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MDV

Mageia 4 review – Cinnamon, GNOME 3, KDE and MATE desktops

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MDV

The project makes separate installation ISO images for the GNOME 3 and KDE desktop environments available for download. Support for other desktop environments – Cinnamon, Enlightenment (E17), LXDE, MATE, RazorQt and Xfce – are provided via the DVD installation and Network Install CD images

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Mandriva releases new version of systems management software

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Linux
MDV

The French GNU/Linux company Mandriva has released a new version of Pulse, its IT systems management software.

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Mageia 4.0, hands-on: Another excellent release

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MDV
Reviews

A few years ago (September 2010 to be exact), when things got really crazy with the Mandriva distribution, some of the core developers and users announced that they were establishing a fork to continue the development and distribution with the new name Mageia. That has proven to be a very good decision, because they have just made their fourth major release.

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New year, new resolutions and a new Mageia – here’s Mageia 4!

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MDV

Right on time, and just in time for the first day of FOSDEM 2014, we have the great pleasure of announcing Mageia 4. We’re still having a grand time doing this together, and we hope you enjoy this release as much as we’ve enjoyed making it. And if you’re at FOSDEM, come and help us celebrate!

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Mageia 4 Out Next Week, Mandriva and PCLinuxOS Still Very Much Alive

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Linux
PCLOS
MDV

Mandriva and its derivatives/relatives continue to produce good desktop distributions which are RPM-based

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Mandriva, The Distro-Zombie That Refused To Die

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MDV

Instead of being just a supplier of GNU/Linux, Mandriva has added plenty of software and services all its own aimed at businesses. They must even have salesmen… In their enthusiasm they wrote, “In 2006, hundred of millions of personal computers pre-installed with Linux were shipped, particularly to South America, East Europe, Russia, North Africa and India. Mandriva also participates in thematic projects with Intel, such as the Classmate PC.” With optimism/ambition like that they could go far. We await the next chapter…

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Good Bye Mandriva

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MDV

The beginnings of the OpenMandriva project were rough. The very rationale for the existence of OpenMandriva were not overly clear to many people. After all, the Mageia project was already booming and the justification for such a project that was aiming at building upon the Mandriva Linux legacy was weak. On top of this, the team behind the project was small, and the mission was overwhelming: to continue, as a community, the development of the linux distribution formerly known as Mandriva Linux. I will not really go into details as to how the project evolved, but I am proud to have contributed in a significant way to build the home for this project, namely an independent French NGO (the OpenMandriva Association) and to have helped the community with establishing its governance and some of its sound principles and processes. But the question remains: why does the OpenMandriva Project matter? Why should we care

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Mandriva Moving Forward With PCLinuxOS and Mageia

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Linux
PCLOS
MDV

For those who think that Mandrake/Mandriva are gone and are merely part of history it should be important to recognise forks and derivatives, including OpenMandriva. One day it might be a Mandriva derivative — not a RHEL or Debian derivative — that becomes the most widely used GNU/Linux distribution (or operating system). ChromeOS and SteamOS, for instance, are based on rather different systems of GNU/Linux.

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Mandriva moving closer to release

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MDV

Nearly 18 months after the company was re-organised, Mandriva, the French GNU/Linux company is making progress towards a release, according to Charles-H. Schulz, its marketing and open source relations manager.

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One Week with OpenMandriva Lx 2013

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Linux
MDV

Curiously, I did not experience the live session that installs itself, reported here. I could navigate the live session before deciding to install without any problem.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS

