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MDV

Mageia 7 Pushes Linux Desktop Boundaries

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MDV
Reviews

Linux dispels the notion that one universal computing platform must define the features and functionality for all users. That is why so many distributions exist.

The Mageia distro is a prime example of how freedom and choice are the hallmarks of open source operating systems. Mageia 7 pushes the limits of personal choice and usability definitions.

What gives Mageia Linux its edge is its independence. Mageia 7 is not based on a predefined Linux family of distributions.

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Review: Mageia 7

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Mageia is a user friendly, desktop-oriented Linux distribution. The project originally grew out of the Mandriva family of distributions and is independently developed. The project's latest release is Mageia 7 which, according to the project's release notes, offers 18 months of support. Mageia 7 drops support for the ARMv5 architecture while adding support for 64-bit ARM (Aarch64) and improving support for ARMv7. While ARM packages are being built, ARM installation media is not yet featured on the project's download page. The new release includes the DNF command line package manager and features the ability to play MP3 files - MP3 support was not included by default in previous releases due to patent restrictions.

The release notes mention that GNOME users can enjoy their desktop running on a Wayland session by default with X.Org available as an alternative. KDE Plasma users will have the opposite experience with their desktop running on X.Org and a Wayland session available through a package in the distribution's repositories. The documentation also mentions that when running a GNOME on Wayland session some graphical administrator tools will not work when run through su or sudo. The user can run these tools with their regular user privileges and the system will prompt for an admin password when necessary.

Mageia is available for the 32-bit (x86) and 64-bit (x86_64) architectures. We can either download an install DVD with multiple desktop packages bundled or we can download live media with the Plasma, GNOME, or Xfce desktops. There are smaller net-install disc images available too. I decided to try the KDE Plasma live disc which is a 2.8GB download.

Booting from the live media brings up a menu which gives us the option of immediately loading the project's system installer or launching a live desktop environment. Choosing the live desktop brings up a series of graphical screens asking us to select our language from a list, confirm the distribution's license agreement, and we are offered a chance to read the release notes. We are then asked to select our time zone from a list and confirm our keyboard's layout.

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Mageia Magical (lucky?) release number 7 has arrived

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MDV

Everyone at Mageia is very happy to announce the release of Mageia 7. We all hope that the release works as well for you as it has during our testing and development.

There are lots of new features, exciting updates, and new versions of your favorite programs, as well as support for very recent hardware. The release is available to download directly, or as a torrent from here.

There are classical installer images for both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures, as well as live DVD’s for 64-bit Plasma, GNOME, Xfce, and 32-bit Xfce.

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Also: Mageia 7 Sets Sail With Linux 5.1, KDE Plasma 5.15.4 Desktop

Review: OpenMandriva Lx 4.0

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OpenMandriva is a desktop-oriented distribution that originally grew from the Mandriva family of Linux distributions. Like other community projects which rose from the ashes of Mandriva, OpenMandriva places a focus on providing a polished desktop experience that is easy to install. Unlike most other community distributions in the Mandriva family, OpenMandriva uses the Calamares installer, its own custom settings panel for managing the operating system, and builds packages using the Clang compiler instead of the GNU Compiler Collection.

OpenMandriva 4.0 introduces some other changes too, including using Fedora's DNF command line package manager and switching from using Python 2 to Python 3 by default. Python 2 is still available in the distribution's repositories for people who need to use the older version of the language.

The project's latest release is available in two builds and both of them feature the KDE Plasma desktop and run on 64-bit (x86_64) machines. One build (called "znver1") is for modern CPUs while the other is a generic 64-bit build. I was unable to find any precise information on what the minimal requirements were for running "znver1" and so used the generic build for my trial. There are mentions of ARM support in the project's release notes, but at the time of writing there is just one tarball for an ARM build on the distribution's mirrors.

Curiously, on release day, the release notes also mentioned a LXQt build of OpenMandriva and a minimal desktop build. Neither of these were available on release day and it seems the release notes are out of date (or premature). The release announcement also offers a link to torrent downloads, but there were no torrents available on the server, even a week after OpenMandriva 4.0 was launched. (The following week torrent files were made available.) All of this is to say the documentation did not match what was actually available when version 4.0 became available.

The generic 64-bit build of OpenMandriva was a 2.4GB download. Booting from the project's ISO seemed to get stuck for a minute after passing the boot menu, but eventually a splash screen appeared, followed by a welcome window. The welcome screen offers us information on package versions and displays links to on-line resources. The welcome window also offers to help us change settings, which we can probably skip until after the distribution has been installed.

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OpenMandriva Is Also Making Plans To Move Away From 32-Bit Support

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In addition to Ubuntu planning to drop 32-bit packages with their 19.10 release, the OpenMandriva development team is another high profile Linux distribution drafting plans to eliminate their 32-bit support.

