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Mandriva Linux 2009 Alpha 1: no public release

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mandrivaclub.com: Those of you who saw the recent announcement of the Mandriva Linux 2009 release schedule may be wondering about the status of Alpha 1, which was scheduled for public release on June 25th. Due to some major problems we have decided not to make a public release of Alpha 1.

Battle of the Titans - Mandriva vs openSUSE: The Rematch

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SUSE
-s

Last fall when the two mega-distros openSUSE and Mandriva both hit the mirrors, it was difficult to decide which I liked better. In an attempt to narrow it down, I ran some light-hearted tests and found Mandriva won out in a side-by-side comparison. But things change rapidly in the Linux world and I wondered how a competition of the newest releases would come out. Mandriva 2008.1 was released this past April and openSUSE 11.0 was released just last week.

Looking for a nice KDE distribution? Try Mandriva 2008 Spring

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siberian.ws: My old laptop Acer Aspire 1705SMi with Pentium 4 3GHz and 1 GB RAM started to show its age. Windows XP did not run on it exceptionally well, so I decided to install Linux on it too.

Mandriva's Linux on a stick will wow all the ladies this Summer

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theregister.co.uk: Mandriva Linux recently announced the Mandriva Flash 2008 Spring operating system, the latest version of its Linux-on-a-USB-stick distro. The Flash sticks come with a complete, bootable version of Mandriva Linux and make it dead simple to take your Linux with you wherever you go - a huge help when you're trying to impress the babes at the beach.

Mandriva Linux 2009 plans announced

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mandriva.com: Mandriva Linux 2009 comes a step closer to reality today with the unveiling of the release schedule and the technical specifications. The schedule includes two alphas, two betas, and two release candidates, prior to the final release in early October 2008. The first alpha release is scheduled for June 25th - just a week away.

Mandriva Linux One Spring 2008 Review

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ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: This month’s Linux Format Magazine had Mandriva on it and it could run as a LiveCD, so I’m doing this review within the LiveCD. The first thing that pops up (from Mandriva - as opposed to from LxF’s formatting of the disc) is a language dialog box.

Mandriva Flash 2008 Spring released

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Mandriva today announces the release of Mandriva Flash 2008 Spring, the new release of its popular bootable distribution on a USB key. This new version uses the new Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring as its base, doubles the key's capacity to 8GB, introduces a new installer which allows you to install Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring to the system's hard disk, and comes in an attractive new white color scheme.

Some Cooker news as of 2008-06-08

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linux-wizard.net: Ok, here are some quick news from Cooker :

Celebrating 10 years of Mandriva

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2008 marks the tenth anniversary of Mandriva - the company and the distribution. The Mandriva community celebrated in style over the last weekend in May, with a party in the Eiffel Tower in Paris attended by many staff, former staff, community members and partners. There was also an - indoor - picnic, and the now-traditional Dance Dance Revolution party.

Review: Mandriva One Spring 2008 LiveCD

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muddygeek.wordpress: I’ve been sampling GNU/Linux distros for years now. I’ve played with Red Hat and the old SuSE. And I think Mandriva One Spring 2008 is a joke. Its realistically performs no better than those old distros.

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