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MDV

Mageia 8 Review by an Ubuntu & Mandriva User

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MDV
Reviews
Ubuntu

I am honored to review Mageia 8 today as an ex-Mandriva user and long time Ubuntu user at Ubuntu Buzz. Mageia version 8 just released this year in February with a ton of useful features and improvements by an enormous worldwide team of developers. Mageia is a French originated, desktop computer operating system that is user friendly and looks very beautiful derived from Mandriva GNU/Linux and is a Red Hat family thanks to its RPM software package format.Now it's time to the review that I divide into several parts below. I wish you will like it.

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Mageia: A New Board to go with the New Release

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MDV

The Mageia Association met for its Associate General Meeting on the 1st of March with the intention of electing a new Board to govern Mageia, as per the Mageia Constitution.

The Board consists of 6 – 12 individuals that oversee the financials and running of the distribution on matters that are above the Mageia Council. The new Board consists of individuals from around the world that have all joined the Mageia project with the hope of creating a unique and successful distribution that continues the legacy of powerful flexibility and ease of use set out at the start of the project.

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PCLinuxOS and OpenMandriva Leftovers

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PCLOS
MDV
  • Two PCLinuxOS Family Members Finally Meet

    I know that the question of meeting other PCLinuxOS users has, again, recently come up in the PCLinuxOS forums. While the middle of a pandemic might not be the best time to meet up with other PCLinuxOS users, it can be the perfect time to start planning a meeting for once this pandemic is in our rearview mirror.

    Meemaw and I, despite having "worked together" on The PCLinuxOS Magazine for many years, have never met face-to-face. We've burned up the email wires, and always do. We've "talked" extensively on IRC. We've texted each other on our cell phones. We've even talked to one another on the telephone. We are planning/hoping to get together for a trip to the Kansas City Zoo, just as soon as the weather turns decent. Even though Meemaw grew up in the Kansas City area, she hasn't been to the Kansas City Zoo in many, many years.

    If you live near another PCLinuxOS user, reach out and try to meet them. PCLinuxOS has always had a close, family kind of feeling to it, especially among PCLinuxOS forum members. So, why not try to meet those other family members? If you do, let us know about it here at The PCLinuxOS Magazine. We might just feature your "getting to know you" escapades in a future issue. And remember ... pictures, or it never happened!

  • PCLinuxOS Screenshot Showcase
  • OpenMandriva notable mention in social network

    FediFollows mentioned OpenMandriva in recommended follows of the week.

Two Nice Discoveries on PCLinuxOS 2021

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MDV

Today I bought a wireless mouse. Truth be told, I did it because, long ago, I had read that Linux had problems running such devices and I wanted to experiment.

I had booted my laptop with PCLinuxOS and, in my ignorance, I got ready to struggle with Bluetooth to configure it. I placed the batteries and plugged in the USB connector. That was all it took for PCLinuxOS to start using the device correctly, he, he. No struggle whatsoever.

Then I remembered that I could no longer type in Japanese using PCLinuxOS because iBus simply would not be displayed in the task bar (even after a correct installation of all the packages). So, I decided to tinker a bit to see if I could get Japanese IME to function once again.

All I did was to go to the PCLOS control center, System, Manage localization and, once there, select iBus after choosing the language. A message asked me to restart the session, so I logged out and back in.

But the iBus icon was not in the task bar. I looked in the menu and found "run iBus," so I ran it. Still, no icon in the task bar.

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A Week with Mageia 8: Two Success Stories

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MDV

Mageia 8 was released not long ago and I installed it as soon as it was out. However, I took a week to work with it and see how it plays with the other distros in my laptop.

I have a multi-boot system in which I always keep 4+ distros. Before this new install, I had PCLinuxOS, OpenMandriva Lx 4.2 (my latest install), Elive 3, MX Linux (Patio Feo), and Mageia 7. I logically wanted to upgrade Mageia 7 to 8.

Historically, this set up has meant several grub 2- related headaches: if I installed OpenMandriva after Mageia, Mageia would boot very slowly. If, on the other hand, Mageia controlled the grub post installation, OpenMandriva would get a kernel panic. As I lack technical knowledge, I could never fix those problems myself.

This time, I passed on the live version and decided to install the complete release, which I nostalgically call the PowerPack. If I recall correctly, one cannot upgrade from a live version, so I chose "install" instead of "upgrade," which wipes out the root partition. Still, I kept /home intact. With this distro image, the install takes more time, but it was not bad. A plus is that the process has remained pretty much consistent all these years and this makes the installation a familiar path.

When everything was done, I rebooted and Mageia 8 took over grub control. I booted this new release and all was working great: internet connection, desktop effects, sound, and screen edges. My personal settings were preserved, so I installed my preferred programs and the system was ready. Even Steam games were kept and working.

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Also: OpenMandriva build infrastructure switches to ARM servers

OpenMandriva Lx 4.2 "Argon": First Impressions after Install

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MDV

Please do not misinterpret me. I do not mean that I under appreciate the hard work of the OpenMandriva developers and community in making sure that everything under the hood of this distro functions smoothly; it's quite the opposite. I, for one, truly value their commitment and effort. However, I cannot pretend to grasp the technicalities. I am one of those users who do not understand what "Qt Framework 5.15.2, LLVM/clang 11.0.1, systemd 247, Java 15, Calamares 3.2.35, binutils 2.36.1, gcc 10.2." imply on the system.

