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Gentoo

Gentoo on Android 64bit Release

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Android
Gentoo

Gentoo Project Android is pleased to announce a new 64bit release of the stage3 Android prefix tarball. This is a major release after 2.5 years of development, featuring gcc-10.1.0, binutils-2.34 and glibc-2.31.

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Also: Gentoo On Android 64-Bit Sees New Release After 2+ Years

The 10 Best Gentoo Linux Derivatives To Explore in 2020

Filed under
Linux
Gentoo

Gentoo Linux derivatives can be the ideal choice for the professional Linux users who don’t want to compromise about the system stability and performance. Some of you might know nothing about Gentoo Linux. Unlike other Linux distributions like Ubuntu, Kali, etc., Gentoo is quite unfamiliar...

Only the veteran Linux users know about this. And, the people who know about its potential hardly go back to any other distributions. The exclusivity of the Gentoo Linux is that you need to build the whole flashable image from the source code. That sometimes may require a few days based on your machine’s strength.

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Gentoo: 200th Gentoo Council Meets and TheMightyBuzzard Adopts Gentoo

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Gentoo
  • 200th Gentoo Council meeting

    Way back in 2005, the reorganization of Gentoo led to the formation of the Gentoo Council, a steering body elected annually by the Gentoo developers. Forward 15 years, and today we had our 200th meeting! (No earth shaking decisions were taken today though.) The logs and summaries of all meetings can be read online on the archive page.

  • Site Potpourri for Mother's Day [Updated]

    Servers, Part 1. Behind the scenes, TheMightyBuzzard spent the weekend setting up a new server, aluminum. We are gradually moving to a Gentoo Linux base for our servers. Rather than pre-compiled binaries that get downloaded and run locally, Gentoo provides source code for download that one compiles and builds locally. At the moment we have three Gentoo-based servers (lithium, magnesium, and aluminum), one server on CentOS (beryllium), and the rest are on Ubuntu. By moving to Gentoo Linux, we get a streamlined server with a smaller attack surface as only the things we need are built into the kernel. That lone CentOS server? It has been with us from the start and has been no end of a hassle. Several services "live" on it and these need to be migrated before we can retire it. The first stage of that process is underway as Deucalion has been working on bringing up IRC on aluminum. In turn, other services will be brought over. Then we can (finally!) retire beryllium for good! Next on the list are sodium and boron (aiming to have completed by June.) Along with that, there have been new (security and otherwise) releases of other services that site depends on. We intend to get those upgraded as we move to an entirely Gentoo platform. Please join me in wishing them well on the migrations and upgrades!

Reviving Gentoo Bugday

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Gentoo

Reviving an old tradition, the next Gentoo Bugday will take place on Saturday 2020-06-06. Let’s contribute to Gentoo and fix bugs!

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Gentoo-Based exGENT Linux Now Available for Raspberry Pi 4

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OS
Gentoo

Developer Arne Exton is experimenting with new projects and released a version of his exGENT Linux distribution for the latest Raspberry Pi 4 single-board computer.

Based on Gentoo Linux, exGENT is a distro created by Arne Exton and designed for advanced Linux users and anyone else who really wants to learn Linux. It’s one of the very few up-to-date live Gentoo systems.

While exGENT Linux is fun to use on the desktop, you can now use it on your tiny Raspberry Pi 4 computer thanks to the hard work by developer Arne Exton.

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Porteus Kiosk 5.0 Released with Linux 5.4 LTS, Many Improvements

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Gentoo

It’s been more almost six months since the last Porteus Kiosk release and the team lead by Tomasz Jokiel proudly unveiled today a new major series of the Gentoo-based operating system that lets you transform a computer into a versatile and flexible kiosk system.

Porteus Kiosk 5.0 includes major software upgrades, starting with the kernel, which has been updated to the long-term supported Linux 5.4 series. Linux kernel 5.4.23 LTS is included in this first release of the 5.0 series, adding better support for newer hardware and many other benefits.

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Michał Górny on Python in Gentoo

Filed under
Development
Gentoo
  • Gentoo Python Guide

    Gentoo provides one of the best frameworks for providing Python support in packages among operating systems. This includes support for running multiple versions of Python (while most other distributions avoid going beyond simultaneous support for Python 2 and one version of Python 3), alternative implementations of Python, reliable tests, deep QA checks. While we aim to keep things simple, this is not always possible.

    At the same time, the available documentation is limited and not always up-to-date. Both the built-in eclass documentation and Python project wiki page provide bits of documentation but they are mostly in reference form and not very suitable for beginners nor people who do not actively follow the developments within the ecosystem. This results in suboptimal ebuilds, improper dependencies, missing tests.