  • SQLite Just Got A Big Speed Boost: Now 2x As Fast As SQLite 3.8.0
  • LibreOffice 4.4.5 Brings Bug-Fixes Only
  • Oracle Linux 6.7 Arrives, Few Days After Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.7
  • Oracle: Docker container tech will be in the Zone on Solaris
    Oracle is the latest company to get on the Docker bandwagon, having announced support for the application container technology to come in a future version of Solaris Unix. Docker arose out of the Linux world, and its original implementation takes advantage of a number of Linux kernel features, including LXC, cgroups, and namespaces. Solaris, meanwhile, has had native support for containers since 2005, in the form of Solaris Zones. Rather than aping how Docker handles containers on Linux, Oracle plans to stick with this arguably superior technology.
  • Oracle Said To Be Baking A Low-Cost SPARC Chip
  • Dummy projects for new Drupal hires
    Lakhani's current role involves promoting the use of applications like Drupal, WordPress, Magento, and Redline through free tools and services. But, this Denver-based executive's experience shows most in forming the global, distributed team of developers and support staff inherent to success.
  • from distribution to project
    OpenBSD is going through something of a minimalist phase right now, but that wasn’t always the case. There was definitely an era of aggressive importation as well. Times change, priorities change, projects change. I wasn’t involved with OpenBSD during the early years, but I think I can explain the shift in attitudes. This is part three of an apparently ongoing series that started with Pruning and Polishing and out with the old, in with the less.
  • sashan@ on SMP pf progress
    One of our new developers, Alexandr Nedvedicky (sashan@), writes in to tell us about his trip to the lovely locale of Calgary for c2k15.
  • IT trade groups protest Slovak licence deal
    Two IT trade associations in the Slovak Republic are objecting the renewal of a proprietary software licence contract negotiated by the country’s Ministry of Finance for all government organisations. Instead of continuing to rely on proprietary office suites, the groups want the Slovakian government to explore a transition to open source alternatives.
  • WEBINAR - A standard that is not managed is not a standard
    Through their brief webinar Marijke and Marco will share with the audience how the Dutch Government is promoting the adoption of open standards through BOMOS, a method (initiated by Dr. Erwin Folmer, TNO with contribution from Marijke) which describes how to maintain and manage open standards.

Security Leftovers

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Small number of computer-aided rifles could be hacked in contrived scenario
    The internet is reeling today at the "news" that a rare make of computer-aided gunsight can under certain circumstances be hacked into, permitting a hacker to interfere with a suitably-equipped rifle's aim. The gunsight in question is the much-hyped but seldom purchased TrackingPoint kit, a system with a Linux machine at its heart which can be fitted to a range of different rifles. The TrackingPoint (details on its capabilities are at the end of this article) is mainly a curiosity. People who would be interested in it - experienced long-range marksmen - basically don't need it, and people who need it - those who have seldom or never fired a rifle - typically don't want it. And very few in either group can afford it.
  • Researchers Hack Linux-Powered, Self-Aiming Smart Rifle, Causing It To Change Targets
  • Remote code execution via serialized data
    Serialization and, more importantly, deserialization of data is unsafe due to the simple fact that the data being processed is trusted implicitly as being “correct.” So if you’re taking data such as program variables from a non trusted source you’re making it possible for an attacker to control program flow. Additionally many programming languages now support serialization of not just data (e.g. strings, arrays, etc.) but also of code objects. For example with Python pickle() you can actually serialize user defined classes, you can take a section of code, ship it to a remote system, and it is executed there.
  • To exec or transition that is the question...
  • CIL – Part1: Faster SELinux policy (re)build
  • FCC Rules Block use of Open Source
    The United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has introduced ‘software security requirements’ obliging WiFi device manufacturers to “ensure that only properly authenticated software is loaded and operating the device”. The document specifically calls out the DD-WRT open source router project, but clearly also applies to other popular distributions such as OpenWRT. This could become an early battle in ‘The war on general purpose computing’ as many smartphones and Internet of Things devices contain WiFi router capabilities that would be covered by the same rules.
  • Hacked Jeep Cherokee Exposes Weak Underbelly of High-Tech Cars
    The Jeep Cherokee brought to a halt by hackers last week exposed wireless networks as the weakest link in high-tech vehicles, underscoring the need to find fast over-the-air fixes to block malicious intrusions. Features that buyers now expect in most modern automobiles, such as driving directions and restaurant guides, count on a constant connection to a telecommunications network. But that link also makes cars vulnerable to security invasions like those that threaten computers in homes and businesses.

Open source Copyright Hub unveiled with '90+ projects' in the pipeline

The web has grown up without letting people own and control their own stuff, but a British-backed initiative might change all that, offering a glimpse of how the internet can work in the future. Their work will all be open sourced early next year. Britain's much-anticipated Copyright Hub was given ministerial blessing when it finally opened its kimono today, boasting a pipeline of over 90 projects covering commercial and free uses. Read more