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Mandriva, Turbolinux Step Back from Debian Core Project

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MDV

Progeny and more than half a dozen other Debian Linux distributors are working toward forming a common Debian Linux distribution for the enterprise based on the next version of Progeny's Componentized Linux.

This is not a done deal yet. Two companies previously mentioned as being involved with the project, Mandriva, and Turbolinux Inc., appear to not be participating at this time.

Build a Secure Web Server with Mandriva 2005 LE

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HowTos

The last time we built the Secure Web Server it was quite a success. But it was done on version 10.0 of our beloved OS and it's time for a fresh look at what we can do for web serving. The 2.6 kernel is at a level now that most commercial firms have either already converted or are in the process. What this means for us is even tighter security with more and better hardware support in the kernel.

Mdv Aims to Become Linux-Desktop Player

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Mandriva, with the recent purchase of Lycoris, a U.S. Linux desktop distributor, is expanding rapidly, but analysts ask whether it's growing fast enough to compete with the major Linux vendors: Red Hat and Novell/SuSE.

Joseph Cheek speaks about Mandriva's acquisition of Lycoris

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MDV

Desktop Linux distributor Lycoris has been acquired by Mandriva, the company resulting from the April merger of Mandrake and Conectiva. We asked Lycoris founder Joseph Cheek what the deal means for current and future Lycoris and Mandriva users and developers.

Here's what DesktopLinux.com learned . . .

Planet Mandriva

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MDV

Providing a unique source for updates about the work and lives of Mandriva Linux contributors, around the world and around the clock.

Sneak Peek at Mandriva 2006

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MDV
-s

Mandriva plans on releasing the community version of 2006 on or about August 15 and Official on September 15. With the first beta expected in little over week, I thought it wouldn't be entirely inappropriate to take a look at the current cooker and get an idea of the kinds of things to which we can look forward.

Mandriva Linux: The next generation Distro ?

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MDV

Linux distributions have become better and more user friendly over the years while retaining their characterising stability. To prove this I have just run a completely new installation of Mandriva Linux 2005 limited edition. Mandriva Linux has always been renowed as one of the most user friendly distributions available.

Building a Mandriva 2005 Desktop

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MDV
HowTos

A first-timers guide to installing and configuring Mandriva Linux

Mandriva LE 2005 Uploaded

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MDV

A little birdie told me that the Mandriva isos are being uploaded to ftp mirrors.

More on this as it becomes available.

UPDATE: Tho not officially announced, the isos are fully loaded on several ftp mirrors. One of which is carroll.cac.psu.edu.

First Look at a Distro Changed: Mandriva LE 2005

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Reviews

If there is indeed a desktop Linux market, Mandrake Linux was one of the founding fathers, and up until their recent purchase of Conectiva Linux (and subsequent name change to Mandriva), they've reigned right along side other big-name contenders such as Novell/SUSE, Red Hat, Linspire, and Xandros... and you know what? They've done damn well, even surviving near extinction at one point when they filed "declaration de cessation des paiements" which is the French equivalent of Chapter 11 bankruptcy in the USA. How does the future of their desktop look? Stick around. We're about to find out.

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More in Tux Machines

Devices: PCB, OpenCV/RasPi and NVIDIA Jetson Nano

  • A beginner tries PCB assembly

    I wrote last year about my experience with making my first PCB using JLCPCB. I’ve now got 5 of the boards in production around my house, and another couple assembled on my desk for testing. I also did a much simpler board to mount a GPS module on my MapleBoard - basically just with a suitable DIP connector and mount point for the GPS module. At that point I ended up having to pay for shipping; not being in a hurry I went for the cheapest option which mean the total process took 2 weeks from order until it arrived. Still not bad for under $8! Just before Christmas I discovered that JLCPCB had expanded their SMT assembly option to beyond the Chinese market, and were offering coupons off (but even without that had much, much lower assembly/setup fees than anywhere else I’d seen). Despite being part of LCSC the parts library can be a bit limited (partly it seems there’s nothing complex to assemble such as connectors), with a set of “basic” components without setup fee and then “extended” options which have a $3 setup fee (because they’re not permanently loaded, AIUI).

  • Digitizing a analog water meter

    Sadly, my meter is really dirt under the glass and i couldn’t manage to clean it. This will cause problems down the road. The initial idea was easy, add a webcam on top of the meter and read the number on the upper half it. But I soon realized that the project won’t be that simple. The number shows only the use of 1m^3 (1000 liters), this means that I would have a change only every couple of days, which is useless and boring. So, I had to read the analog gauges, which show the fraction in 0.0001, 0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 m^3. This discovery blocked me, and I was like “this is way to complicated”. I have no idea how I found or what reminded me of OpenCV, but that was the solution. OpenCV is an awesome tool for computer vision, it has many features like Facial recognition, Gesture recognition … and also shape recognition. What’s a analog gauge? It’s just a circle with an triangular arrow indicating the value.

  • NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit-B01 Gets an Extra Camera Connector

    Launched in March 2019, NVIDIA Jetson Nano developer kit offered an AI development platform for an affordable $99.

today's howtos

XMPP - Fun with Clients

As I already wrote in my last blog post there's much development in XMPP, not only on the server side, but also on the client side. It's surely not exaggerated to say that Conversations on Android is the de-facto standard client-wise. So, if you have an Android phone, that's the client you want to try&use. As I don't have Android, I can't comment on it. The situation on Linux is good as well: there are such clients as Gajim, which is an old player in the "market" and is available on other platforms as well, but there is with Dino a new/modern client as well that you may want to try out. The situation for macOS and iOS users are not that good as for Windows, Linux or Android users. But in the end all clients have their pro and cons... I'll try to summarize a few clients on Linux, macOS and iOS... Read more

Linux disk resizing on Chromebooks pushed back to Chrome OS 81

The good news is that plans have been in the works since March of last year to allow you to reclaim some of that space by shrinking or resizing the Linux storage. The bad news is that after being pushed back twice since the feature is being put off again; this time until Chrome OS 81. You’d think this would be a relatively simple thing to implement but in reality, it’s not. That’s because the Chrome OS filesystem has evolved in the past year and due to expected support for a particular file type for older Linux kernels never worked out. I’d rather the Chromium team take their time for a well designed and implemented solution so as not to break any functionality. Plus there’s the challenge of having enough free storage to restore a container backup. Read more