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MDV

The first step towards Mageia 8 – Alpha 1 is available for testing

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MDV

We are happy to announce the release of the test images of Mageia 8. These are available to early testers to help with the development towards a stable final release of Mageia 8. There have been large scale updates of all packages as well as new features implemented to improve what Mageia already offered.

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Also: Mageia 8 Enters Development with Linux Kernel 5.7, Improved ARM Support

Mageia 8 Alpha 1 Released With Better ARM Support, Linux 5.7 Kernel

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MDV

Mageia 8 Alpha 1 is out this morning as the newest version of this Linux distribution that originates from the once legendary Mandrake Linux.

Mageia 8 has been working on better ARM support, they have nearly wrapped up their Python 2 removal effort, RPM package metadata is now compressed with Zstd rather than XZ for faster processing, the Linux 5.7 kernel is powering the distro, various packaging improvements, Mageia Control Center enhancements, and a newer KDE Plasma stack for the default desktop experience.

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OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 2020.05 snapshot

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MDV

OMLx ’Rock’ (currently 4.1) is for users who want a stable system.

Please note that Rock system will receive only bug fixes and security updates.

The user wishing for the latest and brightest without having to wait for a new release may want to install ’Rolling’ instead, our new release branch which we are going to officially announce very soon.

By default, only /main repository is enabled in OpenMandriva releases. If you want to find out all the packages available please use Software Repository Selector (om-repo-picker) and enable additional repositories. Guide here.

From time to time we make available Rock snapshots that include fixes for bugs reported after release, and/or important new improvements.

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[Mageia] Chronicle in May

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MDV

It’s been a very long time since you’ve heard from us on this blog. Now it’s time to give you some fresh news, because no matter what it seems, a lot of work has been done since then.

Organization

Many teams — the dev and QA teams in particular — are now working on a schedule for the upcoming Mageia 8. It is now available online. It seems this summer is going to be all about testing our new release!

You can already take part in the testing and check if all of our Drak tools are functioning properly, and help the QA team. The coming months should allow us to report any new bugs or update existing reports in our Bugzilla. If you are comfortable working with Perl, your coding skills will be much appreciated to help correcting all the known bugs in our Drak tools.

[...]

A security alert has been published concerning our current version of LibreOffice, which is also EOL at the end of the month… Therefore, LibreOffice’s latest version 6.4.4 has been built and is currently being thoroughly tested.

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Latest Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts

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Development
GNU
Linux
MDV
  • PDL: Episode VI - a New Book

    I would love a new PDL Book. One that's completely different from the original to maximize the surface of engagement to a new audience. As a "sequel", It would have the advantage of being able to refer the reader to the first book for longer explanations and be able to jump right into how to solve significant problems. brian d foy has just finished his Mojolicious book, so I bet he's got loads of free time on his hands. (although I remember him in the middle of writing it in 2018, so you may have to wait a bit)

    The premise behind the PDL Book is that it takes you on a tour of the features, trying to expose the useful parts as quickly as possible and yet still give you the Full Monty. In today's world, many coders, including yours truly, are unwilling adherents of SOOP (Stack Overflow Oriented Programming) with the attention span of 5-year olds who want to dive into the middle of a book and work their way backwards trying to understand the solution. I think it's an issue of motivation and, honestly, I'm surprised you've read this far before going off and checking your phone. Smile

  • 2020-02-07 | Linux Headlines

    Bruce Perens prevails in court, a patent troll takes aim at Mycroft, Docker announces the removal of its legacy repositories, GitHub opens the beta for its Actions service API, and the FSF and GNU project release a joint statement regarding their future relationship.

  • Multipath Musings | TechSNAP 422

    We take a look at a few exciting features coming to Linux kernel 5.6, including the first steps to multipath TCP.

    Plus the latest Intel speculative execution vulnerability, and Microsoft's troubled history with certificate renewal.

  • AWS Christophe Limpalair | Jupiter Extras 53

    Christophe joins Ell to discuss how to get started learning AWS and which materials you will need for that nerve-wracking interview.