  • No more PYTHON_TARGETS in single-r1

    Since its inception in 2012, python-single-r1 has been haunting users with two sets of USE flags: PYTHON_TARGETS and PYTHON_SINGLE_TARGET. While this initially seemed a necessary part of the grand design, today I know we could have done better. Today this chymera is disappearing for real, and python-single-r1 are going to use PYTHON_SINGLE_TARGET flags only.

    I would like to take this opportunity to explain why the eclass has been designed this way in the first place, and what has been done to change that.

    Why PYTHON_SINGLE_TARGET?

Pentoo – A Security-Focused Linux Distro Based on Gentoo

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Gentoo
Security

Pentoo is an open-source Live CD and Live USB Gentoo Linux-based operating system designed for experts in the field of penetration testing and security assessment. It is available for both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures and is can be run as an overlay on an existing Gentoo installation.

If you’re not familiar with Gentoo Linux, it is an advanced Linux distro that enables users to compile their operating system from the source in other to enjoy advantages such as applications and optimal performance specific to the computer, to mention a couple.

It does not have an installer and users are to translate the software they want before continuing with the installation. In short, one shouldn’t go near it if they don’t have the perseverance for filing through Linux documentation.

Just like with Gentoo, Pentoo has an advanced Python-based package management system with cool features such as “fake” (OpenBSD-style) installs, system profiles, config file management, safe unmerging, and virtual packages, among others.

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exGENT 2020 Linux Distro Makes Gentoo Fun to Use with the LXQt Desktop

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Linux
Gentoo

Arne Exton’s exGENT GNU/Linux distribution aims to continue the tradition of Gentoo-based live distros with a new release that puts the latest LXQt 0.14.1 desktop environment in the spotlight.

We all know by now that Gentoo is one of the hardest Linux-based operating systems to install due to packages needing to be compiled from sources locally. But the good thing about Gentoo is that it doesn’t uses a one-size fits all approach, which mens that it can be fully optimized for specific hardware.

Newcomers who want to try Gentoo Linux on their personal computer have a hard time due to the lack of Gentoo-based live distributions. Here’s where exGENT Linux comes into play, promising to offer users an up-to-date Gentoo-based live system that can be installed in a few minutes.

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Meet Calculate Linux 20!

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Gentoo

For this new (year) release, Gentoo 17.1 was used as the base profile, all binary packages recompiled with GCC 9.2, and overlays managed with eselect. Calculate Linux will no longer come in 32 bits.

Are available for download: Calculate Linux Desktop featuring the KDE (CLD), Cinnamon (CLDC), LXQt (CLDL), Mate (CLDM) or else Xfce (CLDX and CLDXS) scientific, Calculate Directory Server (CDS), Calculate Linux Scratch (CLS) and Calculate Scratch Server (CSS).

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Also: Gentoo-Based Calculate Linux 20 Released To Ring In The New Year, Free Of 32-Bit Support

Calculate Linux 20 Now Available For Download

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More in Tux Machines

Michael Larabel on What's Coming in Linux 5.9: OpenRISC, NFS and Intel

  • OpenRISC Sees Sane TLB Flushing With Linux 5.9

    While RISC-V is flourishing when it comes to this open-source CPU architecture, the related OpenRISC architecture is still advancing but not seeing as much hardware efforts around it. In any case, the Linux kernel support continues improving for OpenRISC and with Linux 5.9 are more improvements.  OpenRISC still lacks any open-source ASIC with predominantly being used on FPGAs and a few commercial efforts based on the OpenRISC 1000 architecture. OpenRISC on the Linux software side has continued seeing improvements since its introduction back in 3.1. 

  • NFS Client Changes For Linux 5.9 Include User Xattr Support

    As reported a few days ago the NFS server with Linux 5.9 saw user xattr support finally merged for user-extended attributes as defined by RFC 8276. The NFS client changes have now been sent in for this kernel and include the user xattr support along with other changes.  The NFS client pull request was sent in on Friday by Trond Myklebust. Most notably is the support for user extended attributes through the NFSv4.2 protocol as previously covered on Phoronix. Both the client and server support was wired up by an Amazon engineer. 

  • Intel P-State With Linux 5.9 Adds Passive Mode With Hardware P-States

    Merged last week to Linux 5.9 were the main set of power management updates while hitting the kernel now are some last minute power-related changes.  Intel power management maintainer Rafael Wysocki for a while now has been working on allowing the P-State CPU frequency scaling driver to work in its passive mode when hardware p-states (HWP) is enabled for the system. That support is now deemed ready for mainline and will be available with Linux 5.9.

KDE Development Report From Nate Graham

  • This week in KDE: Highlight changed settings and much much more

    This week a big new feature landed for Plasma 5.20: the System Settings app now has the ability to optionally highlight any settings you’ve changed from their default states! This required a ton of engineering throughout the stack which will pay many dividends down the road. For example, it opens the door to a global “reset to defaults” button now that all of the pages know what their default states actually are and take into account distro default settings, rather than always using KDE upstream defaults. Big thanks to Kevin Ottens, Benjamin Port, and Cyril Rossi, who made this happen.