OpenMandriva's plans to drop 32-bit are much more conservative than Canonical with planning for these changes by the October release of Ubuntu 19.10. In the case of OpenMandriva, they will gradually reduce their exposure to 32-bit in hopes of weening users to 64-bit where possible.

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Also: OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 released, here are the new features

The best, until OpenMandriva does better: released OMLx 4.0

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Exciting news!
Shortly after the release candidate we are very proud to introduce you the fruit of so much work, some visible and much more behind the scenes and under the hood.

OpenMandriva Lx is a cutting edge distribution compiled with LLVM/clang, combined with the high level of optimisation used for both code and linking (by enabling LTO, and profile guided optimizations for some key packages where reliable profile data is easy to generate) used in its building.

OMLx 4.0 brings a number of major changes since 3.x release...

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Also: OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Released With AMD Zen Optimized Option, Toolchain Updates

Mageia 7 RC released for testing

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The Mageia Community is very happy to announce what will hopefully be the last release before Mageia 7 is final. We all hope that this release builds on the quality of the previous beta releases.

The release process so far has been smooth so we all hope that there are no new release critical bugs found here and that we can get Mageia 7 out into the wild shortly!

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Also: Mageia 7 Release Candidate Ships With Linux 5.1 Kernel, KDE Plasma 5.15.4, Mesa 19.1

Want A Google-Free Android? Send Your Phone To This Guy

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OS
Android
MDV

The recent US ban on Huawei may have reignited the debate over Android’s dominance and Google’s control over the smartphone market.

The result of the ban is that Huawei had to come up with a new OS that doesn’t even have an inkling of Google’s proprietary software. For the rest of us, we have different third-party ROMs which try to remove Google from our phones in some way.

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OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 RC Released, Rebases To LLVM Clang 8, Java 12, Linux 5.1

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Following their success in stripping out the remaining Python 2 bits, the release candidate of OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 is now available.

OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 is a big release with many changes that include upgrading to the LLVM Clang 8.0 as the default system compiler, switching back from RPM5 to RPM4, offering AMD Zen optimized support, ARM 64-bit support, an updated Calamares installer, and many other changes for this Mandriva/Mandrake-rooted distribution.

With the OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 release candidate besides upgrading to LLVM Clang 8, they have also pulled in the Linux 5.1 kernel, KDE Plasma 5.15.5 + KDE Applications 19.04.1, Qt 5.12, systemd 242, and Java 12. There is also a variety of user applications updated too like Firefox 66.

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Also: OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 RC released

armv7hl support for mageia docker official images

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After some months of on and off work with @Conan-Kudo on improving mageia's docker images build tools to support multi-arch builds, we finally were able to add armv7hl support to mageia 6.

Usage is completely transparent to the user, when pulling the image, the docker daemon will take care to download the correct image according to the host server architecture.

Also, now that our build tools support multiarch builds, the moment mageia 7 is available armv8 images will be available too, at the same time of the x86_64 image.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Storage Stories, Daniel Foré, Linux Headlines, Open Source Security Podcast and LHS

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  • 2020-04-03 | Linux Headlines

    Outreachy receives the second Open Source Community Grant from IBM, the LLVM project adds mitigations for Load Value Injection attacks, more bad news for the Linux-based Atari VCS console, and the Python Software Foundation seeks recurring sponsorships to support its software repository.

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Programming: POCL 1.5, Remote Technical Work, LLVM and Ada++

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    A more detailed changelog here. Please note that there's an official pocl maintenance policy in place. This text describes the policy and how you can get your favourite project that uses OpenCL to remain regression free in the future pocl releases.

  • POCL 1.5 Released With Performance Improvements, Fixes For OpenCL On CPUs

    POCL 1.5 has been released as the "Portable CL" implementation for running OpenCL on CPUs and other devices with LLVM back-ends. The POCL project lets OpenCL 1.2~2.0 run over CPU back-ends as well as for running OpenCL on NVIDIA GPUs over CUDA, on AMD GPUs via HSA, and other accelerator targets that have LLVM back-end coverage.

  • How to work from home like a pro

    Across the globe, businesses are transitioning to remote work. While remote work or "working from home" has been an overall growing trend, the recent push to transition has been driven by the COVID-19 response; organizations are asking staff to work from home to help limit the spread of the Coronavirus. If you are like many of your peers, you may quite suddenly find yourself working from home. How can you remain productive at home when you're used to going into an office? A year ago, I launched my own business as a consultant. When I'm not working with a client, I'm working from my home, and during that time, I've learned a thing or two about how to be most effective. I'd like to share a few of those tips here.

  • LLVM Lands Performance-Hitting Mitigation For Intel LVI Vulnerability

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