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MDV

Mageia 8 is on its way

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MDV

The road to get Mageia 8 is winding, slow but steady.

The current situation is that major packages have been updated to latest versions, such as:

– latest Linux kernel 5.9.6 built for x86_64, i586, arm7l and aarch64 architectures,which can recognize all new released hardware since Mageia 7.1. We intend to release Mageia 8 with a Long Term Support Kernel. 5.10 will be the new LTS one, just around the corner for a December release. We will ship with this version.

– basesystem with systemd 246, glibc 2.31, GCC 10.2, LLVM 10.0.1, urpmi 8.123, DNF 4.2.23 and rpm 4.16.0 ;

– Java stack updated to java-11-openjdk (11.0.9.6) and built against this version;- python 3.8.5, rust 1.47, ruby 2.7.2, Golang 1.15.3,…

We decided to stop supporting Java 8, and only have Java 11. This requires fixing the Java stack, as some applications have never been ported, and therefore have to be removed, while others have to be updated to the ported version.

On the desktop side, we have an updated x11-server to 1.20.9 stack. A Wayland session for GNOME is available on Intel, AMD and even NVIDIA (with nvidia-current nonfree drivers). KDE Plasma is based on QT 5.15.1 with Plasma-Workspace 5.20.2, which can permit a wayland session preview. All infrastructure is here for it to have a desktop running on modern technologies. By default, we still ship Plasma with an X11 session on all hardware.

GNOME is at 3.38.1. LXqt is 0.16. XFCE is at 4.15 preview and is a good candidate to move to the 4.16 release before we ship Mageia 8.

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Also: Mageia 8 Linux OS Is Inching Closer To Release

Distros: Absolute64, OpenMandriva, and Ubuntu

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GNU
Linux
MDV
Slack
Ubuntu
  • Absolute64-20201103 released

    Based on Slackware64-current.
    Keeping up with wholesale library changes (especially python) and kernels, etc...
    (Will there ever be a Slackware 15?)
    Edited some utilities to adjust to new libs.
    Tighten up the UI/mime/icons.

  • Progress on OMLx 4.2

    Work continues on OMLx 4.2. It is anticipated that Beta release should be happening in the next week or two.

  • Accessibility audit of Vanilla framework | Ubuntu

    The team behind the Vanilla Framework has a background in development, UX and Visual Design. We all care about accessibility, but none of us is an accessibility expert.

    We were interested in evaluating how well the framework complies with accessibility standards. We decided to start with an internal audit, fix any issues we find, then look for a third-party service to evaluate the framework from the perspective of real-world users with disabilities

We are very sad to announce that José Jorge, who used the login zezinho, passed away on September the 11th

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MDV
Obits

José was 46 years old, father to 3 children. He, and his 16 year old son, who was accompanying him on a bicycle ride, died September the 11th after being struck by a car.

José was a major contributor to the world of Free Software, in particular Mageia, his favorite distribution, which he had adopted after Mandrake/Mandriva and in which he had been actively participating for some 20 years. Among his many contributions were the inclusion of hundreds of packages such as Audacity, Chromium, fuse2, gcompris, other very important packages such as various WiFi drivers, as well as many games (bzflag, alienarena, crack-attack, flightgear). He was a tester
for Mageia Cauldron and a mentor for new packagers.

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News from our package manager “urpmi”

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MDV

News from our package manager “urpmi” :
Inherited from the Mandriva distribution, Mageia’s default package manager is URPMI. It offers a wide range of features to manage software repositories, install, update and remove applications packaged in rpm format. This standardized format is adopted by many well-known distributions, such as Redhat, Fedora, Centos, Suse and Opensuse. Urpmi is also used to update your distribution.
This tool comes with many tools :
– urpmi, urpme to install and remove applications,
– urpmq to search for an application by querying repositories
– urpmf to search for a package from the files it contains
– urpmi.update to update your system and applications
– urpmi.addmedia and urpmi.removemedia to add, remove your software repositories.

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More Progress for Mageia 8 – Beta 1 is available for testing

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MDV

We are happy to announce the release of Mageia 8 Beta 1. After the good feedback from Alpha 1, there have been some improvements and fixes for this release, we look forward to hearing your feedback and thoughts so that we can continue to get Mageia 8 ready for release.

A full list of included packages is available in the .idx file for the installation media.

For those that want to jump in and test straight away, the images can be downloaded here, as always with pre-release images, use your best judgement.

