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MDV

Mageia 4.0, hands-on: Another excellent release

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MDV
Reviews

A few years ago (September 2010 to be exact), when things got really crazy with the Mandriva distribution, some of the core developers and users announced that they were establishing a fork to continue the development and distribution with the new name Mageia. That has proven to be a very good decision, because they have just made their fourth major release.

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New year, new resolutions and a new Mageia – here’s Mageia 4!

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MDV

Right on time, and just in time for the first day of FOSDEM 2014, we have the great pleasure of announcing Mageia 4. We’re still having a grand time doing this together, and we hope you enjoy this release as much as we’ve enjoyed making it. And if you’re at FOSDEM, come and help us celebrate!

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Mageia 4 Out Next Week, Mandriva and PCLinuxOS Still Very Much Alive

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Linux
PCLOS
MDV

Mandriva and its derivatives/relatives continue to produce good desktop distributions which are RPM-based

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Mandriva, The Distro-Zombie That Refused To Die

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MDV

Instead of being just a supplier of GNU/Linux, Mandriva has added plenty of software and services all its own aimed at businesses. They must even have salesmen… In their enthusiasm they wrote, “In 2006, hundred of millions of personal computers pre-installed with Linux were shipped, particularly to South America, East Europe, Russia, North Africa and India. Mandriva also participates in thematic projects with Intel, such as the Classmate PC.” With optimism/ambition like that they could go far. We await the next chapter…

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Good Bye Mandriva

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MDV

The beginnings of the OpenMandriva project were rough. The very rationale for the existence of OpenMandriva were not overly clear to many people. After all, the Mageia project was already booming and the justification for such a project that was aiming at building upon the Mandriva Linux legacy was weak. On top of this, the team behind the project was small, and the mission was overwhelming: to continue, as a community, the development of the linux distribution formerly known as Mandriva Linux. I will not really go into details as to how the project evolved, but I am proud to have contributed in a significant way to build the home for this project, namely an independent French NGO (the OpenMandriva Association) and to have helped the community with establishing its governance and some of its sound principles and processes. But the question remains: why does the OpenMandriva Project matter? Why should we care

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Mandriva Moving Forward With PCLinuxOS and Mageia

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Linux
PCLOS
MDV

For those who think that Mandrake/Mandriva are gone and are merely part of history it should be important to recognise forks and derivatives, including OpenMandriva. One day it might be a Mandriva derivative — not a RHEL or Debian derivative — that becomes the most widely used GNU/Linux distribution (or operating system). ChromeOS and SteamOS, for instance, are based on rather different systems of GNU/Linux.

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Mandriva moving closer to release

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MDV

Nearly 18 months after the company was re-organised, Mandriva, the French GNU/Linux company is making progress towards a release, according to Charles-H. Schulz, its marketing and open source relations manager.

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One Week with OpenMandriva Lx 2013

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Linux
MDV

Curiously, I did not experience the live session that installs itself, reported here. I could navigate the live session before deciding to install without any problem.

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The Mandriva Family Expands With the Release of OpenMandriva Lx 2013.0

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MDV

Having more choices is essential for a project’s survival and expansion. Mandrake/Mandriva was once the most widely used desktop distribution. It can still make a huge comeback.

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Goodbye Mageia 2

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MDV

Dear Mageia users, the time has come to say goodbye to the Mageia 2 Linux operating system, as on November 22, 2013 it will reach end of life (EOL).

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More in Tux Machines

FoundationDB Source Code Shared

​Learn to use GitHub, ​GitHub Releases Atom 1.26

  • ​Learn to use GitHub with GitHub Learning Lab
    The most popular open-source development site in the world is GitHub. It's used by tens of millions of developers to work on over 80 million projects. It's not just a site where people use Linus Torvalds' Git open-source distributed version control system. It's also an online home for collaboration, a sandbox for testing, a launchpad for deployment, and a platform for learning new skills. The GitHub Training Team has now released an app, GitHub Learning Lab, so you can join the programming party. GitHub Learning Lab is not a tutorial or webcast. It's an app that gives you a hands-on learning experience within GitHub. According to GitHub, "Our friendly bot will take you through a series of practical, fun labs that will give you the skills you need in no time--and share helpful feedback along the way."
  • Atom 1.26
    Atom 1.26 has been released on our stable channel and includes GitHub package improvements, fuzzy-finder support for Teletype and file system watcher improvements.
  • Atom Hackable Text Editor Gets GitHub Package, Filesystem Watcher Improvements
    GitHub announced the release of the Atom 1.26 open-source and cross-platform hackable text editor for Linux, macOS, and Windows platforms with more improvements and bug fixes. In Atom 1.26, the GitHub package received various improvements and new features, among which we can mention the ability of the ’s Git pane to display a read-only list of recent commits for quick reference, and support for storing your GitHub username and password credentials in the Git authentication dialog.

Games Leftovers

Linux and Linux Foundation

  • V3D DRM Driver Steps Towards Mainline Kernel, Renamed From VC5
    The Broadcom VC5 driver stack is being renamed to V3D and developer Eric Anholt is looking at merging it into the mainline Linux kernel. The VC5 DRM/KMS and Mesa code has been for supporting the next-generation Broadcom VideoCore 5 graphics hardware that's only now beginning to appear in some devices, well, it seems one device so far. Though as I pointed out a few months back, there's already "VC6" activity going on too as the apparent successor to VC5 already being in development.
  • Azure Sphere Makes Microsoft an Arm Linux Player for IoT [Ed: Microsoft marketing at LF (only runs on/with Windows and Visual Studio etc.)]
  • Keynotes Announced for Automotive Linux Summit & OS Summit Japan [Ed: "Senior Software Engineer, Microsoft" in there; LF has once again let Microsoft infiltrate Linux events; in the words of Microsoft’s chief evangelist, “I’ve killed at least two Mac conferences. […] by injecting Microsoft content into the conference, the conference got shut down. The guy who ran it said, why am I doing this?”]
    Automotive Linux Summit connects those driving innovation in automotive Linux from the developer community with the vendors and users providing and using the code, in order to propel the future of embedded devices in the automotive arena.