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Yet Another Gentoo Defector

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Gentoo It amused me today to see two blog posts, both about users switching from Gentoo to *buntu. The two authors I mentioned above gave up on Gentoo because of persistent problems with the package management system, Portage. Like the authors of the two posts, I recently switched.

Why I am Making the Switch from Gentoo to Kubuntu

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Gentoo I am an advocate of Gentoo. Linux ricer? Sure, why not, I live for those minute speed advantages. I also, perhaps masochistically, prefer building every package from source. Why, then, am I dumping Gentoo, and for kubuntu of all distros?

Also: Bye Gentoo... Welcome Ubuntu

Not the Gentoo Weekly Newsletter, Chapter 6

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Gentoo Not the Gentoo Weekly Newletter Chapter 6 is online and ready to go. Topics include Travel report: FOSDEM, Gentoo Improvement: Trustees, Interview with a bot: Amarok, and Tips&Tricks: bash completion.

Breaking a dpkg Addiction with Gentoo

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Gentoo “Hello. My name is Kevin, and I’m a dpkg addict. Its been 3 days since my last apt-get…” Dpkg is the package management system for the *buntu’s and for Debian. I have had an itch for a little while to move away from downloading prebuilt packages. Why?

New Gentoo foundation trustees elected

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Gentoo New trustees for the Gentoo Foundation were just elected. The foundation takes care of Gentoo's intellectual property (copyrights, trademarks) and money. It ensures that nobody violates our copyrights and trademarks, serves as a place to hold money, and decides where to devote that money in the best interests of Gentoo.

What are the top 3 issues facing Gentoo?

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spyderous.livejournal: I ran a quick, informal poll on the internal Gentoo developers' list last week, and tonight I began analyzing the results. 50 developers responded to my 9-question survey, and I'm going to post the results of 1 question at a time.

Gentoo Monthly Newsletter: 18 February 2008

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This month's issue implements some of the interesting suggestions we received from our readers. The security statistics have been removed, since it seemed to add a lot of clutter with little value-addition to the newsletter. Graphical bugzilla and package statistics is another feature we implemented.

Not the Gentoo Weekly Newsletter, Part 5

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It's not that time of the week again, so here's another Not the GWN. Highlights include a lection on buzzwords, discordian dates and how to file bugs. Some recipes and beer recomendations included, etc. etc. pp. Squid pro quo, carpe diem and honi soit qui mal y pense.

Gentoo Linux

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sajestanus.wordpress: Just out of curiousity, I tried Gentoo. I had doubts because it takes so long for everything to compile. After installing with a networkless install, I learned it did it with binary packages instead of compiling from source.

Why Gentoo is dead :(

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computingfunnyfacts: I finally removed myself from all the Gentoo mailing lists. I did this with some sad thoughts. I had been using gentoo for almost 4 Years and it taught me quite a lot about Linux. Unfortunately I have been seeing the Gentoo project die over the past year or so.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu Touch OTA-7 Update Is Being Tested, on Track for October Launch
    The Ubuntu Touch OS is getting a new OTA very soon and the developers are putting the final touches on it. The update is still on track for an October 19 launch and it will remain that way if nothing goes wrong.
  • False Rumors About Microsoft Buying Canonical Are Ridiculous
    The rumor that Microsoft is interested in buying Canonical doesn't seem to go away, despite the fact that there is no real basis to it. We’ve already explained why that is unlikely to happen, but people still don't listen, so here are some more reasons why the rumor is perfect for April 1.
  • Is Microsoft Wooing Canonical & Important Departures…
    A while back I was fitted for a tinfoil hat by some because I had the audacity — the audacity! — to suggest that it would be a shrewd business move by the now-Linux-loving Microsoft to buy Canonical because a.) Canonical had technology that Microsoft would want and need to advance in mobile (like the Ubuntu Phone technology, which blows Microsoft’s out of the water currently), and b.) by this time, Mark Shuttleworth is beyond tired of flushing millions after millions down the toilet (though, as a half-billionaire, he still has several decades of current spending before his bank account resembles, well, mine), and who can blame him? You laughed. Well, sports fans, allow me to hand back your tinfoil hat and ask, who’s laughing now? Linux Journal’s James Darvell outlines this scenario in great detail, quoting a blog item reporting the business deal, and makes an observation worth keeping an eye on: “Microsoft could convert Canonical into a very profitable acquisition by eliminating the unprofitable parts of the company,” he writes. “In fact, it could become the dominant player in the cloud space, and secure the company’s future.”
  • Spice Vulnerabilities Closed in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and Ubuntu 15.04
    A Spice vulnerability has been found and repaired in the Ubuntu 15.04 and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS operating systems. The SPICE protocol client and server library has been patched in the past few months a couple of times, and this is just the latest fix. It's not a major component, but users should really close any kind of exploit and vulnerability and upgrade their systems frequently.

Security Leftovers

Android Leftovers

Using open source principles to build better engineering teams

We become better software developers by observing how some of the best software in the world is being written. Open source has changed and will continue to change the way the world builds software, not only by creating high-quality reusable components, but by giving us a model for how to produce better software. Open source gives us complete transparency into that process. Read more