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Also: Mageia 8 Beta 1 Released With Many Improvements

OpenMandriva Lx 4.2 Alpha available for testing

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MDV

Here we have the Alpha milestone of OpenMandriva Lx 4.2 release cycle.

Warning: This is an alpha product, and it is not aimed to be used in a production environment.

Alpha release is primarily for testing and bug squashing. Testing is a critical step during development as all bug fixing will take place during this lapse of time.
Therefore we exhort all OpenMandriva users to test our system and report any issue you may find at our forum or at Github Issues.
You can get in touch real time with our developers at IRC channel #openmandriva-cooker on freenode.

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OpenMandriva Progressing On Rolling Release Version, Moving Away From i686 Repository

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MDV

For those looking for another rolling-release Linux distribution to try and one whose roots trace back to the legendary Mandrake Linux, OpenMandriva has been working to establish its own rolling-release spin for those preferring the latest software packages as opposed to their conventional releases. Additionally, OpenMandriva is nearing the end of its i686 repository offering while continuing to work with Wine and 32-bit games.

OpenMandriva has for a while been working to move away from 32-bit packages similar to the other modern Linux distributions out there. OpenMandriva users though have still had to enable the i686 repository if needing select packages, notably for games / Wine use-cases.

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The first step towards Mageia 8 – Alpha 1 is available for testing

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MDV

We are happy to announce the release of the test images of Mageia 8. These are available to early testers to help with the development towards a stable final release of Mageia 8. There have been large scale updates of all packages as well as new features implemented to improve what Mageia already offered.

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Also: Mageia 8 Enters Development with Linux Kernel 5.7, Improved ARM Support

Mageia 8 Alpha 1 Released With Better ARM Support, Linux 5.7 Kernel

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MDV

Mageia 8 Alpha 1 is out this morning as the newest version of this Linux distribution that originates from the once legendary Mandrake Linux.

Mageia 8 has been working on better ARM support, they have nearly wrapped up their Python 2 removal effort, RPM package metadata is now compressed with Zstd rather than XZ for faster processing, the Linux 5.7 kernel is powering the distro, various packaging improvements, Mageia Control Center enhancements, and a newer KDE Plasma stack for the default desktop experience.

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OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 2020.05 snapshot

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MDV

OMLx ’Rock’ (currently 4.1) is for users who want a stable system.

Please note that Rock system will receive only bug fixes and security updates.

The user wishing for the latest and brightest without having to wait for a new release may want to install ’Rolling’ instead, our new release branch which we are going to officially announce very soon.

By default, only /main repository is enabled in OpenMandriva releases. If you want to find out all the packages available please use Software Repository Selector (om-repo-picker) and enable additional repositories. Guide here.

From time to time we make available Rock snapshots that include fixes for bugs reported after release, and/or important new improvements.

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More in Tux Machines

How can I Identify who SSH into my Linux System?

Identifying who has logged into your system in Linux is way easier than the Windows Operating System. In Linux System whenever someone tries to log in using SSH is recorded by the log file, the log file is located in /var/log/auth.log. location can be different in other distribution. If you not found the auth.log file in your system try to execute the below command to view the log from systemctl. journalctl -u sshd |tail -100
  • -u (Show the user journal for the current)
  • sshd (SSH user created by system by default)
  • tail -100 (Print top 100 result from log file)
journalctl of sshd
User logged in using SSH
Read more

Security Leftovers

  • Sophos tight-lipped about data breach, no lessons learnt from WannaCry bungle

    It's surprising that global cyber security firm Sophos has hidden from public view the fact that it has suffered a security breach which is said to have taken place during the week.

  •                
  • Manchester United being held to RANSOM by cyberhackers who STILL have control over their computers [iophk: Windows TCO]
                     
                       

    The embarrassing lapse of security at one of the world’s biggest sports clubs is believed to be far more serious than first feared.

                       

    United’s network has been infected by ransomware – a computer virus - and they now face the option of having to pay up or risk seeing highly sensitive information about the club and its stars leaked into the public domain.

                       

    It’s unclear who the criminals are or how much they want, but the NCSC revealed that in the last year an EFL club were hit with a £5m demand and the biggest single loss to a sports organisation from cyber crime was £4m.

    United could also face fines of £9m, £18m or two per cent of their total annual worldwide turnover from the independent government body Information Commissioner’s Office if the attack is found to have breached their fans’ data protection – although the club last night reassured supporters that is not the case.

  •                
  • The emerging cybersecurity headaches awaiting Biden
                     
                       

    The incoming administration will face a slew of cybersecurity-related challenges, as Joe Biden takes office under a very different environment than existed when he was last in the White House as vice president.

