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Qt 3D Studio 2.4 Released

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KDE

We are happy to announce the Qt 3D Studio 2.4 release is now available via the online and offline installers. Here’s a quick summary of the new features and functions in 2.4. For detailed information about the Qt 3D Studio, visit the online documentation page or see the older blog posts.

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Also: Qt 3D Studio 2.4 Released With Massive Performance Boost - By Switching Away From Qt 3D

Plasma 5.16 review - A tidal wave of goodness

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KDE

Plasma 5.16 is almost a boring release, in that it is predictable, stable, robust, a continuation of an excellent line of desktops that are fun, elegant and smart to run and use. But this is exactly what you want from a tool you use everyday. Excitement is only good in small doses. You want something solid for real work, and Plasma definitely nails it in general, and with its 5.16 guise in particular.

The volume of changes and new features isn't massive, but it is still delivered with flair, plus stability, plus improvements. There were a few small issues here and there, and some things warrant visual polish while others require philosophical introspection vis-a-vis taste and appeal, but these are relatively small, innocent niggles. The Plasma desktop is definitely making great strides, and if you want to explore the latest and greatest, grab yourself KDE neon, and start enjoying.

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An easier way to test Plasma

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KDE

Having the Plasma and Usability & Productivity sprints held at the same time and place had an unexpected benefit: we were able to come up with a way to make it easier to test a custom-compiled version of Plasma!

Previously, we had some documentation that asked people to create a shell script on their computers, copy files to various locations, and perform a few other steps. Unfortunately, many of the details were out of date, and the whole process was quite error-prone. It turned out that almost none of the Plasma developers at the sprint were actually using this method, and each had cobbled together something for themselves. Some (including myself) had given up on it and were doing Plasma development in a virtual machine.

So we put some time into easing this pain by making Plasma itself produce all the right pieces automatically when compiled from source. Then, we created a simple script to install everything properly.

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KDE Plasma 5.16.2 Desktop Environment Released with More Than 30 Bug Fixes

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KDE
Security

Coming just one week after the first point release, the KDE Plasma 5.16.2 maintenance update is here to add yet another layer of bug fixes with the ultimate goal to make the KDE Plasma 5.16 desktop environment more stable and reliable for users. In particular, this second point release introduces a total of 34 changes across various core components and apps.

"Today KDE releases a bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.16.2. Plasma 5.16 was released in June with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience. This release adds a week's worth of new translations and fixes from KDE's contributors. The bugfixes are typically small but important," reads today's announcement.

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Also: Plasma 5.16.2

0.4.1 Release of Elisa

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KDE

Elisa is a music player developed by the KDE community that strives to be simple and nice to use. We also recognize that we need a flexible product to account for the different workflows and use-cases of our users.

We focus on a very good integration with the Plasma desktop of the KDE community without compromising the support for other platforms (other Linux desktop environments, Windows and Android).

We are creating a reliable product that is a joy to use and respects our users privacy. As such, we will prefer to support online services where users are in control of their data.

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KDE: Usability & Productivity, Skrooge 2.20.0, New Site for Konsole and GSoC

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KDE
  • KDE Usability & Productivity: Week 76

    Week 76 in KDE’s Usability & Productivity initiative is here! This week’s progress report includes the first several says of the Usability & Productivity sprint, and as such, it’s absolutely overflowing with cool stuff!

  • KDE's Night Color Feature Being Ported From Wayland To X11

    It's another busy summer in the KDE space with a nice mixture of bug fixes and features being pursued for KDE Frameworks, KDE Plasma, and KDE Applications.

    One new feature coming is a back-porting of their night color feature from Wayland to X11. KDE, like many other desktops these days, has offered a "night color" option that adjusts the gamma ramp for the display output. This feature has just been supported on Wayland given that's their focus moving forward, but with no major blockers in supporting the feature on X11, that is now being addressed. This X11 support for the night color feature is coming for Plasma 5.17.

  • Skrooge 2.20.0 released

    The Skrooge Team announces the release 2.20.0 version of its popular Personal Finances Manager based on KDE Frameworks.

  • New website for Konsole

    The content could probably still need some improvements, so if you find typos or want to improve the wording of a sentence, please get in touch with KDE Promo. The good news is that you don’t need to be a programmer for this.

    [...]

    The new website uses Jekyll to render static html. Because the layout and the design aren’t unique to konsole.kde.org, I created a special Jekyll located at invent.kde.org/websites/jekyll-kde-theme, so that only the content and some configuration files are located in the websites/konsole-kde-org repository. This make it easier to maintain and will make it easier to change others website in the future without repeating ourself.

    This was a bit harder to deploy than I first though, I had problem with installing my Jekyll theme in the docker image, but after the third or fourth try, it worked and then I had an encoding issue, that wasn’t present on my development machine.

  • Crazy Last Weeks

    Last weeks have been crazy for me. Since the GSoC began, I have been rushing everything related to university and my life to dedicate exclusively to the development. Besides the two classes I was taking, Static Code Analysis and Approximation Algorithms, I had my obligatory teaching internship in Project and Analysis of Algorithms for the postgraduate program, where I was responsible for creating and evaluating assignments for 50+ students and answering general questions.

    [...]

    I am using as my environment the Qt Creator, and I am focusing in the algorithm for creation of specific graph classes inside the generategraphwidget. I have already implemented algorithms for Paths, Complete and Complete Bipartite graphs, besides fixing some details here and there. These modifications are still only in my local machine, as I am having some problems pushing the commits (I must be doing something wrong in my configuration).