My perspective is, then, one of a non-technical user and this is what I have seen so far...

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OpenMandriva Lx 4.2 is out now

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MDV

The OpenMandriva Team is pleased to announce the general availability of the latest stable version. Say hello to OpenMandriva Lx 4.2.

OpenMandriva Lx is a unique and independent distribution, direct descendant of Mandriva Linux and the first Linux distribution using the LLVM toolchain by default since 2015.

In the OpenMandriva Lx system the users can do anything they are used to doing with the proprietary systems, but it is free and already includes many pieces of software you have to pay for in the proprietary world, from office suites to video editors to games.

OMLx 4.2 is now even easier to use with improved OM Welcome, the brand-name tool which makes possible to install a range of well known applications with just one click.

This release comes with the latest and brightest KDE products (see below for technical details).
This version also includes:
LibreOffice suite 7.1.0, Krita 4.4.2, Digikam 7.2, SMPlayer 21.1.0, VLC 3.0.12.1, Falkon browser 3.1, SimpleScreenRecorder 0.4.3;
Desktop Presets (om-feeling-like) to customize the appearance of your OpenMandriva Plasma desktop to look and feel similar to other systems you may be used to;
Software Repository Selector (om-repo-picker) to enable additional repositories with thousands of additional Free Software packages.

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Test driving Mageia 8 RC

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MDV
Reviews

After learning that the Mageia 8 RC is available, I downloaded the live .iso and gave it a quick run.

I must say that, as a user that has been on the Mageia ship since the release of Mageia 1 back in 2010, one of the features that I appreciate from the project is its consistency and visual stability.

Please do not get me wrong: of course I appreciate innovation! However, non-technical users of Linux tend to get puzzled after becoming familiar with a distro just to find that developers, in subsequent releases, change the UI so much that they feel alienated by the OS.

Most of the changes in Mageia happen under the hood, so the UI has remained pretty stable from the beginning. In fact, upon booting Mageia 8 RC, my untrained eye sees no big difference other than the updated wallpaper: Mageia just feels familiar and keeps the consistent Mandriva PowerPack UI (license, country, language, etc). This is great as I will not feel lost when I decide to install it.

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Announcing Mageia 8 RC1

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MDV

We look forward to hearing your thoughts and feedback so that we can continue workingto get Mageia 8 ready for release.

Mageia 8’s new artwork has also been integrated, the community has made some really nice images, here is the new signature background, as well as the additional backgrounds that will be included.

PHP was recently updated to 8.0.2, therefore, feedback on PHP applications will be helpful to check for issues. The NVIDIA drivers have been switched to gl-vendor-neutral-dispatch, so MESA applications can work on such systems, with 460 series on x86_64 and 390 series still available. Note that the NVIDIA 340 series is no longer supported. DrakX, our installer, will switch supported systems to NVIDIA 390 where possible, or use the nouveau driver if they are unsupported by the newer drivers.

For Amd graphic cards based on Southern Islands family (Tahiti, Pitcairn, Oland, Verde, Hainan) and Sea Islands family (Kaveri, Bonaire, Hawaii, Kabini, Mullins) we are now defaulting to the newer amdgpudriver instead of the older Radeon, and feedback, if it works properly or not on your hardware, would be helpful.

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Mageia Artwork Voting

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MDV

With the first release candidate due in the coming weeks, it’s time to get the artwork for Mageia 8 finished. Before we get down to choosing the images, it’s really great to see all of the submissions and how creative people are, they will definitely help make Mageia 8 look great, our thanks to everyone that has given their time for this.

There will be two votes, one for backgrounds and one for screensavers. The signature background will be chosen from the top 5, the runners up will be included as additional backgrounds. The screensavers will be taken from the top 20 images that are suitable.

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Indie dev finds that Linux users generate more, better bug reports

An indie developer has found an interesting observation: Though only 5.8% of his game's buyers were playing on Linux, they generated over 38% of the bug reports. Not because the Linux platform was buggier, either. Only 3 of the roughly 400 bug reports submitted by Linux users were platform specific, that is, would only happen on Linux. The developer, posting as Koderski for developer Kodera Software on Reddit, makes indie game ΔV: Rings of Saturn—that's Delta V, or DV, for the non-rocket-science-literate. It's a hard science, physics-based space mining and piracy game that I quite like, personally, for its blend of playability that still honors the basics of spaceflight. If you quite like the space combat of, say, The Expanse, DV is a sim that might be for you. Koderski says he's sold a little over 12,000 copies of his game, and about 700 of those were bought by Linux players. "I got 1040 bug reports in total, out of which roughly 400 are made by Linux players," says Koderski's post. "That’s one report per 11.5 users on average, and one report per 1.75 Linux players. That’s right, an average Linux player will get you 650% more bug reports." Koderski's numbers are a limited sample size drawn from one person's experience, but tell a compelling story. Read more

today's howtos

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    Stremio is a media center that allows users to watch movies, TV shows, and even YouTube videos instantaneously. It also supports DLNA and many other features. Here’s how to use Stremio on Linux.

  • Deploying containers with Consfigurator

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  • Vincent Bernat: FRnOG #34: how we deployed a datacenter in one click

    The presentation, in French, was recorded. I have added English subtitles.

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