                       

    The big picture: President-elect Biden's top cybersecurity and national security advisers will have to wrestle with the ascendancy of new adversaries and cyberpowers, as well as figure out whether to continue the more aggressive stance the Trump administration has taken in cyberspace.

                       

    Here are details on some key challenges confronting Biden: [...]

  • Someone attacked our company

    At the start of November, someone decided that they would try to destroy our company. They subjected us to multiple, malicious, targeted DDoS (Distributed Denial-of-Service) attacks over two weeks. They intended to damage the integrity of our customers’ data and take our service offline. This attack wasn’t random and it wasn’t just your typical spam. This attack was targeted at Fathom and was intended to put us out of business.

today's howtos

  • Mullvad and TailScale coexisting (or “Hello Nftables!”)

    The fix was simple eventually – add two rules to the rules created by Mullvad, allowing access to & from the tailscale interface. However, since I took a look at Nftables, and I am sure I’ll forget it in a few days, I wanted to jot down the commands here for future reference.

  • The Origin of the Shell
    CTSS was developed during 1963 and 64. I was at MIT on the computer center staff at that time. After having written dozens of commands for CTSS, I reached the stage where I felt that commands should be usable as building blocks for writing more commands, just like subroutine libraries. Hence, I wrote "RUNCOM", a sort of shell driving the execution of command scripts, with argument substitution. The tool became instantly most popular, as it became possible to go home in the evening while leaving behind long runcoms executing overnight. It was quite neat for boring and repetitive tasks such as renaming, moving, updating, compiling, etc. whole directories of files for system and application maintenance and monitoring.
  • Self-modifying code in production

    YouTube famously uses a rolling cipher and effective downloader tools need to be able to decipher it to produce useful links to video files. The cipher changes every few days so downloader tools avoid the need for daily manual updates by automatically downloading the JavaScript implementation of the cipher from YouTube and caching the result.

    I use three downloader tools that have some automated mechanism for dealing with cipher updates.

  • The better way to make an Ubuntu 20.04 ISO that will boot on UEFI systems

    First, I've learned that you don't want to extract ISO images with 7z, however tempting and easy it seems. 7z has at least two issues with ISO images; it will quietly add the El Torito boot images to the extracted tree, in a new subdirectory called '[BOOT]', and it doesn't extract symlinks (and probably not other Rock Ridge attributes). The Ubuntu 20.04.1 amd64 live server image has some symlinks, although their presence isn't essential.

    The two reliable ways I know of to extract the 20.04.1 ISO image are with bsdtar (part of the libarchive-tools package in Ubuntu) and with xorriso itself. Bsdtar is easier to use but you probably don't have it installed, while you need xorriso anyway and might as well use it for this once you know how. So to unpack the ISO into our scratch tree, you want: [...]

  • How to Add Local User to Sudo Group in Debian Linux

    In Linux/Unix systems, sudo is a program that grants a regular user elevated privileges to execute administrator-level tasks. Once a regular user is added to the sudo group, they are able to carry out tasks that a reserve for the root user. Such include installing and removing software packages, starting and stopping services, updating and upgrading the system to mention a few.

  • How to Install PHP 8 on Debian - Cloudbooklet

    How to Install PHP 8 on Debian. This guide let you learn how install the latest PHP version 8 on your Debian system or your Debian server on any VPS or any Cloud or any Dedicated hosting and configure it with Apache and Nginx. The latest PHP 8 version is officially released on November 26th, 2020. It comes with a number of new features and a few incompatibilities that you should be aware of before upgrading from the previous version. This installation is tested on Google Cloud Platform with a Compute Compute Engine VM Instance. So this set up is guaranteed to work on all Linux based servers.

  • Configuring Dwm's Panel Is Easy With Dwmblocks - YouTube

    Dwm has a builtin panel that can be a bit tough to configure. Getting it to display the information that you want is not as simple as it should be. Thankfully, there is a program called dwmblocks that makes this a lot easier!

This week in KDE: Bugfixes and bug triaging

This week we worked very hard not only fixing bugs in our software, but also on triaging bugs in our venerable bug tracker, bugs.kde.org. Thanks to the coordinating efforts of Justin Zobel, the KDE BugSquad has been working harder than ever to separate the wheat from the chaff so developers can focus on what matters, rather than wading through a sea of obsolete reports and bugs that have been fixed ages ago. If this sounds like fun, please feel free to get involved! Read more