KStars v3.3.1 is released

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KDE

KStars v3.3.1 is released for Windows, MacOS, and Linux on all platforms (Intel/AMD and ARM). This is yet another maintenance release with a few new experimental features and addons.

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KDE: Latte, Plasma Vision and GSoC

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KDE
  • Latte and "Flexible" settings...

    Following Latte and a "Shared Layouts" dream, today I am going to present you all the new settings pages for upcoming v0.9 and the approach used for them. In following screenshots you can find Basic and Advanced pages for docks and panels.

  • Plasma Vision

    The Plasma Vision got written a couple years ago, a short text saying what Plasma is and hopes to create and defines our approach to making a useful and productive work environment for your computer. Because of creative differences it was never promoted or used properly but in my quest to make KDE look as up to date in its presence on the web as it does on the desktop I’ve got the Plasma sprinters who are meeting in Valencia this week to agree to adding it to the KDE Plasma webpage.

  • Day 26

    I’m in the end of my semester at college, so I need to split my time with GSoC and my college tasks, so now I’m going slowly but on the next month I have my vacation and I’ll have all of my time dedicated to it.
    My menthors have helped me a lot so far, and I would like to say thanks for the patience, and say sorry for KDE for my initial project and for waste the first weeks on a thing that didn’t produce anything.

  • LabPlot getting prettier and also support for online datasets

    Hello everyone! I'm participating in Google Summer of Code for the second time. I'm working on KDE's LabPlot, just like last year. I'm very happy that I can work again with my former and current mentor Kristóf Fábián, and with Alexander Semke, an invaluable member of the LabPlot team, who is like a second mentor to me.

    [...]

    We had to create metadata files in order to record additional information about datasets, and also to divide them into categories and subcategories. We use a metadata data file which contains every category and subcategory and a list of datasets for every subcategory. Additionally there is a metadata file for every dataset containing various data about the dataset itself.

    In the "Datasets" section we highlight every dataset the metadata of which is locally available (in the labplot directory located in the user's home directory). When the user clicks on the "Clear cache" button every file is deleted from the above mentioned directory. The "Refresh" button provides the possibility to refresh the locally available metadata file, which contains the categories and subcategories.
    In order to make possible the import of datasets into LabPlot, and saving them into Spreadsheets I had to implement a helper class: DatasetHandler. This class processes a dataset's metadata file, configures the Spreadsheet into which the data will be loaded, downloads the dataset, processes it (based on the preferences present in the metadata file) then loads its content into the spreadsheet.

Multimedia: Goodvibes, Goggles Music Manager (GogglesMM), kdenlive

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KDE
Software
  • Goodvibes – internet radio player

    Why do I love internet radio? There’s no sign-up or subscription charges. There’s a huge range of stations available from around the world. If you like classical music, pop music, folk music, news, talk radio, and much more, internet radio has something for everyone wherever you live (providing you have a net connection).

    I hope you’ve enjoyed my reviews of internet radio players. These reviews examined odio, Shortwave, Radiotray-NG, PyRadio, StreamTuner2, and Curseradio. I’ve been dabbling with another internet radio player, which carries the moniker Goodvibes.

    Goodvibes is billed as a lightweight internet radio player offering a simple way to access your favorite radio stations.

    Goodvibes is written in C and builds with Meson. The core building blocks are provided by GLib, the HTTP segments are handled by LibSoup, the audio part is delegated to GStreamer, and the graphical user interface is written with GTK+.

  • Why this developer wrote a quick and responsive music player

    I wrote recently that "GogglesMM has been one of my favorite players for quite some time now." So, when I was thinking about interviewing developers who build and maintain open source music players, Sander Jansen came quickly to mind. Sander is the developer and maintainer of Goggles Music Manager (GogglesMM), a very fine open source music player that's particularly well-suited to getting the music stream from the computer to the digital-analog converter (DAC) in a very transparent fashion.

    In my first article in this series, I interviewed Juan Rios, creator of the Guyadeque music player; the following is an edited version of my conversation with Sander.

  • The [kdenlive] Titler Tool – Onward with the 3rd week

    Hi! It’s been 3 weeks (more than that actually, couldn’t update yesterday due to some network glitches I was facing here) and the progress so far has been good – let’s get into it! In the last week’s blog, I had reasoned why the rendering part is being developed as a library rather than directly starting the work with the framework (MLT) and the one advantage, was that the testing process becomes a whole lot easier. And that’s exactly what I have been doing the last week – writing the test module for the library, i.e. writing unit tests and it has been quite interesting as it gave me a perspective on how the code can break at points. The crucial concept of unit tests is to be able to make sure that there is no regression – meaning your code will do some particular things that it is supposed to do when we know it works, and at whatever point in the future, it will for sure do these certain things when it is working –  Nice, eh? Unit testing, as the name suggests, is testing of the units – we take each functional unit of a code (or simply a function/method) and we test certain characterstics and make sure that these conditions are fulfilled. An example being that I can pick from one my unit tests is the the case of the method QmlRenderer::initializeRenderParams(…)

Qt Creator 4.10 Beta released

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KDE

You can “pin” files so they stay open when closing all files. Check the context menu on the document dropdown and the Open Documents pane.

The client for the Language Server Protocol is now better integrated into Locator, shows tooltip information from the server, and has more flexible server settings.
We also moved the plugin out of the experimental state, so it is enabled by default.

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Also: Qt Creator 4.10 Beta Allows Pinning Files, Support For Boost Tests

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