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Mandriva: 100/100 on Acid3

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MDV

happyassassin.net: So, thanks to the fine work of the WebKit team - particularly the GTK+ port - Mandriva can now achieve 100/100 on the Acid3 web standards compliance test.

The Perfect Desktop - Mandriva One 2008 Spring With KDE

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MDV
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up a Mandriva One 2008 Spring (Mandriva 2008.1) desktop (with the KDE desktop environment) that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop.

Mandriva on a Low cost notebook : Kira

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Hardware
MDV

linux-wizard.net: Many people are talking about the Asus Eee PC : low cost, tiny, and for the "geeks", running Linux. Mandriva 2008 Spring is compatible out of the box with Asus Eee PC. However a new low cost PC is appearing, done by a spanish company : AIRIS KIRA.

mandriva installation on acer 5050 laptop

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MDV

bearrider.wordpress: Kubuntu left a lot to be desired on my machine so I looked around for another good KDE distro and found Mandriva!

Mandriva Spring 2008.1

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MDV

lazytechguy.com: Mandriva has just released their 2008.1 spring edition. This release promises a lot. Mandriva has really tried hard to make this release an extremely user friendly one. I tried the Mandriva One KDE edition and am very impressed with it.

Mandriva 2008.1 Spring: Close but no Cigar

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MDV

techiemoe.com: Mandriva (when it was called Mandrake) was one of my first exposures to Linux. It was solid, it was pretty, and it made Linux feel welcoming and fun. If one thing can be said is the distribution has remained consistently pleasant to look at.

The Perfect Desktop - Mandriva One 2008 Spring (Gnome)

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MDV
HowTos

This document describes step by step how to set up a Mandriva One 2008 Spring (Mandriva 2008.1) desktop (GNOME).

Mandriva One 2008.1 and old laptop: alas ....

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MDV

seputarlinux.blogspot: Several months ago, I had a chance to try running the live cd version of Mandriva One (version 2008) on my old laptop. At that time I was very impressed, it was beautiful, very user-friendly and everything just worked flawlessly. So when Mandriva One 2008.1 Spring was out several days ago, I was very excited.

Review: Mandriva 2008 Spring

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MDV

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: UNLIKE the Scottish weather, I’ve warmed a lot toward Mandriva in recent months. The thaw in relations began when I reviewed Mandriva’s excellent 2008 Flash distribution (read it here) and has continued with their just-released desktop offering, Mandriva 2008 Spring.

Mandriva Tailors Linux For Budget PC Market

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MDV

informationweek.com: Mandriva last week released the latest version of its distribution of the open source Linux operating system -- and it's hoping some new features will catch the eye of mainstream computer users weaned on Microsoft Windows. The 2008 Spring distribution includes Elisa multimedia center with drag-and-drop tools for storing and managing digital content such as photos, music, and videos.

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today's leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Security Leftovers

  • Chrome vulnerability lets attackers steal movies from streaming services
    A significant security vulnerability in Google technology that is supposed to protect videos streamed via Google Chrome has been discovered by researchers from the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Cyber Security Research Center (CSRC) in collaboration with a security researcher from Telekom Innovation Laboratories in Berlin, Germany.
  • Large botnet of CCTV devices knock the snot out of jewelry website
    Researchers have encountered a denial-of-service botnet that's made up of more than 25,000 Internet-connected closed circuit TV devices. The researchers with Security firm Sucuri came across the malicious network while defending a small brick-and-mortar jewelry shop against a distributed denial-of-service attack. The unnamed site was choking on an assault that delivered almost 35,000 HTTP requests per second, making it unreachable to legitimate users. When Sucuri used a network addressing and routing system known as Anycast to neutralize the attack, the assailants increased the number of HTTP requests to 50,000 per second.
  • Study finds Password Misuse in Hospitals a Steaming Hot Mess
    Hospitals are pretty hygienic places – except when it comes to passwords, it seems. That’s the conclusion of a recent study by researchers at Dartmouth College, the University of Pennsylvania and USC, which found that efforts to circumvent password protections are “endemic” in healthcare environments and mostly go unnoticed by hospital IT staff. The report describes what can only be described as wholesale abandonment of security best practices at hospitals and other clinical environments – with the bad behavior being driven by necessity rather than malice.
  • Why are hackers increasingly targeting the healthcare industry?
    Cyber-attacks in the healthcare environment are on the rise, with recent research suggesting that critical healthcare systems could be vulnerable to attack. In general, the healthcare industry is proving lucrative for cybercriminals because medical data can be used in multiple ways, for example fraud or identify theft. This personal data often contains information regarding a patient’s medical history, which could be used in targeted spear-phishing attacks.
  • Making the internet more secure
  • Beyond Monocultures
  • Dodging Raindrops Escaping the Public Cloud