  • 2020-02-06 | Linux Headlines

    CoreOS Container Linux prepares to say goodbye, OpenJDK and Kotlin see some big gains, and some long-awaited changes coming soon to Firefox.

  • Installing and Reinstalling Linux on the Pinebook Pro

    The process for installing a Linux distribution on the Pinebook Pro is not the same as other Linux laptops, it's a bit more involved. In this video, I show off the process and give you an overview of how this works.

  • OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 overview | The best! ...until OpenMandriva does better

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Solus 4.1 and some of the applications pre-installed.

And OpenMandriva did better: OMLx 4.1 final release is out now!

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MDV

OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 turned out to be a great one but... we made it better.
Few days after the Release Candidate we are very proud to introduce you OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 final release.

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OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 RC is out

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MDV

OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 is just around the corner. The team is publishing today the last milestone for current release cycle.

OMLx 4.1 RC release is mostly bug fixing and update packages.

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OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 Beta available for testing

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MDV

OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 Beta is available for download and testing.
Beta milestone is closer to final release, although still in need of more testing and fine-tuning.

Therefore the developers will be glad to read your feedback and bug reports at our forum or at our bug tracking system.

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Also: OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 Beta Adds Clang-Built Kernel Option, Experimental Zypper

OpenMandriva Is The Latest Linux Distribution Using Zstd To Compress Packages

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MDV

Similar to Fedora's move last year to compress RPMs with Zstd rather than XZ for much faster decompression speeds and a better compression ratio at the highest level, OpenMandriva has now enacted a similar change.

This OpenMandriva change also comes just days after Arch Linux switched to Zstd for a ~1300% speedup in total decompression time, among other Linux distributions as well switching to Zstandard for either offering a comparable compression ratio to existing algorithms or better, depending upon the compression level utilized. But the big win in switching the packaging to Zstd compression is the significantly faster decompression times.

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PCLinuxOS/Mageia: Mageia 6 End of Life and PCLinuxOS Screenshots, Interview

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MDV
  • Mageia 6 End of Life – Time to Upgrade

    As you know, Mageia 7 was released this summer, followed shortly after by Mageia 7.1. It is time to say goodbye to Mageia 6 – updates have stopped, including security updates.
    As usual, before the upgrade, do a backup of your data and documents.

  • [PCLinuxOS] Screenshot Showcase
  • PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: Revoluz

    Why and when did you start using Linux?
    2006 Open-Suse, 6 Months later PCLinuxOS my only distro.

    What specific equipment do currently use with PCLinuxOS?
    Office, Graphics, Multimedia - Jack-Audio, HTML Website build and not so often anymore, 3D CAM

    Do you feel that your use of Linux influences the reactions you receive from your computer peers or family? If so, how?
    Trying to make people curious by talking about it.

    What would you like to see happen within PCLinuxOS that would make it a better place. What are your feelings?
    That Mini Live CD correspond to the Sinn Mini, only for the wide hardware compatibility and peripherals such as printers and scanners.

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More in Tux Machines

SolydXK 10.4 Distro Released, Based on Debian GNU/Linux 10.4 “Buster”

As its version number suggests, SolydXK 10.4 is based on Debian GNU/Linux 10.4, which was released in early May 2020 with more than 50 security updates and over 100 bug fixes. The SolydXK team has worked hard over the past several months to bring you SolydXK 10.4, which includes the latest Linux 4.19 kernel and up-to-date packages from the Debian Buster repositories. On top of that, the new release comes with some important under-the-hood changes. For example, the /usr directories have been merged and the /bin, /sbin and /lib directories have now become symbolic links to /usr/bin, /usr/sbin and /usr/lib. Read more

Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

  • Upcoming SAVVY-V Open Source RISC-V Cluster Board Supports 10GbE via Microsemi PolarFire 64-bit RISC-V SoC

    RISC-V based PolarFire SoC FPGA by Microsemi may be coming up in the third quarter of this year, but Ali Uzel has been sharing a few details about SAVVY-V advanced open-source RISC-V cluster board made by FOSOH-V (Flexible Open SOurce Hardware for RISC-V) community of developers. It’s powered by Microsemi Polarfire RISC-V SoC MPFS250T with four 64-bit RISC-V cores, a smaller RV64IMAC monitor core, and FPGA fabric that allows 10GbE via SFP+ cages, and exposes six USB Type-C ports. The solution is called a cluster board since up to six SAVVY-V boards can be stacked via a PC/104+ connector and interfaced via the USB-C ports.

