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MDV

OpenMandriva Lx Release Schedule, Sort of

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Linux
MDV

ostatic.com: Last week when I wrote about the OpenMandriva Lx Beta delay I was a bit frustrated because I couldn't find any kind of release schedule for OpenMandriva Lx. Well, apparently I wasn't the only one because a long time contributor asked the technical committee for one. The answer was a bit disappointing I'm sure.

OpenMandriva Beta Postponed, YaST Gone Ruby

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MDV
SUSE

ostatic.com: Since last week's server issues over at the OpenMandriva camp, the beta has been delayed a bit as well as overshadowing what would have been an anniversary announcement. In the meantime, over at the openSUSE project, YaST Developer Lukas Ocilka blogged today that the migration of YaST to Ruby is complete.

OpenMandriva.org Suffers Outage, Restored Now

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MDV
Web

ostatic.com: I'd been wondering when some news was going to come out of the OpenMandriva camp, but today's tidbit wasn't what I hoped. Instead of a developmental release to test, Anurag Bhandari posted to announce that the OpenMandriva network was back up and running.

Win back your digital independence with Mandriva

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MDV

mandriva.com: Recent news regarding United States governmental agencies collecting and monitoring data across the Internet were pretty well known for years among the tech community. There have been extensive discussions about this topic inside Mandriva, and we felt we needed to stress that these concerns are extremely important to us and should be the same to you.

Mandriva Linux: Which Fork Is Right for You?

Filed under
Linux
MDV

datamation.com: Mandriva Linux is a newbie-centric distribution that has become less of a highlight in the news over the past few years. At one time, Mandriva was considered the de facto Linux distribution for anyone looking to switch from Windows to Linux. Today, Linux has evolved into a complex ecosystem, and selecting Mandriva isn't as black and white as it once was.

Mandriva 2013...What it might look like

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MDV

mandrivachronicles.blogspot: Although not many people talked about this, there was an official alpha released and I decided to install it to a VM to see what it offers. These are my findings:

OpenMandriva Picks Name, Releases Alpha

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MDV

ostatic.com: While the rest of Linuxdom was reading of the Debian 7.0 and Mageia 3 releases, the OpenMandriva gang have been hard at it trying to get their new distribution some attention.

OpenMandriva Delayed, Mageia Releases Beta

Filed under
Linux
MDV
Ubuntu
  • OpenMandriva Delayed, Mageia Releases Beta
  • DistroRank Weekly rankings posted - 4/4/13
  • Emmabuntüs 2 celebrated Software Freedom Day
  • Bytemark donation boosts reliability of Debian's core infrastructure
  • Moving to Arch from Ubuntu!
  • Ubuntu “Raring Ringtail” hits beta, disables Windows dual-boot tool
  • Three Ubuntu Linux versions will reach end of life in May

Mandriva invests in Formula One racing

Filed under
MDV
Humor

mandriva.com: Mandriva S.A. , the leading European Linux based software vendor, is unveiling the new milestone in its corporate strategy. Mandriva S.A. will now invest in Formula One racing.

OpenMandriva's "Get a Face" Finalists Chosen

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MDV

ostatic.com: Well the public has had its say and now it's up to the committee. Seven finalists were chosen by the public, now all they can do is wait.

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