  • KDE Plasma 5.20 Seeing More System Settings Work, KDE-Inhibit Helper

    KDE developers remain very busy tacking new features onto Plasma 5.20 and other improvements for polishing their desktop.  KDE developer Nate Graham has published his weekend report on the various KDE changes that landed over the past week. Some of this week's highlights include:  - Plasma 5.20's System Settings can now highlight any settings that have been changed from their default states.  - The System Settings area's autostart page has been rewritten. Also, the System Settings global shortcuts and standard shortcuts have been combined into a single "shortcuts" area. 

Games: Vaporum, Veloren and Dota 2

           
  • The Vaporum: Lockdown teaser has me wanting more

    Vaporum: Lockdown is the upcoming prequel to 2017's Vaporum, a first-person real-time dungeon crawler that impressed with the graphical style and the gameplay. With grid-based movement, it was something of a highlight if you enjoyed classics like Dungeon Master I and II, the Eye of the Beholder series, and the more recent Legend of Grimrock I and II.

  • Want more professional Godot Engine tutorials? Check out this new Kickstarter

    Interested in game development? Godot Engine is a constantly improving free, open source and high quality game engine and one developer is trying to push out more professional content to help people using it. Nathan Lovato has been working on GDQuest, a free Software project and a social company that started off as a little YouTube channel focused on game art tutorials. They later moved onto Krita as their "first taste" of free software, and then they moved onto Godot Engine and Linux too. Since then they've continued to expand, putting out a ton of free tutorials and tools for developers over on the GDQuest website, which includes plenty of open source stuff.

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  • Papercraft tactical RPG 'Wildermyth' is now massively better after recent updates

    Wildermyth, a tactical turn-based RPG with a Papercraft styled design that's like a tabletop RPG mixed with XCOM has recently had some pretty huge tech upgrades. It's already winning me over as a game, with some fantastic campaigns to play through and a style that is just amazing. However, it has struggled with a few major technical issues across both Linux and Windows. In particular, the mouse was unusable in fullscreen which has now been fully solved. The developer has recently upgraded their use of the cross-platform tech: libGDX, LWJGL and GLFW to new major versions which has made the entire experience drastically better.

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  • Free and open source voxel RPG 'Veloren' has a huge new release out

    Veloren is an in-development open-world and open source voxel RPG, it shows a massive amount of promise and a brand new release is out for you to try. If you missed it, we did an interview with one of the developers back in June which is a good read if you want a little more background info. Inspired by the likes of Cube World, Dwarf Fortress, and Breath of the Wild it could be something special and this brand new 0.7 release is showing more of what it's capable of.

  • Dota 2 - The International 10 close to a record for the Battle Pass, new Collector’s Cache

    The International 10, Dota 2's upcoming major tournament is getting close to breaking another record for the prize pool. Plus there's a new Collector's Cache up. Mostly funded by the Battle Pass, where 25% of it goes into the prize pool and the rest to Valve, making it a tidy earner for Valve even with their costs. For the 2019 tournament, the total managed to hit $34,330,068 which was a world record for the biggest prize pool in a single e-sport event. It's looking this the next tournament is going to be even bigger with it currently sitting at $32,655,676. There's still quite a long while to go too, as the current Battle Pass isn't ending until September 19. Looks like we might have another world record on our hands here soon! A lot can happen though, as the actual tournament is no longer happening as planned. Valve delayed The International 10 until 2021, due to all the issues with COVID19 making travel a bad idea.

  • A weekend round-up: tell us what play button you've been clicking recently

    Another week has dragged on and here we are, the weekend. It's time to go over a few little bits and find out what our readers have been playing this week. For me, I've been playing rather a lot of DRAG, the fancy new racer from Orontes Games. As pretty as it is and how smooth the performance is, the game itself might be the most frustrated I've been with a racing game—ever. Not the kind of frustration to put me off because of technical issues, more at my own inability to keep the damn car from sliding about everywhere and then smashing into a tiny little tree and losing a precious wheel. [...] Something very concerning is what's happening over at Mozilla. There's been some conflicting reports but they're definitely changing and letting go of 250 staff members. MDN (Mozilla Developer Network), practically one of the go-to places for reading up on web tech and standards also had its team gutted and they're trying to find a way forwards. Hopefully it's not all as bad as it sounds. It's alarming since they make Firefox, and it would be really bad if we ended up with just Chromium sticking around. Open source still sure, but Google pretty firmly control it. The somewhat good news, is that Mozilla has now managed to sign a new deal with Google for funding, which makes up the majority of their incoming monies.

Android Leftovers