  • Some PSAs for NUC owners

    I’ve written before, in Contemplating the Cute Brick, that I’m a big fan of Intel’s NUC line of small-form-factor computers. Over the last week I’ve been having some unpleasant learning experiences around them. I’m still a fan, but I’m shipping this post where the search engines can see it in support of future NUC owners in trouble. Two years ago I bought an NUC for my wife Cathy to replace her last tower-case PC – the NUC8i3BEH1. This model was semi-obsolete even then, but I didn’t want one of the newer i5 or i7 NUCs because I didn’t think it would fit my wife’s needs as well. What my wife does with her computer doesn’t tax it much. Web browsing, office work, a bit of gaming that does not extend to recent AAA titles demanding the latest whizzy graphics card. I thought her needs would be best served by a small, quiet, low-power-consumption machine that was cheap enough to be considered readily disposable at the end of its service life. The exact opposite of my Great Beast… The NUC was an experiment that made Cathy and me happy. She especially likes the fact that it’s small and light enough to be mounted on the back of her monitor, so it effectively takes up no desk space or floor area in her rather crowded office. I like the NUC’s industrial design and engineering – lots of nice little details like the four case screws being captive to the baseplate so you cannot lose them during disassembly. Also. Dammit, NUCs are pretty. I say dammit because I feel like this shouldn’t matter to me and am a bit embarrassed to discover that it does. I like the color and shape and feel of these devices. Someone did an amazing job of making them unobtrusively attractive. [...] When I asked if Simply NUC knew of a source for a fan that would fit my 8i3BEH1 – a reasonable question, I think, to ask a company that loudly claims to be a one-stop shop for all NUC needs – the reply email told me I’d have to do “personal research” on that. It turns out that if the useless drone who was Simply NUC “service” had cared about doing his actual job, he could have the read the fan’s model number off the image I had sent him into a search box and found multiple sources within seconds, because that’s what I then did. Of course this would have required caring that a customer was unhappy, which apparently they don’t do at Simply NUC. Third reason I know this: My request for a refund didn’t even get refused; it wasn’t even answered.

  • GNU Binutils 2.35 Preparing For Release

    Binutils 2.35 was branched this weekend as this important component to the open-source Linux ecosystem. Binutils 2.35 has been branched meaning feature development is over for this next version of this collection of GNU tools. GNU Binutils 2.356 drops x86 Native Client (NaCl) support with Google having deprecated it in favor of WebAssembly, new options added for the readelf tool, many bug fixes, and an assortment of other changes albeit mostly on the minor side.

  • Using CPU Subsets for Building Software

    NetBSD has a somewhat obscure tool named psrset that allows creating “sets” of cores and running tasks on one of those sets. Let’s try it: [...]

  • What a TLS self signed certificate is at a mechanical level

    To simplify a lot, a TLS certificate is a bundle of attributes wrapped around a public key. All TLS certificates are signed by someone; we call this the issuer. The issuer for a certificate is identified by their X.509 Subject Name, and also at least implicitly by the keypair used to sign the certificate (since only an issuer TLS certificate with the right public key can validate the signature).

  • Security Researchers Attacked Google’s Mysterious Fuchsia OS: Here’s What They Found

    A couple of things that Computer Business Review has widely covered are important context for the security probe. (These won’t be much surprise to Fuchsia’s followers of the past two years.)

    i.e. Fuschsia OS is based on a tiny custom kernel from Google called Zircon which has some elements written in C++, some in Rust. Device drivers run in what’s called “user mode” or “user land”, meaning they’re not given fully elevated privileges. This means they can be isolated better.

