Community Edition produced releases for Linux Mint 5 “Elyssa” and Linux Mint 6 “Felicia” and it became quite popular among Linux Mint users. During the release cycle for Linux Mint 7 “Gloria”, no Fluxbox edition was released.

Fluxbox In-Depth: Mad Customization And Other Tips

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Fluxbox

linuxcritic.wordpress: When I was first preparing to switch to Linux many years ago, I went into research mode and looked around the net a bit. At the time, part of the allure of Linux were the crazy cool desktops people had. I discovered that all those amazing desktops were the result of Fluxbox.

Two weeks, still loving Fluxbox

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Fluxbox

berenguel.blogspot: Two and a half weeks ago, I got a netbook and promptly installed Ubuntu, followed by Fluxbox. And after two weeks of almost continued use, I like it even more than when I decided to use it. Some of the points I really enjoy:

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More in Tux Machines

Raspberry Pi based computer offers Real-Time Ethernet

Hilscher is prepping a rugged “netPI” computer that combines a Raspberry Pi 3 with its “netHAT 52-RTE” RPi add-on featuring dual Real-Time Ethernet ports. German Real-Time Ethernet experts Hilscher will soon launch a Raspberry Pi 3-based industrial computer with Real-Time Ethernet support. Hilscher has yet to formally announce the ruggedized netPI computer, but the board was demonstrated at the recent Embedded World show, and was revealed in a Mar. 27 Element14 Community blog by Shabaz. The system can be used as a Real-Time Ethernet gateway or controller, and it supports add-ons such as sensors or actuators to enable additional applications, writes Shabaz. Read more

GNOME Migration and Slideshow

  • The Linux Migration: Corporate Collaboration, Part 2
    Note that a number of folks have suggested alternative calendar applications. I’ve rejected these so far because I don’t think they’ll fit into my workflow or my environment, but they may work for others. Some of the applications I’ve seen suggested include Rainlendar, Calcurse, or KOrganizer. Some of these applications address some of the shortcomings of GNOME Calendar, but none of them address all the major issues I’ve outlined here (based on my testing thus far).
  • GNOME 3.24 Provides Users With More Pleasing Linux Desktop Experience

Dowry to Linux Foundation From NSA Ally

  • AT&T takes up membership in the Linux Foundation, furthers open source efforts
    AT&T has become a Platinum member in the Linux Foundation, a move that reflects the telco’s ongoing effort to implement open source and open networks not only in its own networks but also to drive broader industry collaboration. One example of this is AT&T's Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy (ECOMP) architecture. In February, AT&T contributed several million lines of ECOMP code to The Linux Foundation, as well as the new Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project based on production-ready code from AT&T and OPEN-O contributors.
  • AT&T Joins The Linux Foundation as a Platinum Member
  • AT&T Joins The Linux Foundation as a Platinum Member
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit advancing professional open source management for mass collaboration, today announced that AT&T has become a Platinum member. This follows news of the company’s contribution of several million lines of ECOMP code to The Linux Foundation, as well as the new Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project based on production-ready code from AT&T and OPEN-O contributors.

GNU/Linux on Servers: VisionMobile Report, Cilium, Microservices, and Kubernetes

  • VisionMobile Report Lays Out Developer Salaries by Skill, Software Sector, and Location
    In 2017, that means skilled cloud and backend developers, as well as those who work in emerging technologies including Internet of Things (IoT), machine learning and augmented/virtual reality (AR/VR) can make more money -- tens or sometimes hundreds of times more -- than frontend web and mobile developers whose skills have become more commoditized. “In Western Europe, for example, the median backend developer earns 12% more than the median web developer; a machine learning developer makes 28% more,” according to the report.
  • Cilium leverages Linux kernel for advanced container networking
    Networking has always been one of the most persistent headaches when working with containers. Even Kubernetes—fast becoming the technology of choice for container orchestration—has limitations in how it implements networking. Tricky stuff like network security is, well, even trickier. Now an open source project named Cilium, which is partly sponsored by Google, is attempting to provide a new networking methodology for containers based on technology used in the Linux kernel. Its goal is to give containers better network security and a simpler model for networking.
  • Modules vs. microservices
    Much has been said about moving from monoliths to microservices. Besides rolling off the tongue nicely, it also seems like a no-brainer to chop up a monolith into microservices. But is this approach really the best choice for your organization? It’s true that there are many drawbacks to maintaining a messy monolithic application. But there is a compelling alternative which is often overlooked: modular application development. In this article, we'll explore what this alternative entails and show how it relates to building microservices.
  • What Is Kubernetes?
    Kubernetes is open source software for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications. The project is governed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, which is hosted by The Linux Foundation. And it’s quickly becoming the Linux of the cloud, says Jim Zemlin, executive director of The Linux Foundation. Running a container on a laptop is relatively simple. But connecting containers across multiple hosts, scaling them when needed, deploying applications without downtime, and service discovery among several aspects, are really hard challenges. Kubernetes addresses those challenges with a set of primitives and a powerful API.