    In user land, everything that a driver does has to go via the kernel first before hitting the actually computer’s resources. As Quark Labs found, this is a tidy way of reducing attack surface. But with some sustained attention, its researchers managed to get what they wanted: “We are able to gain kernel code execution from a regular userland process.”

  • What have you been playing on Linux? Come and have a chat

    Ah Sunday, that special day that's a calm before the storm of another week and a time for a community chat here on GOL. Today, it's our birthday! If you didn't see the post earlier this week, GamingOnLinux as of today has hit the big 11 years old! Oh how time sure flies by. Onto the subject of gaming on Linux: honestly, the majority of my personal game time has been taken up by Into the Breach. It's so gorgeously streamlined, accessible, fun and it's also ridiculously complex at the same time. Tiny maps that require a huge amount of forward thinking, as you weigh up each movement decision against any possible downsides. It's like playing chess, only with big mecha fighting off aliens trying to take down buildings. [...] I've also been quite disappointed in Crayta on Stadia, as it so far hasn't lived up to even my smallest expectations for the game maker. It just seems so half-baked, with poor/stiff animations and a lack of any meaningful content to start with. I'll be checking back on it in a few months but for now it's just not fun.

Programming Leftovers (LLVM Clang, R, Perl and Python)

  • Arm Cortex-A77 Support Upstreamed Finally To LLVM Clang 11

    While the Arm Cortex-A77 was announced last year and already has been succeeded by the Cortex-A78 announcement, support for the A77 has finally been upstreamed to the LLVM Clang compiler. The Cortex-A77 support was added to the GCC compiler last year while seemingly as an oversight the A77 support wasn't added to LLVM/Clang until this week.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: Rcpp now used by 2000 CRAN packages–and one in eight!

    As of yesterday, Rcpp stands at exactly 2000 reverse-dependencies on CRAN. The graph on the left depicts the growth of Rcpp usage (as measured by Depends, Imports and LinkingTo, but excluding Suggests) over time. Rcpp was first released in November 2008. It probably cleared 50 packages around three years later in December 2011, 100 packages in January 2013, 200 packages in April 2014, and 300 packages in November 2014. It passed 400 packages in June 2015 (when I tweeted about it), 500 packages in late October 2015, 600 packages in March 2016, 700 packages last July 2016, 800 packages last October 2016, 900 packages early January 2017, 1000 packages in April 2017, 1250 packages in November 2017, 1500 packages in November 2018 and then 1750 packages last August. The chart extends to the very beginning via manually compiled data from CRANberries and checked with crandb. The next part uses manually saved entries. The core (and by far largest) part of the data set was generated semi-automatically via a short script appending updates to a small file-based backend. A list of packages using Rcpp is available too.

  • YouTube: The [Perl] Weekly Challenge - 067
  • The [Perl] Weekly Challenge #067

    This week both tasks had one thing in common i.e. pairing two or more list. In the past, I have taken the help from CPAN module Algorithm::Combinatorics for such tasks.

  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxxxiv) stackoverflow python report
  • Flask project setup: TDD, Docker, Postgres and more - Part 1

    There are tons of tutorials on Internet that tech you how to use a web framework and how to create Web applications, and many of these cover Flask, first of all the impressive Flask Mega-Tutorial by Miguel Grinberg (thanks Miguel!). Why another tutorial, then? Recently I started working on a small personal project and decided that it was a good chance to refresh my knowledge of the framework. For this reason I temporarily dropped the clean architecture I often recommend, and started from scratch following some tutorials. My development environment quickly became very messy, and after a while I realised I was very unsatisfied by the global setup. So, I decided to start from scratch again, this time writing down some requirements I want from my development setup. I also know very well how complicated the deploy of an application in production can be, so I want my setup to be "deploy-friendly" as much as possible. Having seen too many project suffer from legacy setups, and knowing that many times such issues can be avoided with a minimum amount of planning, I thought this might be interesting for other developers as well. I consider this setup by no means better than others, it simply addresses different concerns.